Do you really run, or just walk?

Sapphyre

Forum Asst. Chief
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I've run on scene ONCE, because I did not to a proper rig check at the beginning of shift, and didn't know my jump back was missing an essential piece of equipment, so, I RAN back to the rig to get it. Got yelled at for it too (inappropriate running, and the less than adequate rig check).

Because we system status post - which means we're supposed to be ready to turn wheels in something ridiculous like 30 seconds***, if we're out of the rig, we sometimes will jog, or quickly walk to the rig when we get a call. Depends on where we are, and where the call is.


*** 30 seconds is an arbitrary number, I don't know if it IS the number or not.
 

ErinCooley

Forum Lieutenant
240
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If you ever see me run, PLEASE shoot the large animal that is chasing me!
 

Buzz

Forum Captain
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I've run on scene once.

Called for abnormal labs at a nursing home turned into a cardiac arrest and the equipment was in the truck. My partner was down the hall at the nurses station getting the paperwork. Even then, it was more of a slight jog only so far that I could just shout down the hall to let him know.
 

daedalus

Forum Deputy Chief
1,784
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I've run on scene ONCE, because I did not to a proper rig check at the beginning of shift, and didn't know my jump back was missing an essential piece of equipment, so, I RAN back to the rig to get it. Got yelled at for it too (inappropriate running, and the less than adequate rig check).

Because we system status post - which means we're supposed to be ready to turn wheels in something ridiculous like 30 seconds***, if we're out of the rig, we sometimes will jog, or quickly walk to the rig when we get a call. Depends on where we are, and where the call is.


*** 30 seconds is an arbitrary number, I don't know if it IS the number or not.
Good ole LA county. Embracing SSM and all other forms of unproven tactics just because!
 

exodus

Forum Deputy Chief
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On emergent we have 60 second out the chute, and 120 seconds if we're asleep (24 only).
 

cbjfan

Forum Crew Member
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I have only run once on scene. We were delivering a baby and the medics told me they needed more towels ASAP, so once I was out of the house I ran to the truck and back, but not in the house where I could be seen by the patient and her husband.
 

AnthonyM83

Forum Asst. Chief
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I thought more about this.

I think the only times I'd run is for an ACUTE situation that required immediate intervention.
I considered it during a confirmed pediatric drowning, but realized one provider was already ahead of me, thus no longer reason for me to do so.

I am very mechanical and detached in how I run critical calls, and I very much hate the idea of rushing, running, or getting hyped up. Slow and steady wins the race.

BUT I also remind myself that there are situations where "seconds count" is true and that as long as I make that the exception rather than the rule it's okay.

Maybe???
-Long walk to a patient with CPR in progress in your site (like at a park or golf course). A controlled run may cut your time by a minute, increasing his chances by 10% if in VFib.

-Running a few steps to turn a vomiting unc. patient on their side.

-Confirmed and active severe hemorrhage.


Far and few between.
Anyway, the only time I think I've ran is for partner or officer safety issues. But under specific situations, I might.
 

Aidey

Forum Deputy Chiefette
4,800
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I don't believe I've ever run on scene, and the only time I would run on scene is if there was some immediate life safety issue.

As for seeing people put the patient on the cot and rush out to the ambulance, my service tends to do that. We have a very interesting dynamic with the local ALS fire department, and the most medics feel that the sooner we can get the patient in the ambulance and away from the fire medics the better. Fire likes to sit on scene for 20 minutes debating back and forth on what treatment they should do. Since the fire medics almost never ever transport some of them are of debateable skill. The sooner we can get them in the ambulance the better things usually go.
 

triemal04

Forum Deputy Chief
1,582
244
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One of the other areas I do want to clarify is there IS U.S. National Standards for EMS training. NREMT has NO training or educational standards as long as it meets the NHTSA national standards. Many become confused of this. R/r911
I should have explained that better, and maybe you can clarify something with the work you've done.

While NHTSA does set standards for training, and has just come out with the 3 new levels in the Scope of Practice Model (and the Education Standards that must be followed if the new levels are to be used) it still does not appear that it is MANDATORY that every state falls into line with them; that much unfortunately get's made clear in the intro to the Scope of Practice Model. So, with the educational standards being more stringent than before, it's possible that some states may still opt out of following them and continue to use their own levels. This would be where NREMT has it's impact; as you said, they test based on the national (NHTSA) standard, so that may have some effect if a state requires it's paramedics and EMT's to hold NREMT cert's.

