Jump bag

EpiEMS

Forum Deputy Chief
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I volunteer for a rural ambulance so there is a chance I need to respond to the scene before the rig shows up.
Just curious, do you have medical control and permission from your agency to operate under your EMT scope "off-duty"? Or are you considered "on duty" in the response area any time there's a call?
 

Giant81

Forum Lieutenant
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We don't actually have an on/off duty in my area and I don't recall ever learning about it in class, so I don't know how the paid for services do it in more populated areas.

If you're in your area, you can operate in your scope. If you are not in your response area, you cannot operate up to your scope and can only render basic first aid.

We have our own repeater and carry Motorola HT's. so when a call goes out, we just coordinate who is going where and put a crew together from the closest handful of people.
 

FireDog19

Justifiably Delusional
21
2
1
I volunteer in an 'out in the sticks' kinda place. I carry this literally everywhere: TQ or two, some gauze and rollers, gloves and sanitizer, notepad and pen, cpr sheild, stethoscope, ammonia inhalents, Band-Aids, prep pads, and because of how bad the drug scene is now two doses of narcan.
 

NomadicMedic

EMS Edumacator
11,124
5,587
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I volunteer in an 'out in the sticks' kinda place. I carry this literally everywhere: TQ or two, some gauze and rollers, gloves and sanitizer, notepad and pen, cpr sheild, stethoscope, ammonia inhalents, Band-Aids, prep pads, and because of how bad the drug scene is now two doses of narcan.
Why would you carry ammonia inhalents?
Is there any place in the country that still allows them to be used?

And TWO doses of Narcan. That's pretty high speed.
 

FireDog19

Justifiably Delusional
21
2
1
I've used a couple inhalants, not much or often. I actually carry the narcan for responders due to increase in accidental fentanyl overdoses such as when it gets up in the air.
 

NomadicMedic

EMS Edumacator
11,124
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Where are you? Are Amonia inhalants in your state's EMS formulary? Are you operating under any type of medical control? How exactly did you document using those amonia caps?

I won't even get into the ridiculousness of carrying Narcan for when fentanyl "gets up in the air". But, it's stupid.

But I will say, without reservation, you should throw those amonia caps away and don't ever think about using them again.
 

FireDog19

Justifiably Delusional
21
2
1
Where are you? Are Amonia inhalants in your state's EMS formulary? Are you operating under any type of medical control? How exactly did you document using those amonia caps?

I won't even get into the ridiculousness of carrying Narcan for when fentanyl "gets up in the air". But, it's stupid.

But I will say, without reservation, you should throw those amonia caps away and don't ever think about using them again.
That's fair on the ammonia, as far as the "getting up in the air" my Cheif has personally seen it happen to a LEO.

And yes I do operate under medical control, but honestly I don't know if ammonia is still in protocols for my state though.
 

NomadicMedic

EMS Edumacator
11,124
5,587
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Right. Shown to most likely NOT have been an opiate overdose. More like hysteria.

It just doesn't happen that way.

"Writing in the online magazine Slate, Jeremy Samuel Faust, an emergency physician at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, tried to imagine a scenario in which the Ohio officer could have accidentally inhaled or swallowed fentanyl – routes known to be potentially life-threatening. “But the amount that could have transferred from the … shirt to the fingers to the mouth or nose,” Faust wrote, “would not be a clinically significant quantity, even accounting for fentanyl’s potency.”

Faust added that he doesn’t think the officer or anyone at his police department is lying. “These police officers are at the front lines of an extremely challenging fight, and it is understandable that they would be freaked out by this event.”

Still, Faust said, the huge dose of naloxone needed to revive the officer suggests it was “treating the wrong illness.” And the media’s uncritical embrace of the story indicates “an interesting new hysteria, for lack of a better term, about opioids.”
 

FireDog19

Justifiably Delusional
21
2
1
I volunteer in an 'out in the sticks' kinda place. I carry this literally everywhere: TQ or two, some gauze and rollers, gloves and sanitizer, notepad and pen, cpr sheild, stethoscope, ammonia inhalents, Band-Aids, prep pads, and because of how bad the drug scene is now two doses of narcan.
Regardless everything but the ammonia and narcan would be great EDC for your vehicle.
 

EpiEMS

Forum Deputy Chief
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Giant81

Forum Lieutenant
118
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what about carfentanyl? that seems like it would take a very tiny amount to really mess up your day.

Also as far as inhalants go, we still have them on our rig and every week we check a box that they are there and not expired. Haven't used them in the 2 years I've been with the service, but we have them.
 

NomadicMedic

EMS Edumacator
11,124
5,587
113
what about carfentanyl? that seems like it would take a very tiny amount to really mess up your day.
It just doesn't happen.

Also as far as inhalants go, we still have them on our rig and every week we check a box that they are there and not expired. Haven't used them in the 2 years I've been with the service, but we have them.
They should probably be removed. Are they in your protocols anywhere?
 

gotbeerz001

Forum Deputy Chief
1,312
926
113
The only reason I have gloves is I end shift a lot with a spare pair in my pockets lol

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This.

Then when I get home I just shove them in a drawer in my bedside table.

Then it looks weird when you open that drawer in front of someone and they see hella gloves arms-reach from your bed.

#hawkward (hot + awkward)



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luke_31

Forum Asst. Chief
897
286
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This.

Then when I get home I just shove them in a drawer in my bedside table.

Then it looks weird when you open that drawer in front of someone and they see hella gloves arms-reach from your bed.

#hawkward (hot + awkward)



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Add a tube of KY jelly to make it really awkward;)
 

Giant81

Forum Lieutenant
118
24
18
Are they in your protocols anywhere?
Very good question and probably worth looking into. I've never had training on what our protocols are around their use. I've also never had to use one, or even been around when one was used. Also, I can't think of a scenario where I would use one.
 

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