Where to obtain background check for class?

NPO

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Too little too late.

The best source is your instructor. There are no fast online background checks.

Good luck.
 

DesertMedic66

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If you do it now, it might be good for next semester...
 

NPO

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Thanks for your response. My instructor does my background check?
No. They will tell you where to get one for your program. Usually it's a local law enforcement agency or private investigator.
 

DesertMedic66

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Thanks for your response. My instructor does my background check?
Yes or no. Your instructor would be your best source of information as your program may have contracts set up with a specific company or require a certain level of check.

For all my background checks my instructors have clearly stated who we were to do the check through.
 
OP
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Weeooh

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Well, poop. At least it was only worth 5 pts. I guess I'll ask on Monday.
Thanks, all.
One more question... Did y'all really remember everything you learned in class, or did you find the majority of your learning to be on the job?
I'm more of a learn by doing kind of person, and I'm nervous about my ability to retain all the info from class enough to apply it when it matters. Anyone else have the same jitters while they were in training? Thanks again.
 

NPO

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Everyone feels nervous and like they have more to learn. That's normal. Your classroom training will be a foundation for your field training.

Also, not to be an ***, but if you want to succeed in class, don't fall behind on anymore assignments. Not because of the letter grade, but because you will become overwhelmed.
 
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Weeooh

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Everyone feels nervous and like they have more to learn. That's normal. Your classroom training will be a foundation for your field training.

Also, not to be an ***, but if you want to succeed in class, don't fall behind on anymore assignments. Not because of the letter grade, but because you will become overwhelmed.
That's absolutely true. I was working 10-12 hour days, 5 days per week, in my first week in class and have just now, at the end of the second week, got caught up. Now, I only work 3 days per week (still long hours) and am taking weekends off, in hopes that this will be enough for me to keep up. I really hope I pass this course so that I can change careers. Unfortunately with kids and bills, I can't lessen my hours anymore than I have. When I'm not working, I'm studying. That's about it.
 

DesertMedic66

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You are lucky that a background check was only worth 5 points. For the EMT and paramedic programs I attended, not completing the background check on time meant you could not do your clinical hours which meant you could not complete the program and would dropped from it.

You will learn a lot in class. Some of that information you will forget because you won’t use it in the field. You will remember the information you need to because you will frequently utilize it.
 

mgr22

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One more question... Did y'all really remember everything you learned in class, or did you find the majority of your learning to be on the job?
I'm more of a learn by doing kind of person, and I'm nervous about my ability to retain all the info from class enough to apply it when it matters. Anyone else have the same jitters while they were in training? Thanks again.
1. What you learn in school is an important foundation for what you'll learn in the field.
2. I've only known one person who remembered everything he read, and he was a freak of nature. Most of us need repetition and reinforcement to learn.
3. Being nervous about mastering new skills is normal. To eliminate all nervousness, I think you'd have to not care about what you're doing. Not caring works against the whole patient-provider thing.
 

NPO

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3. Being nervous about mastering new skills is normal. To eliminate all nervousness, I think you'd have to not care about what you're doing. Not caring works against the whole patient-provider thing.

EMT school is somewhere near that peak, and paramedic midterms are somewhere near that valley. The goal is to graduate paramedic school slightly past "this is more complicated than you might think."
dk-effect.jpg
 

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