Accelerated EMT – B Program in December (14 Days)

Tom Perroni

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Accelerated EMT – B Program

Dates: December 1st, 2011 – December 14th, 2011 (14 Days)

Time: 9am-6pm

Location: Commonwealth Criminal Justice Academy, 1380 Central
Park Blvd, Suite # 208 Fredericksburg, Va. 22401

Prerequisites:

1. Student must be 16 years of age or older before the start of the course.

2. Hold an approved cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) course at the beginning date of the course. This certification must also be current at the time of state testing. (CCJA will offer this training before this course for hose enrolled and paid who need this training at no cost.)

Cost: $1,200.00 (This does not include Books and State or National test fees)

Coordinator: Charles A. Williams NREMT-P

Registration: Call (540) 322-3000 or e-mail ccjatraining@gmail.com

Books:

Required text:
Mosby's EMT-Basic Textbook Revised 2nd Edition Revised
W. Stoy, T. Platt, D. Lejeune and the Center for Emergency Medicine, published by Mosby

Required text:
Mosby's EMT-Basic Workbook 2nd Edition
W. Stoy, T. Platt, D. Lejeune and the Center for Emergency Medicine, published by Mosby.

Program description:

Emergency Medical Technician – Basic (4 year certification)

The Emergency Medical Technician – Basic course is designed to provide training to prepare an individual to function independently in a medical emergency. This course provides the basic knowledge and skills needed to provide basic life support (BLS) care and is required to progress to more advanced levels of pre-hospital patient care.

The course requires a minimum of 111 hours of classroom and skills instruction and 10 hours of Clinical/Field rotations for a total of 121 hours of training.

Virginia Certification requires successful completion of a written and practical skills examination. This course is designed to train individuals to serve as a vital link in the chain of the health care team.

Student will be eligible to set for Virginia EMT-Basic exam Note: reciprocity available to the take National Registry Exam after gaining Virginia certification.

This includes all skills necessary to provide emergency medical care as an attendant-in-charge with a basic life support ambulance service or other specialized rescue service.

Upon successfully completion of the training program, the student will be capable of performing the following functions:

(1) Recognize the nature and seriousness of the patient’s condition or extent of injury to assess requirements for emergency care.

(2) Administer appropriate emergency care to stabilize the patient’s condition.

(3) Lift, move, position and otherwise handle the patient in a way as to minimize discomfort and further injury.

The EMT-Basic curriculum will be based upon the DOT National Standard Curriculum for the EMT-Basic (1994 edition) and the 2002 Supplemental Airway Modules for the 1994 EMT-Basic National Standard Curriculum. The EMT-Basic will be trained and proficient in all skills described in the DOT National Standard Curriculum for the EMT-Basic (1994 edition) and the 2002 Supplemental modules for the EMT-Basic: National Standard Curriculum.

This program has a 92% first time test pass rate!

To register or for more information Contact:

Tom Perroni (540) 322-3000 / (540) 846-7088
ccjatraining@gmail.com
www.ccjatraining.com

Recommended Hotel:
Fredericksburg Hospitality House
www.fredericksburghospitalityhouse.com
2801 Plank Rd
Fredericksburg, VA 22401
(540) 786-8321
CCJA Training Rate: $70.00 per night single occupant.


__________________
Tom Perroni
Doc "Gwedo"

"Trust me, I'm a medic"

The “State of the Art” in medicine is constantly changing –unlearn outdated medical training @ CCJA.
 

Tigger

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This is not to be construed as an attack on your training center. The college I currently attend has us taking one class at a time, 5 days a week, 3 hours+ classroom time per day, for 3.5 weeks. This schedule works fine, and the college is well regarded. I'm not going to throw stones over a 2 week basic class.

My question is in regards to price: why $1200? My class had 30 more hours and was half as much...Is there something I am missing here?
 
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Tom Perroni

Tom Perroni

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I must be missing something.....:wacko:

5 days X 3 hours a day = 15 hours

15 hours X 3.5 weeks = 52.5 hours

My program is 121 hours of class room and clinical rotation and approved by Virginia OEMS.

George Washington University Charges $5,000.00 here for the same program however it is 1 semester long. But if you call them looking for an accelerated program they will send students to us.

I would love to know the name of a college that would charge $600.00 for a 3.5 week course. I'm still paying off student loans:rolleyes:

Have you completed the course yet? I am confused you said you are in class now but your avatar says EMT-Basic?
 
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Tigger

Dodges Pucks
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I must be missing something.....:wacko:

5 days X 3 hours a day = 15 hours

15 hours X 3.5 weeks = 52.5 hours

My program is 121 hours of class room and clinical rotation and approved by Virginia OEMS.

