Spring-loaded IV caths... WHY!?!?!

irish_handgrenade

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Started working for a new service recently, and they use the spring-loaded IV caths. I feel these are completely unneccesary. They are like the old school sharps, that didn't have a protective sheath after using them but I have been having trouble with them. Any advice from people that use these? I want to practice with them, but have not really gotten the opportunity to do so.
 

FLEMTP

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Started working for a new service recently, and they use the spring-loaded IV caths. I feel these are completely unneccesary. They are like the old school sharps, that didn't have a protective sheath after using them but I have been having trouble with them. Any advice from people that use these? I want to practice with them, but have not really gotten the opportunity to do so.

Yeah.. get familiar with them.. and get good at using them. They are MUCH safer.. and have saved me a couple of times in critical situations where I would have more than likely ended up with a needle stick had the safety cath not been used. They are an adjustment like anything else new.. but I love them.

I prefer to pierce the vein, insert the needle a millimeter or so further to make sure the catheter is in the vein, then grasp the hub of the catheter and slide it off the needle into the vein while holding the needle still and in place. It seems to work much easier that way, then once the needle is removed from the catheter I press the safety button to retract the needle. If you retract the needle with the needle still in the catheter and there is blood present, you will usually end up with a bit of blood spray because of the speed in which the needle is retracted.

Hope this helps!
 

mgr22

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You might want to rotate the hub of the catheter before you attempt a stick. Those push-button caths sometimes adhere to the rest of the unit, making it difficult to advance the cath once you're in the vein.

This is the work-around recommended by the manufacturer.
 

trevor1189

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Medics around here used to use them, then the hospital switched cath styles. Now they use the passive one where when the needles is removed from the cath a little metal guard snaps over the end.

I've never done an IV, but I can tell you I liked the old ones better when the medic isn't near the sharps container and has to pass it to you to dispose of. The needle inside a big plastic tube seemed much safer than the needle with a little piece of metal over the end.
 

piranah

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we use the non-spring loaded protectacaths....as you advance the cath the needle is retracted into the housing completely enclosing it....very safe,reliable and easy.
 

TransportJockey

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I love the spring loaded ones. It's all my old hospital bought. I'm not as big a fan of the non spring loaded ones though.
 

Dominion

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I love the spring loaded caths, I used them in all my clinical rotations and had a much easier time working with them (I have large hands). I usually carry a few 18's and a few 20's in my bag when I'm on my ride time. The service I work for carries the small ones with the metal guard, the service I ride with carries both but only 20GA of the spring retractable variety. Good to have a few around I feel they're easier to handle and are MUCH safer in the back of a truck. Having TRIED to remove the needle...it's pretty difficult and that case is pretty shatter resistant. Took a hammer directly to the casing to break it open and even then it only broke in the middle, the needle was still protected.
 

reaper

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They are excellent Caths. The biggest issue some have, is hitting the button on accident while inserting. That goes away, as you get more practice with them.
 

rescue99

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Started working for a new service recently, and they use the spring-loaded IV caths. I feel these are completely unneccesary. They are like the old school sharps, that didn't have a protective sheath after using them but I have been having trouble with them. Any advice from people that use these? I want to practice with them, but have not really gotten the opportunity to do so.

The IAEP was instrumental in lobbying for safe needle systems. You can partially blame it on EMS for wanting them :)
 

Shishkabob

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They are excellent Caths. The biggest issue some have, is hitting the button on accident while inserting.

I can't tell you how many times I've done that. Heck, my first time with the cath I was like "Oooh what does this button do?!"


I hated going to different hospitals for my medic clinicals... every one has different equipment and it makes you seem like you have no clue what you're doing when you're trying to learn the new stuff.



You might want to rotate the hub of the catheter before you attempt a stick. Those push-button caths sometimes adhere to the rest of the unit, making it difficult to advance the cath once you're in the vein.

I do this for every style cath I use... just a habit I picked up from one of my instructors so that it won't stick when trying to advance it in to the vein.
 

EMTinNEPA

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I LOVE the spring loaded caths. While the initial venipuncture is a little more difficult than with the safety caths, I find it much easier to thread the spring-loaded caths into the vein.
 

Needles17

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Yes they are nice but beware when you press that button. Blood splashes out. If you hold a 4x4 in front of the spring loaded system after you have it patent, press the button and look at the blood on the 4x4.
 

TransportJockey

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Yes they are nice but beware when you press that button. Blood splashes out. If you hold a 4x4 in front of the spring loaded system after you have it patent, press the button and look at the blood on the 4x4.

That's something I've never actually noticed. Next time I have the opportunity to use one I'll have to try and see
 

cookiexd40

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ive used both the spring loaded and the safe easy cath. i like either one the cath seems to advance a little more easily for my with the spring loaded kind
 

audreyj

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I'm not a huge fan of those either. I prefer the ones that come with the little metal nub over the needle. I don't mind them I just don't have much experience with them. I actually really prefer the style that is pretty much a saline lock all in one. No holding pressure after you remove the needle, no need to prep a saline lock, all you need is this angio and a flush and you're golden. Needle tip is btwn two large hard plastic 'caps'.

Unfortunately we're stuck with whatever the hospital gives us to restock our rigs.
 

lightsandsirens5

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Love the spring loaded ones. But I have only got to use one once or twice. We are still carrying the stone age straight-up-no-frills-no-safety needles. :wacko:
 

Akulahawk

EMT-P/ED RN
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I've used a couple different styles of safety caths. Once I got the technique that worked best for that particular style, I've never had an issue with them. Heck, I never have really had issues with the non-safety caths either... I just had to be a bit more careful about preventing needlestick.
 

rhan101277

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I love the spring loaded ones to. The service I work at still use the jelco where you actually have a unprotected needle after catheter insertion :glare:
 
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