Failed my first attempt at the paramedic exam today

ickyvicky

Forum Ride Along
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Is it common to fail the first time and pass the second? Also, anyone have resources they recommend to study? I’m going to buy a membership for MedicTests, but I’d like more than one resource.
 

Aprz

Non flying critical care flight attendant
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Google says first time pass rate for paramedics is 70%. I think the odds are in your favor of passing eventually.

Obviously the test has very randomized questions and covers everything. I think they send you something saying your stengths and weaknesses. Go over your weaknesses.

I think it is bad to study too much. You usually won't retain info well overstudying. Do something like study 30 minutes a couple of times a day max. The day before your test, rest. Take a break. What you'll gain from recharging will probably be more worthwhile than last minute cramming.

Be open to different learning styles. Be open to trying new studying ways or different mnemonics. You'd be surprised what works.



There's a really good one (same episode) where he is telling a room full of people how he remembers names. It's usually a stretch, haha, but it works for him. Couldn't find a full clip of it unfortunately, but he is using the trick in the car scene I just shared.
 

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mgr22

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Is it common to fail the first time and pass the second? Also, anyone have resources they recommend to study? I’m going to buy a membership for MedicTests, but I’d like more than one resource.
Are you talking about the registry exam?
 
OP
OP
I

ickyvicky

Forum Ride Along
8
0
1
Google says first time pass rate for paramedics is 70%. I think the odds are in your favor of passing eventually.

Obviously the test has very randomized questions and covers everything. I think they send you something saying your stengths and weaknesses. Go over your weaknesses.

I think it is bad to study too much. You usually won't retain info well overstudying. Do something like study 30 minutes a couple of times a day max. The day before your test, rest. Take a break. What you'll gain from recharging will probably be more worthwhile than last minute cramming.

Be open to different learning styles. Be open to trying new studying ways or different mnemonics. You'd be surprised what works.



There's a really good one (same episode) where he is telling a room full of people how he remembers names. It's usually a stretch, haha, but it works for him. Couldn't find a full clip of it unfortunately, but he is using the trick in the car scene I just shared.
Yes I usually don’t cram, and I never failed a fisdap test through the whole program. For whatever reason, it didn’t work for me this time. Maybe I was too tired? I just spent all day moving Monday on a broken foot and couldn’t sleep last night. Then drove 1 hour and 45 minutes to the test site. I’m hoping that’s all it is, but definitely opening up my mind to different learning techniques. I just don’t want to fail it again so I’m open for anything someone else had found helpful
 

Aprz

Non flying critical care flight attendant
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631
113
Yes I usually don’t cram, and I never failed a fisdap test through the whole program. For whatever reason, it didn’t work for me this time. Maybe I was too tired? I just spent all day moving Monday on a broken foot and couldn’t sleep last night. Then drove 1 hour and 45 minutes to the test site. I’m hoping that’s all it is, but definitely opening up my mind to different learning techniques. I just don’t want to fail it again so I’m open for anything someone else had found helpful
99% of people who say they failed NREMT talk about how well they did in their class, how well they did on practice tests, etc.. I think when it comes to the actual test, those things don't matter. Whatever it is, whatever people do to prepare for Fisdap, it does not prepare you for NREMT.
 

mgr22

Forum Deputy Chief
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It's not uncommon to pass after failing the first time. Some students overthink their answers. Some don't know the material well enough. Some get so anxious about the process, it affects their performance.

I see you're 23. You've probably taken lots of multiple-choice tests. How have you done in general?
 

Akulahawk

EMT-P/ED RN
Community Leader
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They should send results of the exam within a few days or so. While those results won't list specific questions and the correct answers, it should outline the areas of the exam where performance was both good and poor, therefore providing at least some guidance as to what should be studied/improved upon.

You will never see the exact same questions again. However, the exam is adaptive and will become very difficult the more you answer questions correctly. In fact, it will increase the difficulty until you answer incorrectly and when you do, it will ask an easier question.

I took the NCLEX-RN and it is also adaptive. My NREMTP exam was the "old" 150 question length test that went away many years ago. However, the test-taking strategies for the NCLEX and NREMT exams are going to be the same.