George Washington University Charges $5,000.00 here for the same program however it is 1 semester long. But if you call them looking for an accelerated program they will send students to us.

I would love to know the name of a college that would charge $600.00 for a 3.5 week course. I'm still paying off student loans:rolleyes:

Have you completed the course yet? I am confused you said you are in class now but your avatar says EMT-Basic?

You're only missing something because I was rather unspecific, sorry about that. The college I was talking about is where I am getting my undergrad done. It's a liberal arts college that teaches its academic classes on a block schedule. My point was that I don't see any issue with the "short but intense" model, you just have to know that it is right for you. My classes are a lot more than $1200, but please don't make me think of that. :sad:

I've been a basic for two years, I took the class over the course of a semester at my undergrad college. It was $600, and that's relatively high for the area, from what I understand. Just curious why your class is twice that. Before you ask, I went to a quality program with a great and competent instructor that had access to excellent equipment and clinical placement opportunities with a hospital network, 911 EMS provider, and 911 ALS FD.

Again, not an attack, just curiosity.

Also, GW offering it for 5k? Really? That's not even comprehensible.
 

crazycajun

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Accelerated EMT – B Program

Dates: December 1st, 2011 – December 14th, 2011 (14 Days)

Time: 9am-6pm

Location: Commonwealth Criminal Justice Academy, 1380 Central
Park Blvd, Suite # 208 Fredericksburg, Va. 22401

Prerequisites:

1. Student must be 16 years of age or older before the start of the course.

2. Hold an approved cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) course at the beginning date of the course. This certification must also be current at the time of state testing. (CCJA will offer this training before this course for hose enrolled and paid who need this training at no cost.)

Cost: $1,200.00 (This does not include Books and State or National test fees)

Coordinator: Charles A. Williams NREMT-P

Registration: Call (540) 322-3000 or e-mail ccjatraining@gmail.com

Books:

Required text:
Mosby's EMT-Basic Textbook Revised 2nd Edition Revised
W. Stoy, T. Platt, D. Lejeune and the Center for Emergency Medicine, published by Mosby

Required text:
Mosby's EMT-Basic Workbook 2nd Edition
W. Stoy, T. Platt, D. Lejeune and the Center for Emergency Medicine, published by Mosby.

Program description:

Emergency Medical Technician – Basic (4 year certification)

The Emergency Medical Technician – Basic course is designed to provide training to prepare an individual to function independently in a medical emergency. This course provides the basic knowledge and skills needed to provide basic life support (BLS) care and is required to progress to more advanced levels of pre-hospital patient care.

The course requires a minimum of 111 hours of classroom and skills instruction and 10 hours of Clinical/Field rotations for a total of 121 hours of training.

Virginia Certification requires successful completion of a written and practical skills examination. This course is designed to train individuals to serve as a vital link in the chain of the health care team.

Student will be eligible to set for Virginia EMT-Basic exam Note: reciprocity available to the take National Registry Exam after gaining Virginia certification.

This includes all skills necessary to provide emergency medical care as an attendant-in-charge with a basic life support ambulance service or other specialized rescue service.

Upon successfully completion of the training program, the student will be capable of performing the following functions:

(1) Recognize the nature and seriousness of the patient’s condition or extent of injury to assess requirements for emergency care.

(2) Administer appropriate emergency care to stabilize the patient’s condition.

(3) Lift, move, position and otherwise handle the patient in a way as to minimize discomfort and further injury.

The EMT-Basic curriculum will be based upon the DOT National Standard Curriculum for the EMT-Basic (1994 edition) and the 2002 Supplemental Airway Modules for the 1994 EMT-Basic National Standard Curriculum. The EMT-Basic will be trained and proficient in all skills described in the DOT National Standard Curriculum for the EMT-Basic (1994 edition) and the 2002 Supplemental modules for the EMT-Basic: National Standard Curriculum.

This program has a 92% first time test pass rate!

To register or for more information Contact:

Tom Perroni (540) 322-3000 / (540) 846-7088
ccjatraining@gmail.com
www.ccjatraining.com

Recommended Hotel:
Fredericksburg Hospitality House
www.fredericksburghospitalityhouse.com
2801 Plank Rd
Fredericksburg, VA 22401
(540) 786-8321
CCJA Training Rate: $70.00 per night single occupant.


__________________
Tom Perroni
Doc "Gwedo"

"Trust me, I'm a medic"

The “State of the Art” in medicine is constantly changing –unlearn outdated medical training @ CCJA.

