State vs. Nation Registry

Cameron

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I posted this question in another forum that was sort of about this topic and got no response, search showed up nothing.

What is the main difference between state registered and nation registered?
Is there different restrictions on age?
Different things you can do being state vs. nation?

And all other things you can think of!

Regards,
- Cameron
 

JJR512

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In some states or jurisdictions, you only need the national registry certification to function; for example, Washington DC. In other states, you need a specific state certification; for example, Maryland. In MD, if you have the NR, you cannot function as an EMT. However, in many (maybe most?) jurisdictions, having the NR smooths the reciprocity process; in other words, it makes it easier for you to get certified in another jurisdiction. For example, in Maryland, if you have the NREMT-B certification, you'd only need to take the EMT-B refresher course (a 24-hour course) to get certified as a Maryland EMT-B.

To my knowledge, having an NR certification does not change your scope of practice. So it does not change what you can or can't do.
 
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Cameron

Cameron

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Thanks for the quick response!

I understand now, sort of. :p. Do you know where I can find a website of the restrictions/policys Per state?






<---- My state is New York

Regards,

-Cameron
 

bstone

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The NREMT has a letter about this on their website, written by a law firm.
 

JJR512

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Thanks for the quick response!

I understand now, sort of. :p. Do you know where I can find a website of the restrictions/policys Per state?






<---- My state is New York

Regards,

-Cameron

Umm...nope, I don't know that, sorry.

Since you are a student (according to your profile), perhaps your instructor could be of some help in that regard? Although I'm sure someone with more knowledge on the subject than I have will be along soon to provide more help...
 
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Cameron

Cameron

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The NREMT has a letter about this on their website, written by a law firm.

I've been on their site and have not been able to find anything on it, just searched again... I must be blind :wacko:. Any chance you have a link?

@JJR512 I guess I will have to ask my instructor the next time I see him, I was looking to see if I could get a answer before then. Thanks though.
 

94H

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Last I checked NY is not a National Registry State. You need to take an EMT class, get certified by a state and then transfer it over to NY. Or take a NYS approved course and pass the test.
 

bstone

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Cameron

Cameron

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Thank you for the last two posts. They are greatly appreciated.

In a private PM from someone, they mentioned for NREMT you need to be 18 (Which I was aware of), they also said it was for NYS too, can anyone confirm this?

Regards,
-Cameron
 

Tigger

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So far as I am aware, the National Registry does not certify anyone per-say. It is your state EMS office that gives you your certification. In many states, passing the NR test is enough, and the state office will certify you after you complete some paperwork. This is how it worked in Colorado, at least for me.

In other states, like Massachusetts, the NR helps but it doesn't guarantee that you get your certification. I still had to take the MA written test, but since I passed a practical test the NR approved, I didn't have to take the MA practical test.

A coworker told me that the NR does nothing for you in NYS, not sure if that's true but I thought I'd pass it along.

In regards to age, this EMT school in NY says 18 too...

http://www.timeremt.com/custom3.html
 

TransportJockey

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The only way a NR cert is a cert to practice are on US Government installations (ie Military bases) and in DC since it's not a state.
 

JJR512

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My instructor made a point of explaining on the first day of class that EMT-Bs are certified, and EMT-Is and EMT-Ps are licensed.

I once posted a comment here in which I referred to being a licensed EMT-B, in which I did not specifically mean to indicate being "licensed" as an EMT-B, but I just happened to use that word erroneously in the same manner that many people erroneously interchange "licensed" with "certified". And some people were quite happy to jump all over me about that mistake.

The NREMT's letter on this topic says that a certification is, "1. [A] voluntary process; 2. By a private organization; 3. For the purpose of providing the public information on those individuals who have successfully completed the certification process (usually entailing successful completion of educational and testing requirements) and demonstrated their ability to perform their profession competently."

The letter also goes on to say, "Licensure, on the other hand, is the state’s grant of legal authority, pursuant to the state’s police powers, to practice a profession within a designated scope of practice. Under the licensure system, states define, by statute, the tasks and function or scope of practice of a profession and provide that these tasks may be legally performed only by those who are licensed. As such, licensure prohibits anyone from practicing the profession who is not licensed, regardless of whether or not the individual has been certified by a private organization."

All persons who want to function in Maryland as an EMT-B must take and pass a test by MIEMSS, the Maryland Institute for EMS Systems. MIEMSS is an independent state agency and is the state's regulatory agency for EMS. When one passes the test, one is issued a card with an identification number and a statement of level (EMT-B, for example), affiliation, expiration date, etc.

Given the NREMT's two statements defining certification and licensure, and the fact that MIEMSS is a state agency, not a private organization, does it not then appear that (at least in MD) all EMT-Bs are licensed and not certified?
 

bstone

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Your instructor is clearly only speaking on behalf of MD. In IL, where I am a Basic, is a license. In CT where I am an Advanced EMT it is a certification. In NH where I had an Intermediate card it was a license.
 

JJR512

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Your instructor is clearly only speaking on behalf of MD. In IL, where I am a Basic, is a license. In CT where I am an Advanced EMT it is a certification. In NH where I had an Intermediate card it was a license.

Yes, he was speaking about Maryland. But none of what you said answered my question, though.
 

bstone

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A license is usually created by a state through an act of legislation. If there isn't legislation on the books to license an EMT then they are usually certified. The only way to know for sure is to check into the EMS statutes and see if it says one or the other.
 
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Cameron

Cameron

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Thank you all above whom are helping me understand the difference.

@mjrett
Went to the map and clicked New York, it brought me to a invalid address.


And one of my other main questions,
Does anyone know if there is a waiver for age? Even if its only a year.
 

EMT11KDL

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I have a license for basic level idaho, use to have colorado.

idaho: an emt b, a, or paramedic can do nothing for a patient unless they are working under a doctors license. Which means they have to have a medical director
 

EMT11KDL

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Thank you all above whom are helping me understand the difference.

@mjrett
Went to the map and clicked New York, it brought me to a invalid address.


And one of my other main questions,
Does anyone know if there is a waiver for age? Even if its only a year.

no waiver for age for NR
 

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