Am I getting fired?

hometownmedic5

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It sounds like you’re skating on thin ice with hot blades and might not make it across this particular pond. As DrParasite said, it’s not really that big a deal. I was canned from my first ems job under similar circumstances. For me, it was more of a personality issue with my first partner, who was...lets say casually intimate with the boss, so there was a lot of malarkey thrown about in regards to my competence(or alleged lack there of) and I wasn’t given much in the way of a chance to defend myself.

These things happen. Go get another job.
 

CALEMT

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I was canned from my first ems job under similar circumstances. For me, it was more of a personality issue
Same here. I would venture to guess that the OP is right on the edge and would agree with Dr. P. It’s not the end of the world like I quoted above I was canned from my first EMS job... personality issues. It’s nothing that’s going to end your career. A couple months after I got another EMS job and now I’m working for the “dark side” (FD). It’s a little blemish on a resume or job application but not a knife to the heart so to speak.
 
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sunshine girl

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Based on what your saying, I think you might be fired. Sorry if that's not the answer your wanted to hear. I've been fired for less. It's not the end of the world. Apply to other agencies tonight, just in case the worst happens (while your are still currently employed, it looks better than having a short EMS job as your first 911 position that your are no longer at)

Getting fired in EMS is not the end of the world. Some FTOs suck and go out of their way to be hypercritical of their newbies (also know this from firsthand experience). It's their way to show how they are perfect and never make mistakes.

I was let go from one county for reasons similar to yours..... Went to work for the next County over and loved half my shifts with 1 fto, and hated the other lazy POS fto (I have since heard that fto acted similarly with other newbies, resulting in them no longer being employed as well), and left that job for the private sector. I am now working back in my original county part time for a FD, as well as for a state college as a fire/EMS responder, where I make 40% more an hour than when I first started on the ambulance.

So like I said, it isn't that big of a deal (other than the immediate short term hurt and anxiety, been there and done that), what's important is how handle the next steps in your EMS career.
Unfortunately I’m going to have to move if I am indeed fired. The company I’m employed with is the sole EMS provider in my county and those surrounding me.. I just finished a six month stint commuting an hour and forty minutes to an IFT job to prepare for 911.
 

hometownmedic5

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Unfortunately I’m going to have to move if I am indeed fired. The company I’m employed with is the sole EMS provider in my county and those surrounding me.. I just finished a six month stint commuting an hour and forty minutes to an IFT job to prepare for 911.
People have been known to move for career purposes before.
 

DrParasite

The fire extinguisher is not just for show
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Unfortunately I’m going to have to move if I am indeed fired. The company I’m employed with is the sole EMS provider in my county and those surrounding me.. I just finished a six month stint commuting an hour and forty minutes to an IFT job to prepare for 911.
when I was sleeping go from the county agency during my probationary period, I found that that no other ambulance company in the county would even look at my application. I drove across two county lines to get to my next ambulance job... And this was after moving my family 8 hours from the state that I was born and raised in, and spent most of my adult life in, leaving my union job, with crappy pension and decent pay for this position...

You're 19, I'm guessing with minimal roots (no mortgage, no kids, no spouse, if you wanted to move 600 miles, of the fear of starting over, nothing's really holding you back)... If you really want to make a EMS your career, relocating for a great job should not be out of the question.
 
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sunshine girl

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when I was sleeping go from the county agency during my probationary period, I found that that no other ambulance company in the county would even look at my application. I drove across two county lines to get to my next ambulance job... And this was after moving my family 8 hours from the state that I was born and raised in, and spent most of my adult life in, leaving my union job, with crappy pension and decent pay for this position...

You're 19, I'm guessing with minimal roots (no mortgage, no kids, no spouse, if you wanted to move 600 miles, of the fear of starting over, nothing's really holding you back)... If you really want to make a EMS your career, relocating for a great job should not be out of the question.
You’re completely right. And if I’m fired I will absolutely continue to chase this no matter what it takes because at the end of the day, this is the only career I want. I’ve already begun to look into other jobs. One thing that does worry me however is that this company staffs most of California or owns the smaller companies that do. Do you think I’d get put on their no fly list for new employees, or would a different chapter still possibly hire me?
 

CALEMT

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You’re completely right. And if I’m fired I will absolutely continue to chase this no matter what it takes because at the end of the day, this is the only career I want. I’ve already begun to look into other jobs. One thing that does worry me however is that this company staffs most of California or owns the smaller companies that do. Do you think I’d get put on their no fly list for new employees, or would a different chapter still possibly hire me?
If it’s AMR more than likely no, unless you really screw up and get put on the black list. If it’s from AMR to say Doctors ambulance than not really. At my AMR op we’ve had people get fired than rehired like a year later.
 

MMiz

I put the M in EMTLife
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EMS is a funny career. Because of the nature of the job, it's almost as if people expect a confident, skilled provider from day one.

If you only knew the stupid mistakes I made in EMS. Made even more in every job and career I've had since then.

You're working as an EMT. It's generally low-skilled job with low pay and high turnover. Should you be fired, you'll be fine.

