EMT with a Phlebotomy Cert.

Bubba12253

Forum Crew Member
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Hello :)

I randomly just thought of this the other day, but I'm not sure how it would work out. But would there be any benefit for me to have a phlebotomy cert?

I would like to do Medic School, but I'm finishing my senior year in college and want like to advance my skills during that one year I'll be practicing as a EMT, and I thought of what better way than to get cert. to help paramedics start IV's (not sure if I'd be allowed to, just my thought process).

Thanks!!
 

FourLoko

Forum Lieutenant
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We had a thread on this recently, you could try searching.

Otherwise, there are ER Tech jobs around here that require it. You can also find a job drawing blood.

I think they can take a while to get but if you have the time and money it might be worthwhile.
 

Tigger

Dodges Pucks
Community Leader
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Hello :)

I randomly just thought of this the other day, but I'm not sure how it would work out. But would there be any benefit for me to have a phlebotomy cert?

I would like to do Medic School, but I'm finishing my senior year in college and want like to advance my skills during that one year I'll be practicing as a EMT, and I thought of what better way than to get cert. to help paramedics start IV's (not sure if I'd be allowed to, just my thought process).

Thanks!!

If you want to be an ER tech it might be useful depending on your area. That's about it though, it will be of no use to you as an EMT on an ambulance. You will not be permitted to start IVs, it is out your scope of practice as an EMT. To start them either get your AEMT or move to a state that has allows EMTs to start IVs, which I don't believe happens in Florida. If you want to help the medic start an IV, learn how to spike a bag and setup tubing and that sort of stuff, which you don't need a class for.

Also, maybe consider advancing your knowledge before advancing your skills. There are more than enough skill monkeys in EMS, concentrate on using that knowledge that you've gained in your premed courses to help your practice as you gain experience as an EMT.
 

danjncoop

Forum Probie
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Hello

I randomly just thought of this the other day, but I'm not sure how it would work out. But would there be any benefit for me to have a phlebotomy cert?

I would like to do Medic School, but I'm finishing my senior year in college and want like to advance my skills during that one year I'll be practicing as a EMT, and I thought of what better way than to get cert. to help paramedics start IV's (not sure if I'd be allowed to, just my thought process).

Thanks!!

I work for Kaiser Harbor City, CA as an ER tech and although it was not a requirement to get hired, I am currently taking phlebotomy to raise my pay. I would highly recommend getting your phlebotomy cert if you want to work in the hospital. Like the other guy mentioned, if you plan on working as EMT on the ambulance, you won't get to use your phlebotomy skills because it is outside your scope. You will need some experience, whether it be volunteering in the hospital or working in the field, before you can get a job in the ER. Many people think you can get your EMT and get a job in the hospital. Not the case. It took me about a year and a half working on the ambulance before I got a ER job.

Phlebtomy will also help you when you learn how to start IVs as a medic. Any questions you have just ask.
 

Handsome Robb

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Phlebtomy will also help you when you learn how to start IVs as a medic. Any questions you have just ask.

I'd argue this.

Catheterizing a vein and drawing blood from a butterfly aren't the same thing. Maybe I'm challenged but skill in one doesn't equal skill in the other.
 

Tigger

Dodges Pucks
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I'd argue this.

Catheterizing a vein and drawing blood from a butterfly aren't the same thing. Maybe I'm challenged but skill in one doesn't equal skill in the other.

For what it's worth the last time I saw had blood drawn (by someone with a "plebotomist" name tag), she stuck me with a regular cath and used vacu-tainers to draw my blood. This was right before I passed out.
 

danjncoop

Forum Probie
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Obviously not the same thing. But in my opinion the skills are similar. It's easier to draw blood than to start peripheral ivs. Drawing blood helped me familiarize myself with sticking people so when medic school started I was a lot more comfortable.

I'd argue this.

Catheterizing a vein and drawing blood from a butterfly aren't the same thing. Maybe I'm challenged but skill in one doesn't equal skill in the other.
 

Handsome Robb

Youngin'
Premium Member
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Obviously not the same thing. But in my opinion the skills are similar. It's easier to draw blood than to start peripheral ivs. Drawing blood helped me familiarize myself with sticking people so when medic school started I was a lot more comfortable.

To each their own.

Me + angiocath = no problems.
Me + butterfly for a blood draw = rocket science.
 

NomadicMedic

I know a guy who knows a guy.
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I worked as a phlebotomist before and during medic school. We were not allowed to use an angio for draws, but I'd frequently straight stick an AC with a 20 or an 18. It made my IV clinicals a no brainer. :)
 
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