Common mistakes/misconceptions

Melclin

Forum Deputy Chief
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I'm want to fill a gap in the training schedule for my volly first aid group with something a bit interesting and fun, but that has value in clearing up everyday goofs that a lot of people have got into the habit of.

So I'm looking for contributions.

What mistakes, weird misconceptions and medical myths do you see propagated/practiced by new EMT/Medics and what myths relating to EMS are common in the general public that could really do with being cleared up?
 

LucidResq

Forum Deputy Chief
2,031
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1) Baywatch-style CPR brings people from being "dead" to standing and talking in minutes.

2) Helicopters are useful for almost every call.

3) Loud noises "make seizures worse" or keep propagating seizures. Although I understand some patients with seizure disorders are triggered by certain noises or loud noise, it's a small minority, and this is "common knowledge" up in my dispatch center that I'm furiously combating and meeting a lot of resistance with for some reason. It's very frustrating to hear people wasting precious seconds obsessing over how much noise their caller is making rather than providing important instructions such as "don't put anything in their mouth" and "move dangerous things away from them," and "don't hold them down."

4) I had an 18-20 yo patient in hypertensive crisis refuse AMA once thanks to his mother who swore up and down he just needed cottage cheese of all things. No, even though your BP is very suddenly well over 200/110... you need cottage cheese... not a doctor or hospital.
 
OP
Melclin

Melclin

Forum Deputy Chief
1,796
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1) Baywatch-style CPR brings people from being "dead" to standing and talking in minutes.

2) Helicopters are useful for almost every call.

3) Loud noises "make seizures worse" or keep propagating seizures. Although I understand some patients with seizure disorders are triggered by certain noises or loud noise, it's a small minority, and this is "common knowledge" up in my dispatch center that I'm furiously combating and meeting a lot of resistance with for some reason. It's very frustrating to hear people wasting precious seconds obsessing over how much noise their caller is making rather than providing important instructions such as "don't put anything in their mouth" and "move dangerous things away from them," and "don't hold them down."

4) I had an 18-20 yo patient in hypertensive crisis refuse AMA once thanks to his mother who swore up and down he just needed cottage cheese of all things. No, even though your BP is very suddenly well over 200/110... you need cottage cheese... not a doctor or hospital.
1)I have a big chunk on CPR, mostly about the whole ER style shouting and screaming and scrambling around on a code being both unrealistic and extremely undesirable.

2)We don't have any ability to call HEMS, but I do have a bit on speed in general not being a priority. It falls under the heading of "Running and pretending you're George Clooney" which covers calm and methodical practice, including (1).

3)That's an interesting one. I've never heard that. I'll cover it, cheers :)

4)Hahaha, wow. Jewish penicillin I could understand. I swear by the all-inclusive curative properties of chicken soup. But cottage cheese? That's going in the hilarious anecdotes section :)

You got anything else?
 

Bosco836

Forum Lieutenant
155
1
18
What mistakes, weird misconceptions and medical myths do you see propagated/practiced by new EMT/Medics and what myths relating to EMS are common in the general public that could really do with being cleared up?
Myth: You can let go of C-Spine once you've applied a C-Collar.
 

rwik123

Forum Asst. Chief
718
6
18
That a flat line with no electrical activity can be shocked... Basically every movie/tv show.
 

Bosco836

Forum Lieutenant
155
1
18
That a flat line with no electrical activity can be shocked... Basically every movie/tv show.
On that note, I would also like to add another myth/misconception that goes along with the above point: That one can "shock a heart back to life" - when in fact, if the heart is no longer beating (asystole/flatline), shocking it will do nothing.
 

Aidey

Forum Deputy Chiefette
4,800
11
38
High flow O2
Trendelenburg
Swallowing the tongue during a seizure
 

Aidey

Forum Deputy Chiefette
4,800
11
38
Yes, they do. I've also seen people not hold c-spine for 10 minutes, and then back board the patient. That is what happens when people are backboarding becuase protocol says so, not becuase the patient actually needs it.
 
OP
Melclin

Melclin

Forum Deputy Chief
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Good suggestions.

Myth: You can let go of C-Spine once you've applied a C-Collar.
Are you guys suggesting that spinally immobilized patients should be held the whole time you're with them?

If nothing else it seems impractical. Also, surely you'd be more likely to move a pts head accidentally than you would if you just left them in a collar and told them not to move.
 

jjesusfreak01

Forum Deputy Chief
1,344
2
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Good suggestions.



Are you guys suggesting that spinally immobilized patients should be held the whole time you're with them?

If nothing else it seems impractical. Also, surely you'd be more likely to move a pts head accidentally than you would if you just left them in a collar and told them not to move.
This is what firefighters were created for. If you have a real trauma case you're gonna be off scene in a few minutes anyways (ideally), so let a certified first responder hold c-spine while you fully restrain the patient, if you're into that kinda thing.
 

Veneficus

Forum Chief
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Good suggestions.



Are you guys suggesting that spinally immobilized patients should be held the whole time you're with them?

If nothing else it seems impractical. Also, surely you'd be more likely to move a pts head accidentally than you would if you just left them in a collar and told them not to move.
I am still waiting to see who is holding c-spine in the hospital on patients all night long.
 

Minnick27

Forum Crew Member
35
0
0
The CID blocks will be holding c spine. If no blocks or towels or anything you should have someone hold it
 

reaper

Working Bum
2,817
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Really? The ED will remove pt from the board, as soon as we get there. I just can't remember seeing that invisible person holding c-spine all night.
 

Pseudonymous

Forum Crew Member
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0
0
This is what firefighters were created for. If you have a real trauma case you're gonna be off scene in a few minutes anyways (ideally), so let a certified first responder hold c-spine while you fully restrain the patient, if you're into that kinda thing.
We can have a bystander hold C-spine, but the collar has to be on, and they can't hold while we roll.
 

TheyCallMeNasty

Forum Crew Member
56
0
0
you hold c spine until the head bed with straps holds c-spine and they do not remove them until the spine is cleared by a doctor in the ER.
 

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