Sorry Tom but programs like yours are exactly why EMS needs an overhaul. 8 hours a day for two weeks is not near enough time to train any one. By the way our class is 152 hours classroom and 40 ride time. The cost is $700 including text and workbooks.
 
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dstevens58

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Curiosity asks, just what does $1,200 buy you other than the training? (books not included).

Others may be adapted to this type of learning environment, but I wasn't. I like my standard class structure. It's intense (medic-level) with one day a week.
 

Tigger

Dodges Pucks
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Sorry Tom but programs like yours are exactly why EMS needs an overhaul. 8 hours a day for two weeks is not near enough time to train any one. By the way our class is 152 hours classroom and 40 ride time. The cost is $700 including text and workbooks.

Eight hours a day for two weeks is 112 hours. Eight hours a week for 14 weeks (close to a college semester, i.e. how most basic classes are taught) is also 112 hours. How is there not enough time to train someone in the accelerated model?

The classroom time is the same. Surely you do not dispute this. Given this, why can someone not take it all at once? Is this program for everybody? No, everyone learns differently. But it might work for some.

The reason that I shy away from the accelerated courses is generally due to the reputation of the teaching institution and the patch factory style of instruction. But, if an accelerated program is held to the same academic standards as a "traditional" program, what is the difference?

Anecdotally, it is a very different way to learn, and I can speak to that having spent the last 2.5 years of my life learning in such a manner. If you like the material, its great. I love studying government, so to be able to study government for almost a month without worrying about other courses is awesome.
 

JPINFV

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I would love to know the name of a college that would charge $600.00 for a 3.5 week course. I'm still paying off student loans:rolleyes:

The EMT course I took several years ago was only $40 plus books. Unless there's something honestly special, I can't imagine paying more than a couple hundred dollars for an EMT course, little less over a thousand.

http://www.coastlinerop.schoolloop.com/
 
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Tom Perroni

Tom Perroni

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Sorry Tom but programs like yours are exactly why EMS needs an overhaul. 8 hours a day for two weeks is not near enough time to train any one. By the way our class is 152 hours classroom and 40 ride time. The cost is $700 including text and workbooks.

This may not be for everyone! However we have a 92% state pass rate and a 100% NREMT-B pass rate.

In Virginia the course is 121 Hours......So If you take the class one night a week for months or everyday for weeks...... what is the problem. As long as the hours are satisfied.

We started this program for the Military and then expanded it for "Open Enrollment" we have been doing it for over 2 years now as an "Open Enrollment course" 4 years in general. I don't think we would still be in business if it did not work?

Not sure what the issue is we follow the same DOT guidlines as every other course?

It is not for everyone and if you don't think it will work for you I understand!

But I don't think you can judge a program you haven't taken or blame the problems of EMS in general on My school. We have what I think is a good pass rate...However we all know that the REAL learning comes from OJT.

When you go to a Doctor you have no idea if he/she was first in his/her class or last!

When you get your NREMT-B card it does not have your score on it how do you know who is competant and who is not.

It all comes down to how they operate in the field.
 

JPINFV

Gadfly
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Not sure what the issue is we follow the same DOT guidlines as every other course?

To be fair, the DOT guidelines are terrible. High on cook book, low on understanding what is actually being done. Hence things like the stupidity of the medical assessment practical requiring high concentration oxygen, or automatic failure.

But I don't think you can judge a program you haven't taken or blame the problems of EMS in general on My school.
True. Accelerated courses being feasible is just a symptom of very simplistic requirements. However...
However we all know that the REAL learning comes from OJT.
2 issues.

1. If most of the "real learning" is on the job training, then what is deficient about the current curriculum requirements? Especially since there's nothing stopping your school from exceeding the minimum.

2. Why are EMS education programs failing to lay down a proper foundation? If the "real learning" isn't happening in the classroom, then the program is simply building a house on sand.

As an educator, the above two issues are squarely within your control. You don't have to follow the pack.
When you go to a Doctor you have no idea if he/she was first in his/her class or last!
Oh, can we please please please compare the rigors of medical school and EMT class? How many "accelerated physician" programs can you think of? Heck, I can't think of a single medical school in the US that bases it's curriculum on anything other than "years." Even still, there's only a couple of medical schools offering 3 year tracks (as in 2 or 3 out of well over a hundred), and those tracks are strictly limited to physicians entering primary care as well as removing basically all vacation time. You won't find any medical school saying, "Hey, look at us, we just meet the 4,000 hours (at least the statutory education requirement for California) required of us."

Heck, I don't even know, nor do I care, what the number of hours of instruction my current school provides. Why? Because it's irrelevant.


