West Los Angeles college(UCLA) medic program

Gambino198

Forum Ride Along
6
0
1
Hello,

Does anyone have any insight into this medic program? Perhaps you’ve been through it, word of mouth, etc. This is an open ended question, any feedback of the program is greatly appreciated. I am looking to move down to Southern CA from NorCal, and this program caught my eye. I am going to request a visit which will hopefully help answer some questions, but I am interested in what some of you may say. From what they require(prerequisites etc), including the month long prep course, looks great on the surface. Anyways, let me know your thoughts. Thank you.
 

DesertMedic66

Forum Troll
11,264
3,443
113
It looks good on the surface until you factor in the cost of the program +$10,000 and LAFD and LACoFD are not known for being great medics as a generalization.
 

VentMonkey

Family Guy
5,719
5,034
113
Kind of similar to what @DesertMedic66 said. As a former trainer/ preceptor who’s dealt with some of their former students, it’s what you make of it. Some of them were squared away, others not so much. Then again, I still believe the student makes the medic intern/ medic-to-be more than the school they attend.

I don’t think DFI/ UCLA’s quite what they once were, and yes you’ll end up doing an internship in the notoriously dubious Los Angeles County—with either City Fire, a smaller department, or County Fire—either way, you may luck out and get decent preceptors.

It is a hefty price to pay for paramedic school. Bakersfield College (Kern County just north of LA), and Mt. Sac (Los Angeles County) both offer community college paramedic programs with CC prices, and/ or an associates option. If I had to do it all over I would at the very least opt for my associates.

Whatever you do, try and stay away from PTI.
 
OP
OP
G

Gambino198

Forum Ride Along
6
0
1
Thank you both for taking the time to respond to this, both of your feedback is much appreciated! The part I find interesting is the course length(looks to be 7-8 months) where programs in Northern CA are 15-18 months. Being medics, would you say the longer more spread out programs as opposed to the shorter more condensed programs put out a better prepared medic?(in general). I realize it always depends on the individual, but when you see graduating classes coming into the workforce, do the longer programs tend to have more dialed in medics?
 

VentMonkey

Family Guy
5,719
5,034
113
I don’t think that the length of the program has anything to do with how “dialed” someone is. If you want to be good at something, you’ll find ways to be good at something.
 

DesertMedic66

Forum Troll
11,264
3,443
113
Thank you both for taking the time to respond to this, both of your feedback is much appreciated! The part I find interesting is the course length(looks to be 7-8 months) where programs in Northern CA are 15-18 months. Being medics, would you say the longer more spread out programs as opposed to the shorter more condensed programs put out a better prepared medic?(in general). I realize it always depends on the individual, but when you see graduating classes coming into the workforce, do the longer programs tend to have more dialed in medics?
It all depends on the student. There are ones who come out of a hybrid course who are very good for being new medics but there are also bad ones. There are ones who come out of full length programs who are good providers and others who are bad. It is all about what you put into it.
 
OP
OP
G

Gambino198

Forum Ride Along
6
0
1
It all depends on the student. There are ones who come out of a hybrid course who are very good for being new medics but there are also bad ones. There are ones who come out of full length programs who are good providers and others who are bad. It is all about what you put into it.
That is some good information to chew on, and it makes complete sense. Thank you for taking the time to respond to this. I gotta keep doing some research of the programs down there and check them out for myself. Much appreciated, be safe out there.
 
OP
OP
G

Gambino198

Forum Ride Along
6
0
1
I don’t think that the length of the program has anything to do with how “dialed” someone is. If you want to be good at something, you’ll find ways to be good at something.
That is good to know, I appreciate your honesty. I have had some medics tell me to shy away from condensed courses because they tend to be “factories” that try to pump em out there fast. If the instruction is good though, I don’t have too much of an issue with said situation. Anyways, thank you for your input, be safe out there.
 

Colt45

Forum Lieutenant
119
29
28
That is good to know, I appreciate your honesty. I have had some medics tell me to shy away from condensed courses because they tend to be “factories” that try to pump em out there fast. If the instruction is good though, I don’t have too much of an issue with said situation. Anyways, thank you for your input, be safe out there.

