Difficult new partner

BasicFirst

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Okay so, I am fairly new to a private company providing 911 service to a large town. My background is 8 years (6 bls, 2 als). I was fortunate enough to take part in an elite para-military training program that is taught by a very experienced ems team. It was drilled into us the importance of having SOPs in place for many many scenarios including on-scene management- they have come up with these SOPs sadly out of many bad incidents of pt and EMS illness, injury and deaths.
needless to say, these "rules" are as good as gold for me and anyone who as been thru this training...
So here I am at this private company...I get this newer medic as a partner (about a year total bls & als). I come in at 0655 to find him & about 6 bls members talking in the crew room...he finally comes out to check our truck out at 0715, asking what is left to do...:glare:
Our first call (I'm the tech) we get on scene, he runs into the house-no communication with me, no equipment, nada:unsure:....it's a older lady who's fallen(no biggie here). He cuts me off & starts interviewing her (while standing over her strattled). I send him for a LB & collar bag. I do my rapid exam, he comes back & you guessed it: Starts HIS rapid exam....I had to literally tell him (nicely) to step off. at which point he backs up crosses his arms, laughs & says "okay boss".....we finally get transporting & hes on his phone-while responding @ about 75mph.
We proceed for the rest of the 24 to not talk out of mutual distain.-I over heard him complaining that he's got more seniority & he's the "lead" on all traumas....& how our boss will be getting an e-mail over my actions:sad:. The boss & supervisors I've noticed will only really take action on people who interfere with the bottom line ($$$).
Should I "go with the flow" of the half -a** private service, or try to teach them what I know to be a better way? I feel as though it will be said upon deaf ears with this know-it-all type bunch.
Sigh.....
Any ideas on dealing with a new medic/company like this???
 

Sasha

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Instead of pouting in silence like a child try talking to him first about your issues.
 

Sasha

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Ps because you swear your way is better you seem to be the know it all here. You are at a new company, they may do things differently doesnt mean its wrong. Protocol for every little thing is not better, but more rigid and will throw you for a loop when you have something that doesnt fit in your nice little box.
 

Linuss

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'Tis why I hate double medic trucks... you have both vying for control instead of one clearly 'in charge'.
 
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BasicFirst

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This is exactly the point I'm trying to have come across...
There are roles but it's a team effort. For the driver medic perhaps they should fall back & stay primarily in that role. I.E.obtaining rx, hx, all, demo, watching the techs back.
 

fast65

Doogie Howser FP-C
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I probably wouldn't have come onto an internet forum and *****ed about it first of all. It's amazing what having a talk with your partner will do, it seems you don't like his lack of communicating on-scene, however, you're not communicating with him about issues that you have, try that first.

I'm going to agree with Sasha, don't go making suggestions on things they need to change, that's not the way you want to start off with a new company. Just because the "para-military" way that you were taught seems better to you, doesn't mean it will work for them. Each company has it's own way of doing things, give it some time to sink in before you try changing things.
 
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BasicFirst

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Perhaps I wasn't explaining myself clearly. My training is reguarded as the best by outsiders, from within they make point to say they *strive* to be the best.
I did let emotion get the best of me, it was a mutual "screw you".
Furthermore, sitting down and having a calm, clear conversation with this particular medic seems out of the question. Primarily due to the public discussion he had with the rest of the base as well as the e-mail already sent & the body language and general attitude portrayed...
 

mycrofft

Still crazy but elsewhere
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Lay back and let him take the lead.

PS: you come ventilate here all you want, just do't do that then let us tell you how to auger your career into the dirt.;)

Checklist:
  • Any genderal, racial or cultural/ethnic issues?
  • Was he told to "show you the ropes"?
  • Does he act professionally in some ways
Scope out the setting, find out what their culture is and keep ears peeled for your buddy's status in the organization. Some folks wind up orienting others because they volunteer to out of a desire to teach but are not trained or inclined to do so properly. Innocently ask how his earlier orients are doing.
If you make it through orientation/probation and out from under him, the issue changes from keeping him from flunking you, to not being his personal "kiddie kop".
If the company's culture supports his way of thinking and acting, consider going elsewhere.
 

usalsfyre

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Anyone describing their training as an "elite para-military" experience MUST be right :rolleyes:. I
mean after all, all I do is practice medicine, I'm not all tactical and stuff...

