EMT and Dispatcher

John Trammell Jr

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ok so im not doing EMR class due to the fact that i will not be employed most likely. I will do the EMT class instead. But if i get hired i was told that i will start out part time... but they said that you typically get decent shifts every month but it depends on the needs of the company. So i was wondering how hard would it be to work at 2 EMS companies? Or As a dispatcher on the side. They get paid more. And the company said you can work as a dispatcher for them on the side and i was told that alot of EMTs do that. So would this be hard to do?
 

mgr22

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Of course, this is all heavily dependent on your location and age, the latter of which looks too young to be hired. Some of my best friends have been dispatchers -- I even married one -- and many of them are/were also EMTs and paramedics. Dispatching is hard work, but a different kind of hard than hands-on patient care. Communication skills and the ability to visualize what you can't see are very important.
 
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John Trammell Jr

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Of course, this is all heavily dependent on your location and age, the latter of which looks too young to be hired. Some of my best friends have been dispatchers -- I even married one -- and many of them are/were also EMTs and paramedics. Dispatching is hard work, but a different kind of hard than hands-on patient care. Communication skills and the ability to visualize what you can't see are very important.
I wont apply until after I graduate in a few months lol
 

Specialized

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First off, you could probably merge these two threads together.

Second, being a dispatcher (may) require(s) different certifications than say being an EMT. You say you won't take your EMR course but you will take EMT? EMR is a stepping stone to EMT. I don't know where you live but in my county most people get their EMR out of the way then go into EMT.

The only way to find out if the job is hard is to go apply and see for yourself. I don't think others here can answer that for you. Best of luck.
 
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John Trammell Jr

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First off, you could probably merge these two threads together.

Second, being a dispatcher (may) require(s) different certifications than say being an EMT. You say you won't take your EMR course but you will take EMT? EMR is a stepping stone to EMT. I don't know where you live but in my county most people get their EMR out of the way then go into EMT.

The only way to find out if the job is hard is to go apply and see for yourself. I don't think others here can answer that for you. Best of luck.
county doesn’t require EMR to take an EMT class thank god lol and yes in my state its a 4 day class for dispatch
 

DrParasite

The fire extinguisher is not just for show
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you really don't need to start multiple threads for what seems like the same topic. You can simply add to the existing ones you already have. That being said....
So i was wondering how hard would it be to work at 2 EMS companies?
very easy to work for 2 EMS companies, however the hard part involves working PART TIME for two companies. the issue is giving enough availability to both companies to get shifts, and not ending up double booking yourself when they both assign you to work the same day. But it is (and many people do) work for two companies, typically one full time and one part time.
Or As a dispatcher on the side. They get paid more. And the company said you can work as a dispatcher for them on the side and i was told that alot of EMTs do that. So would this be hard to do?
are you working as a 911 dispatcher, or ambulance company dispatcher? the 911 dispatcher typically has additional training requirements, while the ambulance company dispatcher usually doesn't. in either case, yes, it's very easy to work as an EMT for one place and a dispatcher at another (I did it myself). Dispatching is much different that working on an ambulance, and many field personnel think it's really easy until they actually try doing it. Than they see it's not as easy as they originally thought.

What state are you in? when you say it's a 4 day dispatch class, it sounds like that's just the EMD portion, and you might need to take the 911 portion (which is typically 5 days) if it's a prerequisite

EMR is a stepping stone to EMT. I don't know where you live but in my county most people get their EMR out of the way then go into EMT.
Please don't mislead this boy by providing incorrect information. EMR is NOT a stepping stone to EMT, nor is it required to be an EMR before you take the EMT class. You don't need to "get EMR out of the way" before you go to EMT, because not having EMR is not in your way preventing you from taking an EMT class.

I'm not sure why most people in your county take EMR first, other than they don't need EMT for their positions, so why spend the time studying all that fancy book learning, but I would wager everyone in your county could simply take EMT and skip EMR with no issues.
 

KnightRider

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Our EMS dispatchers make $9/HR and typically have NO prior medical training or EMS experience. EMT-B's make $12/HR, Medics make I think $14/HR or $16/HR.

Like Dr.P just said, skip the EMR nonsense and go straight to EMT school.

If you are talking being a 9-1-1 Dispatcher, that pays more and requires more training.

It sounds as if you are trying to work for 2 different private EMS companies. I know our company wont allow you to do that because of account info, etc. We sign a "do not compete clause" upon hire. Meaning, if I get word our company is getting a new account and the details of it, I wont run off to another private company and disclose the details or knowledge of it to try to undermine my company. If we are discovered working for 2 private companies, you can be fired or worse, sued for being in violation of the "do not compete clause."
 

DrParasite

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I know our company wont allow you to do that because of account info, etc. We sign a "do not compete clause" upon hire.
You know, I didn't think about this, mainly because I only worked private IFT for about 3 months, and since then, it's only been 911 (and even in those three months, there was no exclusivity requirement ,as I worked at one place for a week before switching to a better paying crappy private IFT service). Many in the 911 service work FT for one agency and part time at others. I actually know several coordinators who spend 5 days in the office, and work a few nights or weekends on a truck to maintain clinical competency in a real, not simulated, environment.

