NREMT-B vs. EMT-B

yay4stress

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Hi, I'm a EMT-B in Pennsylvania.

as I wander around the EMS world, I keep encountering various bits of alphabet soup after people's names.

The two I am interested in are EMT-B (which follows my name) and NREMT-B.

is there something special one has to do to get added to the national registry? or is that just a side effect of passing state exams that they don't tell you about?

TIA
 

BossyCow

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The National Registry is a separate registration that requires its own individual testing process.
 
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yay4stress

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is there a reason why one should take such an exam?

not trying to be sarcastic, honestly wondering
 

seanm028

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Some states require it.

For example, I'm a certified EMT-B in Arizona. However, AZ doesn't have its own EMT test, so instead you go take the National Registry exam. If you pass, you bring your certificate down to DHS and they add you to the list of AZ State Certified EMTs.

I think its purpose was to try and standardize things across different states.
 

rgnoon

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Welcome to the site!
Now...one potential advantage to having NREMT is that it CAN make applying for reciprocity easier depending on the state in which one applies. However, we here in NJ use the mid-atlantic standardized EMT-B test. It is my understanding that PA is part of the mid-atlantic consortium as well. So for us to apply for reciprocity in one of the other mid-atlantic states (i.e NJ to PA, PA to NY, NY to MD), NREMT really has no bearing. There are certainly other reasons to test for the national registry, but the reciprocity is the one i that i hear most often.
 
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yay4stress

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ok

I guess since I don't intend to leave PA anytime soon, there really is no reason to bother.

Thanks
 

VentMedic

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Eventually your state may also go to the National Registry. You may be grandfathered with your state tested EMT-B, but eventually somewhere down the road you may find it easier if you have the NR. This is what some EMT-Bs are now finding in the state of Florida which recently changed from the state's test for EMT-B to the NR.
 
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yay4stress

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thats kind of ridiculous.

there's no reason for the state to give up it's own ability to certify EMS personnel!

Actually, I just don't want to have to take another test...
 

Ridryder911

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First you asked... don't be surprised of the answer. Second, actually it is not ridiculous, rather VERY smart. It costs money to produce tests and keep it current and legitimate, and valid.

As well, many may not be like you wanting to remain in one state, as well you really do NOT know what the future holds for you too. Never say never...
National testing promotes autonomy, professionalism, and having one being taught and credentialed by one test. Yes, each state can still license or certify dependent on their requirements then. Similar to physicians, PA's, RN's ,etc.

Just ridiculous for state's to pay for issuing, researching, and maintaining them...

R/r 911
 
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VentMedic

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Actually there are many reasons for a state to go with the NR.
1. It is easier to attrack potential employees from other states through retroprocity.

2. It offers a more nationally recognized uniformity for standards which:
a. offers the state and profession to lobby for more funding by conforming with a national standard
b. national standard sets the tone for educational improvement as a statewide endeavor.

3. Cheaper in the long run by offering a national test through a nationally recognized organization.

4. CEU providers will only have to worry about the NR accreditation for their educational offerings.

5. Ability to obtain CEUs without the extra state petitioning paperwork for approval for each class.

6. NR offers standard levels of certifications and combines the 6 or 8 different state certs in some states.

The National Registry is not perfect but considering almost every other profession base their state licensure off of a national certification, it could work well if the educational standard is established and the NR follows the path.
 
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BossyCow

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Also opportunities come up that require National Registry, exchanges with other systems, disaster relief, association with the system you work in and federal agencies such as National Parks, Forestry Service etc.

If you know your stuff, there is nothing to fear in a test. If you aren't secure in your knowledge, better to find out than go on blissfully ignorant of where you are weak until you need it on a patient.
 

rgnoon

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thats kind of ridiculous.

there's no reason for the state to give up it's own ability to certify EMS personnel!

Actually, I just don't want to have to take another test...
Yeah the idea of taking another test can be daunting, but I know that many of us in NJ (ok maybe not MANY...but SOME)...myself included...take the NR in the name of staying on top of continuing ed. Maybe we also do it "just in case", although new jersey only just recently switched from NREMT to the mid-atlantic test, I'm not exactly sure why but I'd venture to guess that it had something to do with the NREMT going digital.
 

rgnoon

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Also opportunities come up that require National Registry, exchanges with other systems, disaster relief, association with the system you work in and federal agencies such as National Parks, Forestry Service etc.
Sorry for the two posts...but this is really why I got the national registry, as I work with a SAR team who gets called out to other states rather frequently. I have to admit that disaster relief was also in the back of my mind having volunteered in NOLA on multiple occasions. I just hope that I never have to provide my National Registry card for such an event.
 

Arkymedic

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thats kind of ridiculous.

there's no reason for the state to give up it's own ability to certify EMS personnel!

Actually, I just don't want to have to take another test...
Well let me just say this since I come from a non-NR state. I am now a Paramedic in OK as well as AR. It cost me $200 for reciprocity and you have to be NREMT-P to obtain reciprocity. In AR your NR can lapse and as long as you meet state guidelines you can stay an AR Paramedic. Most Paramedics in this area that have been in EMS for lets say over 5 yrs have lapsed now. In OK they also use the National Registry FR and NREMT-I 99. With this system a Registered FR can work on an ambulance in OK.
 

Arkymedic

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Sorry for the two posts...but this is really why I got the national registry, as I work with a SAR team who gets called out to other states rather frequently. I have to admit that disaster relief was also in the back of my mind having volunteered in NOLA on multiple occasions. I just hope that I never have to provide my National Registry card for such an event.
With the new attention being paid to disaster credentialing it is quite possible
 

rgnoon

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Ok...what i REALLY meant to say was that I hope i never have to respond to such an event...:) sorry 'bout that
 

Ridryder911

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With the new attention being paid to disaster credentialing it is quite possible
Actually, most states have adopted the MCR as their credentialing criteria for disaster time. Medical Corp Reserve is the Federal Government division on local disaster responses, where as the Disaster Medical Assistance Team (DMAT) is for responses upon the Federal level.

I know in OK one will not be allowed to work or enter a disaster site, unless they have an I.D. issued through Medical Reserve Corp. I don't care what medical license, national registry, etc..


MCR has multiple levels from veterinary to public health, to initial disaster response teams. It is free, they perform FBI & local clearance background, as well provide free in-services.

Here is a link to there web site :

http://www.medicalreservecorps.gov/About

R/r 911
 
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yay4stress

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fair enough, I concede

it's interesting how this discussion developed, I was just interested in the difference between an EMT and an NREMT...
 
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Arkymedic

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Actually, most states have adopted the MCR as their credentialing criteria for disaster time. Medical Corp Reserve is the Federal Government division on local disaster responses, where as the Disaster Medical Assistance Team (DMAT) is for responses upon the Federal level.

I know in OK one will not be allowed to work or enter a disaster site, unless they have an I.D. issued through Medical Reserve Corp. I don't care what medical license, national registry, etc..


MCR has multiple levels from veterinary to public health, to initial disaster response teams. It is free, they perform FBI & local clearance background, as well provide free in-services.

Here is a link to there web site :

http://www.medicalreservecorps.gov/About

R/r 911
I play with MRC in both AR and OK Rid and AR has a new system we are trying out in addition to the MRC model. http://www.healthyarkansas.com/esar/
 

certguy

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Hi there ,
Another advantage of Nat. registry is that if you respond to a large natural disaster or god forbid , another 911 , if you wind up working with an out of area EMT who's got the registry , you and that person have equivelant training . There's no guesswork about whether or not the skills are the same.

CERTGUY
 

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