How do I get over my emetophobia?

Sandiistaken123

Forum Probie
26
1
3
I found an EMS certification program that takes ages 16 and up, and I want to start in fall. However I have a mild fear of vomit. What's the best way to manage this?

(Please be respectful) ❤️
 

mgr22

Forum Deputy Chief
1,657
816
113
I found an EMS certification program that takes ages 16 and up, and I want to start in fall. However I have a mild fear of vomit. What's the best way to manage this?

(Please be respectful) ❤️
Are you afraid of vomit or of vomiting?
 

nerf

Forum Ride Along
3
9
3
It's definitely better to talk to someone qualified for this but my advice is just getting exposed and used to it. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
Just don't be asking others to throw up or throw up yourself to get exposure though.
 

mgr22

Forum Deputy Chief
1,657
816
113
Both, I am mostly afraid of the sickness that comes with the vomiting patient.
Many EMS patients are sick, not hurt. If you treat them, you might get sick, too. None of that will amaze your friends or make you a better person.

You can be afraid of sickness and enjoy many things. EMS probably isn't one of them.
 

Seirende

Washed Up Paramedic/ EMT Dropout
891
429
63
It's definitely better to talk to someone qualified for this but my advice is just getting exposed and used to it. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
Just don't be asking others to throw up or throw up yourself to get exposure though.

Exposure therapy with a qualified professional is an excellent route. Just exposure in and of itself can be helpful, but actual exposure therapy includes coping skills training and slowly increasing levels of exposure
 

Carlos Danger

Forum Deputy Chief
Premium Member
4,513
3,239
113
I found an EMS certification program that takes ages 16 and up, and I want to start in fall. However I have a mild fear of vomit. What's the best way to manage this?

(Please be respectful) ❤️
You will figure it out. Dealing with vomiting patients can be unpleasant, but focusing on your responsibilities helps a lot. It gets easier the more you deal with with it.
 

ffemt8978

Forum Vice-Principal
Community Leader
11,031
1,478
113
You will figure it out. Dealing with vomiting patients can be unpleasant, but focusing on your responsibilities helps a lot. It gets easier the more you deal with with it.
Especially when you learn to point their head the other way. Don't ask how I know.
 

Carlos Danger

Forum Deputy Chief
Premium Member
4,513
3,239
113
Like most people, I've never especially enjoyed seeing or smelling vomit. But it has never especially bothered me, and unlike many HEMS folks, I never got nauseous flying in the old non-air conditioned BO-105's, even on hot summer days during aggressive maneuvers. Until one especially hot and humid summer day, we picked up a large women who was ejected (fortunately with no serious injuries) from a rollover MVC on the interstate and who by her own admission had gorged herself on the buffet that was provided at the roadside establishment she had left shortly before our encounter. Despite our routine provision of 25 mg phenergan IV (routine for us back in those days), she began to vomit profusely (while being secure strapped to a backboard and headlocks) shortly after lift off from the scene. Being seated in the position that I was, leaning across her to reach the suction meant placing my own face within inches of the column of vomit that was being ejected from her mouth. I retched and heaved reveal times and really thought I was going to puke all over her, but I managed not to. Suctioned her pharynx well and made sure she was able to maintain her airway and all was fine. But any time I hear someone talk about about being nauseous at the site or smell of vomit, there are two encounters that I think of and this is one of them.
 

Phillyrube

Leading Chief
188
115
43
I can do death, blood, twisted intestine eviscerations, childbirth and poopy pants.

But someone gets the dry heaves, the backdoors open and the driver behind the box get surprised.
 
OP
OP
S

Sandiistaken123

Forum Probie
26
1
3
Like most people, I've never especially enjoyed seeing or smelling vomit. But it has never especially bothered me, and unlike many HEMS folks, I never got nauseous flying in the old non-air conditioned BO-105's, even on hot summer days during aggressive maneuvers. Until one especially hot and humid summer day, we picked up a large women who was ejected (fortunately with no serious injuries) from a rollover MVC on the interstate and who by her own admission had gorged herself on the buffet that was provided at the roadside establishment she had left shortly before our encounter. Despite our routine provision of 25 mg phenergan IV (routine for us back in those days), she began to vomit profusely (while being secure strapped to a backboard and headlocks) shortly after lift off from the scene. Being seated in the position that I was, leaning across her to reach the suction meant placing my own face within inches of the column of vomit that was being ejected from her mouth. I retched and heaved reveal times and really thought I was going to puke all over her, but I managed not to. Suctioned her pharynx well and made sure she was able to maintain her airway and all was fine. But any time I hear someone talk about about being nauseous at the site or smell of vomit, there are two encounters that I think of and this is one of them.
Oh, that’s nasty! Did she vomit from the overindulgence or the injuries? (Given she was ejected)
 

sharpe15

Forum Ride Along
6
1
3
I had the same issue (although much older than you). It's not uncommon in the industry, I've seen very experienced medics and EMT's start gagging. There are ways to deal with it, don't let it stop you.
 
Top