Use this as a learning experience. See if you can do more ride-alongs. Ask if your employer or EMS school will let you practice skills where you're deficient. Make an effort to create habits that will support your success. Just as pilots have checklists, maybe you need to have a quick pre-departure checklist, even if it's memorized and internal.

Transport: Partner secure and ready for transport? Doors secure? Dispatch updated on status? ...
Clearing intersections: scan for hazards, slow and have your foot over the brake pedal, change siren tone, establish eye contact with other drivers, ...

Keep us updated, and good luck!
 

taxidriver

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I started working in EMS at 19 as well. It seems that your FTO has forgotten that the purpose of an FTO is to train new employees. FTO programs would be unnecessary if EMS schools pumped out perfect EMT’s. I’m not sure what your EMT program was like, but I didn’t have a routine truck check; I didn’t play with monitors, and I didn’t learn my service area during this time. In my opinion your FTO is being unreasonable by expecting you to be proficient with ALS equipment that most EMT’s never got to touch before and expecting you to know your away around the service area on your tenth shift. My advice would be to talk to a supervisor about being assigned a new FTO. I’m sure they already spent time and money on you as so it’s in the agencies best interest to do everything they can to make sure you succeed and become productive. You’re going to make a whole bunch of mistakes but that’s the name of the game. Give yourself a hard enough time so that you’re determined to improve but not so hard that you’re losing sleep over it.
 

Trvlr

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Like others have stated, if you get fired, it’s not a big deal. Life moves on and you just keep pushing forward. You stated you’re on your tenth training shift, how many training shifts do they give you? In regards to the mistakes you listed:

A. I’ve seen very experienced people leave doors open, even leaving a door open while pulling out of the bay (ask me how I know…) . Just do your “circle of safety” and include making sure everything is closed. I even do this prior to leaving the bay now…

B. This one is a big one, but you’re just learning to drive code; since I doubt you did it doing IFT. As stated, just drive like no one can see you, change tones prior to entering intersections. Follow your companies policy to the letter on this, this is where you may end up in court or dead depending on your actions. If your rigs have Opticom, know that drivers will get confused with lights changing so quick.

C. Does your rig have GPS? Drive around your service area in your off time. Know the main roads your hospitals are on. In the end this isn’t too critical people miss exits, can’t move over, etc. It happens. I’ve been told by several medics. “I won’t know how long it took to get to the hospital as long as you make it a safe, smooth ride.”

D. Make that check list in your head of what gear was used, and needs to be cleaned while you’re changing linens at the hospital. Have a rig check-list for when you go on duty, it’ll make everything easier.

E. Take notes on what you’re struggling with, and work on those skills on your downtime.

Honestly I know this is a stressful situation, you’re young, and this is probably your first “serious” job. Don’t be too hard on yourself, I know it’s hard not to be critical; as Oscar Wilde said “Experience is simply the name we give our mistakes.
 
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sunshine girl

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So the latest update is: they’re having me come in to meet with the Clinical Edication Manager on Thursday. So I guess I’m... cautiously optimistic? I’m really hoping they’re leaning more towards the option of trying to address the problems and help me correct them before firing me. I plan to bring my notepad with notes on my mistakes and how I plan to address them on my own time to go over with him, but do any of you have ideas on other strategies I might use to keep my job?
 

Lo2w

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So the latest update is: they’re having me come in to meet with the Clinical Edication Manager on Thursday. So I guess I’m... cautiously optimistic? I’m really hoping they’re leaning more towards the option of trying to address the problems and help me correct them before firing me. I plan to bring my notepad with notes on my mistakes and how I plan to address them on my own time to go over with him, but do any of you have ideas on other strategies I might use to keep my job?
I think you're on the right track. Be professional, don't talk **** about the FTO. Be proactive in how you cam address issues etc.
 
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sunshine girl

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Thank you everyone for the advice and support. I just met with management and they are indeed letting me go. They allowed me to resign instead of being fired and encouraged me to get even more experience and reapply in six months.They were both very kind and seemed to genuinely want me to try again which was nice. They told me they have many employees who’ve failed training and been successful the second time around. I’m a little bit heartbroken but hoping I can make the best of it and work as an ER tech or go back to IFT for a while.
 

RocketMedic

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Where are you at in the world?
 

Lo2w

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I'm curious what the training process actually consisted of. Best of luck going forward!
 

RocketMedic

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@sunshine girl
Coastal CA I dunno much about, but if you can commute, Liberty Ambulance in Kern County/Ridgecrest or Hall are both options. @VentMonkey @DesertMedic66 @LACoGurneyjockey @NPO @Aprz are good resources.

If you're truly as free as a bird and mobile, there's a LOT of good options in Texas and the Midwest.

Also, have you considered the military?
 

NPO

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@sunshine girl
Coastal CA I dunno much about, but if you can commute, Liberty Ambulance in Kern County/Ridgecrest or Hall are both options. @VentMonkey @DesertMedic66 @LACoGurneyjockey @NPO @Aprz are good resources.

If you're truly as free as a bird and mobile, there's a LOT of good options in Texas and the Midwest.

Also, have you considered the military?
Can you elaborate on the opportunities in Texas? I've never heard of that being a good place for EMS before.
 

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