Medical Diagnosis

CityEMT212

Forum Crew Member
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Hello EMS Family,

So I've been recently diagnosed (4 months ago) with a small medical diagnosis that has slightly affected my life, but not by much. I can still live, work, socialize, do things with friends and family, and still have as much a normal life as possible. However, my EMT CERT is still valid until 2021. And I planned on applying to local places for standby events, or per diems in September of this year. Hopefully, the issue will be either easier to control or fully subsided by then. My concern is, do I mention it to a possible employer?

Thanks,

CityEMT212
 

hometownmedic5

Forum Asst. Chief
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Maybe, maybe not. There's about a million variables and I'm not keen on playing twenty questions, so if you want opinions that are relevant, you're going to have to tell us what your condition is and how, if at all, it alters your ability to do your job.
 

DrParasite

The fire extinguisher is not just for show
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Does it affect your ability to do the job? than no.

Once you get hired, you might want to mention it to a trusted supervisor, in case there is an issue results from your diagnosis (for example, you can't come to work or perform your job), but unless there is a reason for it, I'd keep personal stuff personal until you have a reason not to.

But def don't mention it until you are offered the job, as the information likely won't help you, and could be used against you by a potential employer.
 

CityEMT212

Forum Crew Member
58
5
8
Maybe, maybe not. There's about a million variables and I'm not keen on playing twenty questions, so if you want opinions that are relevant, you're going to have to tell us what your condition is and how, if at all, it alters your ability to do your job.
GAD - General Anxiety Disorder. Sometimes, not every day, I get slight anxiety where I need to just stop for a moment, take a deep breath and keep on going. It was worse when it started, but now I've been able to cope with it. It doesn't interfere with my current job. I work in a clinic, and am patient-facing every day. I also work with doctors who need interpretation, and insurance companies daily. I'm able to do the job I have now, but I have had anxiety attacks while at work, unfortunately.
 

CityEMT212

Forum Crew Member
58
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Does it affect your ability to do the job? than no.

Once you get hired, you might want to mention it to a trusted supervisor, in case there is an issue results from your diagnosis (for example, you can't come to work or perform your job), but unless there is a reason for it, I'd keep personal stuff personal until you have a reason not to.

But def don't mention it until you are offered the job, as the information likely won't help you, and could be used against you by a potential employer.
Used against me? As in, even blacklisting me to other EMS agencies?
 

DrParasite

The fire extinguisher is not just for show
4,856
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Used against me? As in, even blacklisting me to other EMS agencies?
no; but they can decline to hire you out of a false concern that your condition would hinder you at the job. they might not even tell you that is the reason, but you won't get the job, which isn't fair to you.

don't tell them unless they ask, and don't let it prevent you from doing the job. Having an anxiety attack isn't a deal breaker in EMS; however, some might think it makes you unable to do the job (which is total BS, but old stigmas do still exist).
 

CityEMT212

Forum Crew Member
58
5
8
no; but they can decline to hire you out of a false concern that your condition would hinder you at the job. they might not even tell you that is the reason, but you won't get the job, which isn't fair to you.

don't tell them unless they ask, and don't let it prevent you from doing the job. Having an anxiety attack isn't a deal breaker in EMS; however, some might think it makes you unable to do the job (which is total BS, but old stigmas do still exist).
Great, thanks.
 

berkeman

Forum Lieutenant
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I planned on applying to local places for standby events, or per diems in September of this year.
GAD - General Anxiety Disorder. Sometimes, not every day, I get slight anxiety where I need to just stop for a moment, take a deep breath and keep on going.
It doesn't interfere with my current job. I work in a clinic
Have you dealt with any emergent patients yet? If so, was the GAD still manageable? What kind of standby events are covered in the shifts you would like to work?

I work standbys pretty often, and they can range from mellow (conventions, big company picnics, etc.) to crazy (large ethnic dances with lots of alcohol, Ironman Triathlons in hot weather, etc.). I've had a number of emergent transports in the busier shifts, and have had to use emergent lifts and carries several times to get my Pt out of a bad situation and closer to our medical treatment area. I've have had a number of Pts who were circling the drain as we treated them and loaded them up for transport, and dealing with their medical issues quickly and effectively was very important.

If you haven't had any emergent Pts yet, you might want to consider some ride-alongs with your local Fire Department or an ambulance service. There's a certain amount of "stress inoculation" that can happen as you deal with more and more emergent Pts, and you may find that after a few such contacts, you are getting better and more comfortable with them. Or you may find that you really don't like such contacts, in which case you may want to stick with the clinical side.

Hope it works out well for you either way.
 
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