Desensitizing?

Fankango

Forum Ride Along
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I have started my EMT studies and will be trying to go on any ride alongs I can get. I don't have a problem with blood or gory sense but I do haves problem with wrist cutting. Anything that deals with long cuts between the elbow and the wrist (and people that poke their eyes, my brother use to follow me around doing that as a kid) Is kinda weird that one spot gets my stomach a little fluttery, I figure sooner or later I will come across a case that deals with injures in that area. So I want to be ready and not get my stomach turning. Any help or tricks to desensitizing my self
 

chaz90

Community Leader
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Most people will readily admit that they have one or two things that really turn their stomachs. Personally, I can't stand long, nasty clots from bloody noses and the leg fluid that comes most often in obese patients with pedal edema. If it helps at all, your specific dislike isn't overly common. I've only seen that particular injury a few times. When you're working, you'll probably find the desire to do what's needed takes precedence over your normal aversion to the injury. Time in the field will start to desensitize you as well. If you're really worried about it, look at some pictures from the internet. There are plenty of pics of long and deep lacerations out there for your viewing (dis)pleasure.
 

ghost02

CA Kern Paramedic
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*Unprofessional-untrained opinion incoming*

Why would you want to do that intentionally? I am sure it comes with experience. Whether that is good or bad is not as obvious.

That said, it seems that as you are effected by the blood and guts in specific regions due to specific trauma. That, to me, speaks to past trauma you yourself have experienced or seen, acting subconsciously to effect your body in such a way.

Please remember, I am just an EMT-B prospect, I have not even started my class; my opinion can be dismissed if it does not ring true.

-Michael
 

NomadicMedic

EMS Edumacator
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I don't like eyeball injuries. At all. They make me queasy. Luckily, I don't see many gouged out eyes. (Now, of course, I'll see one tonight...)

But, you simply learn to deal with distasteful stuff. Like Chaz says, the willingness to do something usually overrides the queasy feeling.
 

mycrofft

Still crazy but elsewhere
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*Unprofessional-untrained opinion incoming*

Why would you want to do that intentionally? I am sure it comes with experience. Whether that is good or bad is not as obvious.

That said, it seems that as you are effected by the blood and guts in specific regions due to specific trauma. That, to me, speaks to past trauma you yourself have experienced or seen, acting subconsciously to effect your body in such a way.

Please remember, I am just an EMT-B prospect, I have not even started my class; my opinion can be dismissed if it does not ring true.

-Michael
Well then write about your case rather than his. Then your opinion is always foremost. ;)

Michael, I get your point about identifying with the patient/victim, but that does not usually imply a history of observing or undergoing similar trauma. Often more subtle than that. If it DOES originate from a history of injury or abuse, then perhaps seeking counseling might be a good idea, because if it surfaces in one manner, it will affect others.

OP, stuff rarely looks like what you will see in training videos and movies and TV. And those media never convey smells nor your state of mind when confronted with them.


In either case, learn your techniques, listen to your preceptors and partners, and don't try to get into the patient's head and you will start out just fine. If not, then maybe it isn't for you.
 

Akulahawk

EMT-P/ED RN
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As has been said above, there are some things that get all of us a bit queasy. Of course, time on the job can, and often does, desensitize you to much of the more horrific stuff you'll see. Most of the time if I see something that is fairly gruesome or just plain horrible, I'll just think "that sucks..." and then get on with what I have to do. It doesn't mean that I like or enjoy what I'm doing at that particular moment, but I do what I have to do because if I don't, who will?
 

NomadicMedic

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Most of the time if I see something that is fairly gruesome or just plain horrible, I'll just think "that sucks..." and then get on with what I have to do. It doesn't mean that I like or enjoy what I'm doing at that particular moment, but I do what I have to do because if I don't, who will?
Excellent post. If we don't do it, who will.

That's the exact mindset we all seem to find when confronted with the things we see. It happens to all of us.

You may eventually feel the effects of a particularly stressful call, but my guess is that it'll be a psychological reaction to a set of circumstances, rather than an isolated injury.
 

CritterNurse

Forum Captain
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So far the only thing that has made me feel nauseous in the EMT world is feeling bone grinding on bone. Happened when I was helping to readjust a patient's ankle to a position of less discomfort. Similar to the way I felt in a vet clinic assisting during an amputation when I had to hold the limb being worked on. That final 'crunch' as the vet finished cutting through the bone always got to me.
 

STXmedic

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I just have no heart.
 

MissK

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When I first started in EMS 3 years ago vomit and the sound of someone vomiting totally freaked me out and make my stomach turn. As gross as it was, I forced myself to look at it and the person as they got sick. Over time it got better and really doesn't bother me that much anymore.
 

Hunter

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I remember a thread about the things that make us queezy, I can't find it right now because I'm on my phone but that one might give you some advice and stories from experience that shine of us have had. As for me I'm fairly new to working in the field only thing so far that gets to me is certain smells. Very specific ones though, but most other stuff doesn't bother me. I found that a surgical mask with an alcohol prep gets me through that quite well
 
OP
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Fankango

Forum Ride Along
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I have no prior trauma or injures with my wrist or elbow to cause this weak stomach, worse I have had was the removal of a third nipple. Punched the doctor when I was waking up from that surgery. Thank you all for the help. Looks like I will just be getting use to it over time. Which isn't so bad
 

phideux

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I have no prior trauma or injures with my wrist or elbow to cause this weak stomach, worse I have had was the removal of a third nipple. Punched the doctor when I was waking up from that surgery. Thank you all for the help. Looks like I will just be getting use to it over time. Which isn't so bad
Punched the doctor cutting off your third nipple?? I hate when that happens, you ain't related to that 3 breasted martian hooker from Total Recall are you??:rofl::rofl:
 

Household6

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I dislike boogers.. Not mucus or snot, but the semi-hardened, multi-colored boogers that vary in texture..

I can handle all the vomit, diarrhea or poked out eyeballs a patient can give me. But a booger will give me the willies.

Oh, I also dislike chest trauma on a lactating female. Blood and breast milk mixed together is eerie and creepy in a Rob Zombie kind of way.
 

mycrofft

Still crazy but elsewhere
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mycrofft

Still crazy but elsewhere
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I was nauseous when I watched a spinal tap training video (and went on to assist in a dozen or so, mostly on kids, without issues), and the smell from a diabetic who died of DKA and was lying in the sun in a window seat for a few hours before he was discovered.
Otherwise, too busy figuring out what to do now and next.
 

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