Paramedic field internship

justin1232

Forum Captain
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I'm about to start field internship in 2 weeks with a 3rd service EMS agency. Does anyone have any pointers to having a successful field time? Also is it normal to be nervous as hell haha
Thanks for responses!
 

joshrunkle35

EMT-P/RN
573
163
43
I'm about to start field internship in 2 weeks with a 3rd service EMS agency. Does anyone have any pointers to having a successful field time? Also is it normal to be nervous as hell haha
Thanks for responses!
Be polite, be professional. You are there as a student. Ask how you can help. Ask for help with learning opportunities. Other than that, you are visiting someone else’s home. Be quiet and don’t sit in someone else’s chair. No one cares about the cool stuff you have done so far in EMS/Fire.

Bring coffee/donuts on your first day. Most people might not eat them, but they’ll appreciate the gesture.

It’s ok to be nervous. You’ll be fine.
 

DrParasite

The fire extinguisher is not just for show
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Bring coffee/donuts on your first day. Most people might not eat them, but they’ll appreciate the gesture.
bagels and cream cheese is even better.

Show up 15 minutes early to the start of your shift. make sure you know how to get there. plan to be there 30 minutes early, so you can accommodate traffic and your fresh bagel delays. bring everything your FTO will expect you to have (books from school, protocols, scope, sheers, anything your instructors told you to bring). shine your boots the day before. Remember, this is your time to impress, so once you complete your internship, they offer you a job. And don't tell them you know what you are doing; show them by your actions.
 

mgr22

Forum Deputy Chief
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I agree with all of the above suggestions. I'll just add, don't criticize anyone from anywhere, even if you hear your preceptors doing that.
 
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justin1232

Forum Captain
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bagels and cream cheese is even better.

Show up 15 minutes early to the start of your shift. make sure you know how to get there. plan to be there 30 minutes early, so you can accommodate traffic and your fresh bagel delays. bring everything your FTO will expect you to have (books from school, protocols, scope, sheers, anything your instructors told you to bring). shine your boots the day before. Remember, this is your time to impress, so once you complete your internship, they offer you a job. And don't tell them you know what you are doing; show them by your actions.
Bagels sound like a great plan. Unfortunately I have no desire to work for place I am interning since I live way to far, but I want to leave a great impression. My main concern is pushing away my nervousness when it comes to running calls. As an EMT I was mostly doing what the medic said and driving, to now having to run the show
 

mgr22

Forum Deputy Chief
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My main concern is pushing away my nervousness when it comes to running calls. As an EMT I was mostly doing what the medic said and driving, to now having to run the show
I don't know of a way to eliminate all nervousness in the situation you'll be in. Maybe cut yourself some slack and acknowledge nervousness is normal when the stakes are high. Learn to work with some nervousness. Understand that nervousness is helping to keep you awake and focused. There's a lot of gray area between apathetic and non-functional.
 

DrParasite

The fire extinguisher is not just for show
5,166
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Unfortunately I have no desire to work for place I am interning since I live way to far, but I want to leave a great impression.
If you don't mind me asking, what make you chose that location then? my paramedic program director told me that the internship was a really long interview process, so when you got your P card, they would offer you a job (since you used their protocols, knew the system etc). The program had connections all over, including in other states. Plus, there are several EMS agencies are hesitant to hire a newbie paramedic with no experience (and yes, there are also those who prefer no experience, so they can teach them their way of doing things).
My main concern is pushing away my nervousness when it comes to running calls. As an EMT I was mostly doing what the medic said and driving, to now having to run the show
Can't help you with that one, but I will say the more patient contacts you have, the better off you will be.

Talk to the patient. listen to your patient. Introduce yourself, especially to those patients who aren't actively dying (you would be shocked how many new providers don't do it). They are more than a patient, they are a person too, and are likely having a really bad day. Calm them down, make them like you, and remember you in a positive way. And clinically treat them appropriately.

It does get easier, the more experience you have doing the job. and we were all new once, and many of us even remember were we came from, and what it was like to be new.
 

KingCountyMedic

Forum Lieutenant
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Show up 30 minutes early. Wash the rig or assist in washing the rig. Do rig check or assist in rig check. Bringing food is nice, healthy options are appreciated vs. doughnuts usually. Introduce yourself to everyone with a good handshake. Be clean cut, shaved if applicable, and look good with whatever uniform option you are wearing. Don't be chewing gum but have good breath. Everyone is Sir or Mam, Mr. or Mrs. If they are an officer use their rank when you address them: Chief, Captain, etc. On calls do what you are told, make sure expectations are explained. Continue to address everyone on the calls with respect. Your patients are Mr. or Mrs. Sir or Mam etc. Don't sit on your patients furniture, it's not your house. Don't address elderly patients as "sweetie" or "young lady"

Treat everyone with respect and compassion. Be nice and be aggressive when the patient is dying and needs you to go to work but don't bark orders at your EMT's. Treat everyone on the team as a valuable partner. Don't engage in political discussions, don't share personal opinions with people you don't know. Sit where they tell you to sit, be productive and help clean up after dinner.

There's a start. :)

Good luck
 

VentMonkey

Professional Blindspot
Premium Member
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Read this blogpost when you get a chance:

I sure wish these were around when I did my internship. Also, it describes perfectly what I’d been trying to convey to interns for years.
 
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justin1232

Forum Captain
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If you don't mind me asking, what make you chose that location then? my paramedic program director told me that the internship was a really long interview process, so when you got your P card, they would offer you a job (since you used their protocols, knew the system etc). The program had connections all over, including in other states. Plus, there are several EMS agencies are hesitant to hire a newbie paramedic with no experience (and yes, there are also those who prefer no experience, so they can teach them their way of doing things).
Can't help you with that one, but I will say the more patient contacts you have, the better off you will be.

Talk to the patient. listen to your patient. Introduce yourself, especially to those patients who aren't actively dying (you would be shocked how many new providers don't do it). They are more than a patient, they are a person too, and are likely having a really bad day. Calm them down, make them like you, and remember you in a positive way. And clinically treat them appropriately.

It does get easier, the more experience you have doing the job. and we were all new once, and many of us even remember were we came from, and what it was like to be new.
I was having issues obtaining a internship in my area due to local contracts with other schools, and the one contract I had the company went out of business like 2 weeks before I started haha 😂. So I ended up obtaining an internship in another county and making a trip out of it
 
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justin1232

Forum Captain
275
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Read this blogpost when you get a chance:

I sure wish these were around when I did my internship. Also, it describes perfectly what I’d been trying to convey to interns for years.
That was a great blog post btw 🙌🏻
 

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