1) Read the question, then read ALL the answers. Go back and re-read the question with the answers in mind. Look specifically for words and phrases in the question that may have been missed. There's usually an answer that "fits" the most common misread of that question.
2) True/False questions are ones where the ENTIRE answer must be true/correct as written, otherwise it is "false" and you cannot do a "but this is true in x situation" because that is not a true "as written" answer. I call this the "yeah, but..." Don't fall for that.
3) Select All That Apply - these are essentially multiple choice T/F. Consider each "answer" line individually and it must be entirely "true" or it must be "false."
4) Once you make your selection for an answer and you're sure you've read the question correctly and chosen the most correct answer, submit your answer and forget the question you just had. It will usually have NO bearing upon the next question. If you have a situational series of questions, it will tell you so and should keep the relevant portions of the setup visible to you to refer to. Once that goes away, forget that situation series as it will have no bearing on what comes next.
5) you've already had a look at the exam style, so you now should have a better idea how to tackle it next time. Do not get complacent and do not study for this like you would for any other style exam. Most typical exams only test rote memory. Adaptive exams make you think and test your knowledge and partly readiness for entry level practice in the field.
 

NomadicMedic

EMS Educator
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There are three prep services that I recommend.

Limmer education. (There are several products)
MedicTests
Navigate (only for iOS devices)

However, buying all the test prep services in the world won’t help you if you don’t use them effectively. My suggestion is to purchase Dan Limmer’s NREMT review package. It provides test taking strategies, simulated National Registry exams and helps to identify week areas where you need to study. Limmer also has several webinars that dissect the national registry items, how to pull apart the stems and how to eliminate the distractors. Well worth it.

The second part of this is, you have to have a regimented study plan. Cramming is bad. Not studying enough is almost worse. Notice I say almost. If you don’t study enough, you won’t suffer the cognitive overload that comes with the cram session. Additionally, if you utilize one test prep, like MedicTests, you run the risk of memorizing the questions and answers rather than exploring the rationale to be able to answer like questions later on.

To qualify my opinion, I am currently an EMS educator, leading a large regional rural EMS education program and completing my M.Ed. in education technology. I sort of know what I’m talking about.
 
OP
OP
I

ickyvicky

Forum Ride Along
8
0
1
They should send results of the exam within a few days or so. While those results won't list specific questions and the correct answers, it should outline the areas of the exam where performance was both good and poor, therefore providing at least some guidance as to what should be studied/improved upon.

You will never see the exact same questions again. However, the exam is adaptive and will become very difficult the more you answer questions correctly. In fact, it will increase the difficulty until you answer incorrectly and when you do, it will ask an easier question.

I took the NCLEX-RN and it is also adaptive. My NREMTP exam was the "old" 150 question length test that went away many years ago. However, the test-taking strategies for the NCLEX and NREMT exams are going to be the same.

1) Read the question, then read ALL the answers. Go back and re-read the question with the answers in mind. Look specifically for words and phrases in the question that may have been missed. There's usually an answer that "fits" the most common misread of that question.
2) True/False questions are ones where the ENTIRE answer must be true/correct as written, otherwise it is "false" and you cannot do a "but this is true in x situation" because that is not a true "as written" answer. I call this the "yeah, but..." Don't fall for that.
3) Select All That Apply - these are essentially multiple choice T/F. Consider each "answer" line individually and it must be entirely "true" or it must be "false."
4) Once you make your selection for an answer and you're sure you've read the question correctly and chosen the most correct answer, submit your answer and forget the question you just had. It will usually have NO bearing upon the next question. If you have a situational series of questions, it will tell you so and should keep the relevant portions of the setup visible to you to refer to. Once that goes away, forget that situation series as it will have no bearing on what comes next.
5) you've already had a look at the exam style, so you now should have a better idea how to tackle it next time. Do not get complacent and do not study for this like you would for any other style exam. Most typical exams only test rote memory. Adaptive exams make you think and test your knowledge and partly readiness for entry level practice in the field.
Thank you this was really helpful! I appreciate the advice!
 
OP
OP
I

ickyvicky

Forum Ride Along
8
0
1
There are three prep services that I recommend.

Limmer education. (There are several products)
MedicTests
Navigate (only for iOS devices)

However, buying all the test prep services in the world won’t help you if you don’t use them effectively. My suggestion is to purchase Dan Limmer’s NREMT review package. It provides test taking strategies, simulated National Registry exams and helps to identify week areas where you need to study. Limmer also has several webinars that dissect the national registry items, how to pull apart the stems and how to eliminate the distractors. Well worth it.

The second part of this is, you have to have a regimented study plan. Cramming is bad. Not studying enough is almost worse. Notice I say almost. If you don’t study enough, you won’t suffer the cognitive overload that comes with the cram session. Additionally, if you utilize one test prep, like MedicTests, you run the risk of memorizing the questions and answers rather than exploring the rationale to be able to answer like questions later on.

To qualify my opinion, I am currently an EMS educator, leading a large regional rural EMS education program and completing my M.Ed. in education technology. I sort of know what I’m talking about.
That’s a good idea! Definitely going to look into all of those, thank you!
 
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