Also, in medical school grades and licensing exam scores matter when it comes to residencies. Most students aren't looking to just squeak by.
 
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TacEMT

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I personally don't see a problem with accelerated EMT programs. Theres actually a two week intesive EMT bootcamp course near where I am at and I know people that have went through the program and successfully completed the National registry and state requirements. An intensive course is not for everyone but I think it just comes down to the individuals themselves. If your really dedicated you will do fine regardless if its a 2 week, 10 week, 6 months, or 9 month. course. In fact I think intensive courses are better because when you do get tested, you will be tested on something you learned a few weeks or few days ago, rather then a few months ago. Then there is the problem if the students can actually absorb all that information in the short amount of time. EMT-B is not a easy by any means so hard work is required. Its up to the students to make sure they actually understand the information and not fall behind, since everything kinda builds off the basics. Intensive courses are good for people that don't have the time to make such a long comittment to school, such as they need the job right away. Also its good for those who let their license laspse and just need a good refresher for them to pass the national registry instead of a full course.
 

crazycajun

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This may not be for everyone! However we have a 92% state pass rate and a 100% NREMT-B pass rate.

In Virginia the course is 121 Hours......So If you take the class one night a week for months or everyday for weeks...... what is the problem. As long as the hours are satisfied.

We started this program for the Military and then expanded it for "Open Enrollment" we have been doing it for over 2 years now as an "Open Enrollment course" 4 years in general. I don't think we would still be in business if it did not work?

Not sure what the issue is we follow the same DOT guidlines as every other course?

It is not for everyone and if you don't think it will work for you I understand!

But I don't think you can judge a program you haven't taken or blame the problems of EMS in general on My school. We have what I think is a good pass rate...However we all know that the REAL learning comes from OJT.

When you go to a Doctor you have no idea if he/she was first in his/her class or last!

When you get your NREMT-B card it does not have your score on it how do you know who is competant and who is not.

It all comes down to how they operate in the field.

Sorry if you are offended but you will never convince me that teaching 8 modules testing on each, practical skills and a final exam can be done efficiently in 14 days. Another problem is your comment about REAL learning comes from OJT. That is a ridiculous statement and again why EMS needs a serious overhaul. Stop worrying about the dollar in your pocket and start worrying about the quality of personnel we are putting in the streets. Also you keep stating percentage rates. Why don't you tell us exactly how many people have attended your program and how many have actually passed the test in REAL numbers. Then tell us how many actually took the NREMT and passed in real numbers.
 

abckidsmom

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There's a problem with study time, too. If you spend 120 hours in class over 2 weeks, at what point are you studying to get this information permanently into your brain?
 

BrushBunny91

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I am currently 12 weeks into my 16 week EMT program and I would not be the same EMT if I took an accelerated program. The amount of time and understanding to not only grasp but truly understand the concepts takes a lot longer then 14 days.
Accelerated programs treat EMT like its just one of those obstacles you need to quickly complete and move on to paramedic school.
EMT should be taught and understood rather than just finish.
 

Tigger

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There's a problem with study time, too. If you spend 120 hours in class over 2 weeks, at what point are you studying to get this information permanently into your brain?

The last two classes I took at school were chemistry classes with three hours of lecture and three hours of lab five days a week.

It sucked, but if you suck it up for a month there is plenty of time to study and we have research showing that taking a single class in an "intense" format does not make one less likely to retain information compared to a student on a semester plan.


Sent from my out of area communications device.
 

crazycajun

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The last two classes I took at school were chemistry classes with three hours of lecture and three hours of lab five days a week.

It sucked, but if you suck it up for a month there is plenty of time to study and we have research showing that taking a single class in an "intense" format does not make one less likely to retain information compared to a student on a semester plan.


Sent from my out of area communications device.

You are talking about ONE subject for a month. We are talking about EIGHT modules which are basically separate subjects over 14 days. You still need to learn practicals, learn how to word assessments and somehow retain all of that information. Schools like this simply pump the answers to a test in you over and over again. You may very well pass but your actual knowledge of what a EMT actually does will not be sufficient. Furthermore Tom claims in his signature to be a "Medic" however nothing on his site states such.
 
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Tom Perroni

Tom Perroni

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You are talking about ONE subject for a month. We are talking about EIGHT modules which are basically separate subjects over 14 days. You still need to learn practicals, learn how to word assessments and somehow retain all of that information. Schools like this simply pump the answers to a test in you over and over again. You may very well pass but your actual knowledge of what a EMT actually does will not be sufficient. Furthermore Tom claims in his signature to be a "Medic" however nothing on his site states such.