If your way is so much better, convince him. Show him why it works better your way. However, in this process of examination, look at WHY you do things the way you do. "Because I was taught that way" is not a good enough reason, if you can't explain it, be open to his suggestion. You may learn a thing or three yourself.
 

fast65

Doogie Howser FP-C
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Perhaps I wasn't explaining myself clearly. My training is reguarded as the best by outsiders, from within they make point to say they *strive* to be the best.
I did let emotion get the best of me, it was a mutual "screw you".
Furthermore, sitting down and having a calm, clear conversation with this particular medic seems out of the question. Primarily due to the public discussion he had with the rest of the base as well as the e-mail already sent & the body language and general attitude portrayed...

It may be regarded as "the best", however, that doesn't make it so. Most of the ER staff thinks I'm still in high school, but I obviously am not, things aren't always as they seem; the same concept applies to your training. Now I'm not saying that your training wasn't good, because I have no knowledge of it, but you can't say that one type of training is the best when people learn in so many different ways.

Is a "mutual 'screw you'" you really the type of attitude you guys want to bring to work? It's fine to be a little pissed at your partner, but one of you has to have the maturity to say "hey, let's talk about what happened." It doesn't matter if it "seems out of the question", what matters is that you at least tried to open up the barriers of communication. We have to communicate with patients every day, some are more difficult to talk to than others, there's no reason we shouldn't be able to do the same with someone we're going to spend 24 hours at a time with.
 
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BasicFirst

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^ I agree with your statements. I am somewhat reluctant to sit back, only due to this company providing 911 service, any call can turn into a disaster if you're not prepared properly.
I do know I am not under any supervision & my partner is in no way a preceptor or supervisor. The company is not big on having many supervisors.
 
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BasicFirst

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@fast65- Yes, very true. As I said my emotions (& likely his) won out here. Would anyne agree that SOME advanced training, not to mention years of experience is better than none? My way seems to be the only way-there is such a lack of any nailed down "way" here its impossible to know WHAT to do...
 

mycrofft

Still crazy but elsewhere
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Never fall back on "My training was the best"

Next thing, you'll have your dad's boxing on the lawn, and your dogs running races.
Even if in your mind they are a bunch of lunks, you will be able to learn something from them, and through that see better what they are about. It may still be "Uh, no thanks", but it might surprise you, especially if you look at patient outcomes.

If you DO bail, don't go to your next job interview talking trash about them, though.
 
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BasicFirst

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If your way is so much better, convince him. Show him why it works better your way. However, in this process of examination, look at WHY you do things the way you do. "Because I was taught that way" is not a good enough reason, if you can't explain it, be open to his suggestion. You may learn a thing or three yourself.

Not "because I said so" their training is what it is after years and years of watching pt's and EMTs get hurt and killed, they've developed a pretty good way of doing things & they are highly regarded.
 

fast65

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@fast65- Yes, very true. As I said my emotions (& likely his) won out here. Would anyne agree that SOME advanced training, not to mention years of experience is better than none? My way seems to be the only way-there is such a lack of any nailed down "way" here its impossible to know WHAT to do...

Well, I believe as paramedics, you both should have some form of advanced training...

What do you mean your "way"? What is this "way" you speak of? Protocols? Company operations? What is it?
 

usalsfyre

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Not "because I said so" their training is what it is after years and years of watching pt's and EMTs get hurt and killed, they've developed a pretty good way of doing things & they are highly regarded.

So can you articulate how those policies and procedures keep people from getting hurt? If not, why can't you?

10 years ago when I started it was commonly accepted not runing code to every call would result in needless deaths. Over time we've realized this isn't the case. Things change. What was relevant at the time may not be any more.
 
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BasicFirst

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@mycroft: I intend to stick it out, I am not a fan of quitting. I've never talked bad about a company....I never talk about a company....or war stories.

& never come to work unprepared or hungover or without an impecible uniform & shined boots & with professional "yes sir, no sir" dialogue with everyone....I dont call pt's "Buddy or pal". No I'm not the best, but I am good at what I do.
 

tssemt2010

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double paramedic truck, take turns writing the calls, one can sit back and relax and interject if they feel the need too, but if not then they can keep their mouth shut, thats what i have noticed works best
 
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BasicFirst

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@fast65: I am referring to a set of SOPs, there is no standard at this company & when I asked day 1 I was told..."It's whatever" by the ALS coordinator...
 

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