In fact, if a company mandated a "do not compete contract " or said I couldn't work at another company while working for them, or couldn't work for any of their competitors (even if they had better pay, better pay, or better conditions) anytime in the future, as a condition of employment, than there is a high probability that I would pass on that job offer. Unless that are going to pay me in excess of 80,000 a year with no OT, than I might say they can buy my exclusivity for that price

But that's just me, and I know I am in a good enough position where I don't need to accept the first offer that is thrown at me, so your experience might be different.
 

luke_31

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It sounds as if you are trying to work for 2 different private EMS companies. I know our company wont allow you to do that because of account info, etc. We sign a "do not compete clause" upon hire. Meaning, if I get word our company is getting a new account and the details of it, I wont run off to another private company and disclose the details or knowledge of it to try to undermine my company. If we are discovered working for 2 private companies, you can be fired or worse, sued for being in violation of the "do not compete clause."
Most places that have do not complete clauses typically have been unable to actually enforce them for a line worker like an EMT or paramedic. They really are for marketers and supervisor and above. Granted companies can terminate you for it but a good attorney can get around the no compete clause. I remember reading something regarding do not compete clauses and how the workers who actually produced the product could not be held responsible for going against their company's do not compete clause as it limited the employee's ability to work in the same field after they left their present company.
 
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John Trammell Jr

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you really don't need to start multiple threads for what seems like the same topic. You can simply add to the existing ones you already have. That being said....very easy to work for 2 EMS companies, however the hard part involves working PART TIME for two companies. the issue is giving enough availability to both companies to get shifts, and not ending up double booking yourself when they both assign you to work the same day. But it is (and many people do) work for two companies, typically one full time and one part time.are you working as a 911 dispatcher, or ambulance company dispatcher? the 911 dispatcher typically has additional training requirements, while the ambulance company dispatcher usually doesn't. in either case, yes, it's very easy to work as an EMT for one place and a dispatcher at another (I did it myself). Dispatching is much different that working on an ambulance, and many field personnel think it's really easy until they actually try doing it. Than they see it's not as easy as they originally thought.

What state are you in? when you say it's a 4 day dispatch class, it sounds like that's just the EMD portion, and you might need to take the 911 portion (which is typically 5 days) if it's a prerequisite

Please don't mislead this boy by providing incorrect information. EMR is NOT a stepping stone to EMT, nor is it required to be an EMR before you take the EMT class. You don't need to "get EMR out of the way" before you go to EMT, because not having EMR is not in your way preventing you from taking an EMT class.

I'm not sure why most people in your county take EMR first, other than they don't need EMT for their positions, so why spend the time studying all that fancy book learning, but I would wager everyone in your county could simply take EMT and skip EMR with no issues.
Thanks. And yea its an EMD and it pays $12 an hour starting out
 

KnightRider

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You know, I didn't think about this, mainly because I only worked private IFT for about 3 months, and since then, it's only been 911 (and even in those three months, there was no exclusivity requirement ,as I worked at one place for a week before switching to a better paying crappy private IFT service). Many in the 911 service work FT for one agency and part time at others. I actually know several coordinators who spend 5 days in the office, and work a few nights or weekends on a truck to maintain clinical competency in a real, not simulated, environment.

In fact, if a company mandated a "do not compete contract " or said I couldn't work at another company while working for them, or couldn't work for any of their competitors (even if they had better pay, better pay, or better conditions) anytime in the future, as a condition of employment, than there is a high probability that I would pass on that job offer. Unless that are going to pay me in excess of 80,000 a year with no OT, than I might say they can buy my exclusivity for that price

But that's just me, and I know I am in a good enough position where I don't need to accept the first offer that is thrown at me, so your experience might be different.
Yea, if they made some kind of conditions for post-employment, I wouldnt work for someone like that. I think people should be free to look for better options or their current employer can make life better there to retain their staff.
 

Specialized

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you really don't need to start multiple threads for what seems like the same topic. You can simply add to the existing ones you already have. That being said....very easy to work for 2 EMS companies, however the hard part involves working PART TIME for two companies. the issue is giving enough availability to both companies to get shifts, and not ending up double booking yourself when they both assign you to work the same day. But it is (and many people do) work for two companies, typically one full time and one part time.are you working as a 911 dispatcher, or ambulance company dispatcher? the 911 dispatcher typically has additional training requirements, while the ambulance company dispatcher usually doesn't. in either case, yes, it's very easy to work as an EMT for one place and a dispatcher at another (I did it myself). Dispatching is much different that working on an ambulance, and many field personnel think it's really easy until they actually try doing it. Than they see it's not as easy as they originally thought.

What state are you in? when you say it's a 4 day dispatch class, it sounds like that's just the EMD portion, and you might need to take the 911 portion (which is typically 5 days) if it's a prerequisite

Please don't mislead this boy by providing incorrect information. EMR is NOT a stepping stone to EMT, nor is it required to be an EMR before you take the EMT class. You don't need to "get EMR out of the way" before you go to EMT, because not having EMR is not in your way preventing you from taking an EMT class.

I'm not sure why most people in your county take EMR first, other than they don't need EMT for their positions, so why spend the time studying all that fancy book learning, but I would wager everyone in your county could simply take EMT and skip EMR with no issues.
Not to butt heads, but at our local community college, passing EMR is required in order to go on to EMT. Unless you can provide proof of some prior medical training. Most people I know go through the college to get certified. Does everyone go through the college? Nope, do they have to? Of course not. I'm sure it's different in other states and counties.
 

TransportJockey

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Not to butt heads, but at our local community college, passing EMR is required in order to go on to EMT. Unless you can provide proof of some prior medical training. Most people I know go through the college to get certified. Does everyone go through the college? Nope, do they have to? Of course not. I'm sure it's different in other states and counties.
That's probably one of the more asinine requirements I've heard of for basic
 

DrParasite

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What he said.

Sounds like the college just wants to get more money out of you. I can guarantee you it's not a state requirement, and it's truly unnecessary.
 

KnightRider

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What he said.

Sounds like the college just wants to get more money out of you. I can guarantee you it's not a state requirement, and it's truly unnecessary.
A college trying to extort and squeeze every cent out of you that they can?? Say it aint so?....lol
 

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