Tigger,

I fear no matter what anyone says the "crazycajun" has made up his/her mind. No worries this course is not for everyone If you read between the lines It would appear that he/she is an EMT-I student and may have gone to a longer course and that may or may not have worked for him/her.


crazycajun,

In response to your question about my Medic status....I am a Virginia ALS provider and you can verify that here:

http://www.vdh.virginia.gov/OEMS/index.htm

However my full name is Thomas J. Perroni

I am also an “ASHI” ACLS, PALS Instructor, ITLS Advanced Provider, USSOCOM TCCC/LTT Instructor, TEMS Instructor, I also teach RSI. Advanced Trauma Training …..etc.etc. but that isn’t on my web site either.

If you’re having problems in you’re I/85 or I/99 course let me know ...you are not too far away and I would allow you take the training for free. However all I ask in return is an AAR the good the bad the ugly.

I can assure you were are not teaching the test.

But come see for yourself ...However if you won't come check us out for free then don't talk carp about a program you have not taken nor have no knowledge of.

P.S. You don’t have to keep telling me you are sorry…I don’t mind having these discussions. Even after several years of doing this I am not so arrogant as to think I know everything, I am very open minded and willing to learn new things or a better way to do something.
 

Tigger

Dodges Pucks
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You are talking about ONE subject for a month. We are talking about EIGHT modules which are basically separate subjects over 14 days. You still need to learn practicals, learn how to word assessments and somehow retain all of that information. Schools like this simply pump the answers to a test in you over and over again. You may very well pass but your actual knowledge of what a EMT actually does will not be sufficient. Furthermore Tom claims in his signature to be a "Medic" however nothing on his site states such.

Are you serious? Chemistry is not just chemistry. There many, many different topics to study that are in many cases barely related to one another. I spent one week doing nothing but acid base reactions and then the next week working on thermo and electro chemistry. The two weeks were not at all related, yet it's still in the same class.

If the eight modules of EMT class are so different, how can they be taught as a single class? Let's face it, they are not.. Much of what is taught is interrelated throughout the class.

I applaud your desire to increase the education standards in EMS, and you know that I agree with you when it comes to furthering the minimum standard of ambulance based providers.

What you are doing here is not helping that. You are making completely baseless accusations about one program's quality of education. Furthermore, you are unilaterally declaring a proven system of education to be worthless to EMS, without providing any evidence what so ever. The opinion that you hold that these programs to produce subapar providers is perhaps anecdotally true, but you can prove it to be the case for this specific program.

I have no stake in this discussion. I have been to Virginia once, and have no knowledge of this institution. I just cannot stand when people get up on their high horse and declare something to be unworkable, despite having no experience or evidence to support such a claim. I know that this manner of education works, I'm living it. I can't say it works for anyone else though.
 

Cawolf86

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If you’re having problems in you’re I/85 or I/99 course let me know ...you are not too far away and I would allow you take the training for free. However all I ask in return is an AAR the good the bad the ugly.

Seems like a great offer.
 

crazycajun

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Tigger,

I fear no matter what anyone says the "crazycajun" has made up his/her mind. No worries this course is not for everyone If you read between the lines It would appear that he/she is an EMT-I student and may have gone to a longer course and that may or may not have worked for him/her.


crazycajun,

In response to your question about my Medic status....I am a Virginia ALS provider and you can verify that here:

http://www.vdh.virginia.gov/OEMS/index.htm

However my full name is Thomas J. Perroni

I am also an “ASHI” ACLS, PALS Instructor, ITLS Advanced Provider, USSOCOM TCCC/LTT Instructor, TEMS Instructor, I also teach RSI. Advanced Trauma Training …..etc.etc. but that isn’t on my web site either.

If you’re having problems in you’re I/85 or I/99 course let me know ...you are not too far away and I would allow you take the training for free. However all I ask in return is an AAR the good the bad the ugly.

I can assure you were are not teaching the test.

But come see for yourself ...However if you won't come check us out for free then don't talk carp about a program you have not taken nor have no knowledge of.

P.S. You don’t have to keep telling me you are sorry…I don’t mind having these discussions. Even after several years of doing this I am not so arrogant as to think I know everything, I am very open minded and willing to learn new things or a better way to do something.

Tom I am a current EMT-I and in a paramedic degree program. I have been in EMS for more than 20 years and have seen many "Accelerated Programs". With that said I would like to know the actual number of attendees and graduates from your program and how many actually took the State test and the NREMT test. I think this is a fair question if you are that sure of your program.
 
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