I get how a quicker course can seem to "pump" people out of the program, but 8-9 months is plenty of time to learn the paramedic scope and curriculum if you actually put in the effort and study hours required outside the classroom. For those that don't actually read the chapter and coast through the program doing the minimal amount required usually have a hard time passing the NR and it shows. Obviously having some solid instructors is a part of that but I wouldn't let people scare you away from an accelerated course (8-9 months) if you are going to be a good student.
 

DesertMedic66

Forum Troll
11,264
3,443
113
Look for programs that will work with your budget. With community colleges you are often able to use student aid tools to help with cost. Commute cost, cost of living in that area, cost of food. LA is not known to have the lowest cost of living or gas prices.

Look at the schedule of the program. Yes a course may be completed in 8 months however what is the schedule going to look like? Will you have enough time to study, work, relationships, family, time off?

Make sure the program is accredited for NREMT/state.

If you are planning on getting a degree then you may want to look into colleges that offer an AS in EMS/Paramedicine.

Look into the staff at each location. What is their level of training (MD/DO, RN, RT, Medic, PA, etc) and their education (PhD, master degrees, bachelor degrees, associates degree, none).

Then you can start to find out about the reputation of the school/program. The program should be able to provide you with the program pass rates and the NREMT pass rates. Another big thing you want to find out if for your internship and clinical time is if they will find locations and times for you or will you have to seek those out yourself. We have had students who live in NorCal have to travel down to SoCal for their field internship time.
 
OP
OP
G

Gambino198

Forum Ride Along
6
0
1
Kind of similar to what @DesertMedic66 said. As a former trainer/ preceptor who’s dealt with some of their former students, it’s what you make of it. Some of them were squared away, others not so much. Then again, I still believe the student makes the medic intern/ medic-to-be more than the school they attend.

I don’t think DFI/ UCLA’s quite what they once were, and yes you’ll end up doing an internship in the notoriously dubious Los Angeles County—with either City Fire, a smaller department, or County Fire—either way, you may luck out and get decent preceptors.

It is a hefty price to pay for paramedic school. Bakersfield College (Kern County just north of LA), and Mt. Sac (Los Angeles County) both offer community college paramedic programs with CC prices, and/ or an associates option. If I had to do it all over I would at the very least opt for my associates.

Whatever you do, try and stay away from PTI.
During the students internship, is the role of the preceptor solely to grade and sign off the student? Or is there teaching and coaching involved?
 

CALEMT

The Other Guy/ Paramaybe?
4,521
3,345
113
During the students internship, is the role of the preceptor solely to grade and sign off the student? Or is there teaching and coaching involved?

As a current paramedic student whose going through internship I can say for a fact that the role of a preceptor is to ensure success of their student. They're not there to just grade you and sign you off. Most of what a preceptor does is teach and coach. After all you are a student whose still learning and not a paramedic with X amount of years. Now on the flip-side it's the job of the student to soak up the info and to teach in return. After all medicine is a ever evolving field and curriculum that was taught 10 years ago may not be the case now.
 
OP
OP
G

Gambino198

Forum Ride Along
6
0
1
As a current paramedic student whose going through internship I can say for a fact that the role of a preceptor is to ensure success of their student. They're not there to just grade you and sign you off. Most of what a preceptor does is teach and coach. After all you are a student whose still learning and not a paramedic with X amount of years. Now on the flip-side it's the job of the student to soak up the info and to teach in return. After all medicine is a ever evolving field and curriculum that was taught 10 years ago may not be the case now.
Thank you for the quick response! That’s good stuff. Good luck with your internship, be safe out there.
 

VentMonkey

Family Guy
5,719
5,034
113
During the students internship, is the role of the preceptor solely to grade and sign off the student?
It shouldn’t be. If it is, contact your program coordinator.
Or is there teaching and coaching involved?
Yes, in my opinion, the better preceptors try and impart some wisdom and learning opportunities when at all possible.
 
Top