If that's wrong then by all means clarify it. And, if you know, has there been any thought put into making it mandatory for every state to follow the same standards no matter what? While this can be both good and bad, I'm curious to know if there's work being done on it.
 

Meursault

Organic Mechanic
759
35
28
I jog to scenes when working campus EMS, and it's actually kind of nice to get an unexpected 4-minute morning run in.
My normal walking pace is fairly quick anyway, so I haven't felt the need to run on scene.

I also spent a day playing clipboard b*tch for two medics when starting with a company. While running down a handicapped ramp outside an apartment complex, I hit a wet patch, slipped, skidded, and came to rest folded into a ball under a railing. Lessons learned: 1. My boots don't have that much traction. 2. Don't run on scene. 3. Use some common sense in interpreting "orders" from medics.
 

Airwaygoddess

Forum Deputy Chief
1,924
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When I was first on the job and younger a few times, now I just walk very quickly! :)
 

DV_EMT

Forum Asst. Chief
832
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When i did my ride along... it was always walk.

personally, when i run a code though, I usually jog when its straight, walk around corners, and run up stairs. kinda balances it out.

As for nurses (esp CCU and ICU) they RUN... FAST!
 

Melbourne MICA

Forum Captain
392
13
18
Walk don't run

My understanding for walking to pts at least here in Oz has less to do with casting a veil of calm in a scene of chaos and lots more to do with the 40kg's of equipment we carry into jobs. That makes it a serious OH&S (occupational health and safety) issue.

Besides you come across looking like a sight gag if you go sprawling across the tarmac, trash your gear and get injured to boot. No winners there.
Though there's something to be said for a bit of a laugh in a grim situation.

For Meclin - as many of the guys have explained to me here on a number of occasions, there a number of models of EMS in the US and a lot of state, regional and local variation. EMS can be private, public, mixed, Police, local hospital run, fire based, part volunteer, all basic, all Paramedic you name it. As the guys have said, some works well, some not. Very eclectic to say the least.

There seems to be a lot of vested interest groups involved, differences about funding models, profit motive, loads of insurance related stuff and not unlike services anywhere, a lot of local EMS medical director school of thought influence as well. More than once I've heard the phrase here "our local doc wanted this drug on the car bcause he thinks it should be" etc.

In this respect at least there are parallels between countries.

EMS is still in evolution - its still just a pup after all.

MM
 

CAOX3

Forum Deputy Chief
1,366
3
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The only time I run is when I'm being chased. I haven't run in so long it would usually be followed by a fall, thats what I'm trying to avoid. So not so much the running but the falling is what persuades me to walk.

By the way I drive a 100,000$ ambulance and a 40,000$ truck, I dont run anywhere and usually try to refrain from walking if at all possible.:lol:

I'm including in my progression of the EMS field that every house have a garage door in it, so I dont have to walk. All buildings having more then one floor should have an elevator I can fit my ambulance in. Since we are on the subject I dont like stairs either, get rid of those too if possible.

Also all my partners should have four arms and be able to bench press four hundred pounds cause I also dont like to carry anything.

In my basement I'm in production with the creators of asteroids the Atari game to see if we can produce a hyperspace so I never have to walk or carry another patient again. (Oh boy I just dated myself)

Seriously how much time does running save you? It seems like negatives such as falling, not being able to breath and a possible MI, are not risks I'm willing to take.

If they wanted us to run we would wear sneakers not boots.
 

flhtci01

Forum Captain
319
0
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I walk and when I want to move faster, I just lengthen my stride. If I do that most people have to run to keep up.
 

mycrofft

Still crazy but elsewhere
11,322
44
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CAOX3 you brightened my day, thanks.

If you have to run, then run. There are very few situations where you will need to run. Simply put.

Melclin and all our Antipodal bretheren and sisteren, be advised your turn will come. Expenses rise, lawsuits rise, government funding takes over, and then endless layers of beancounting Aeron chair driving supercillious....imbeciles will come to oversee your work because they jawbone all the people interested in patient care into submission.

So, has Perth been taken over by Nungar EMS yet?;)
 

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