What exactly is diabetes type 2?

FlamingFirefox

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I’ve seen many different texts and books describe diabetes type 2 differently. Some texts would say it’s the pancreas not producing enough insulin, or insulin that doesn’t function the way it’s supposed to the other one I hear is “insulin resistance” when the body builds a resistance to insulin due to a lot of glucose/sugar in the body thus a lot of insulin produced then the body builds a resistance to it. So are both diabetes? Thanks in advance.
 

silver

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From the American Diabetes Association position statement on classification:
  1. Type 1 diabetes (due to autoimmune β-cell destruction, usually leading to absolute insulin deficiency)
  2. Type 2 diabetes (due to a progressive loss of adequate β-cell insulin secretion frequently on the background of insulin resistance)
 

Carlos Danger

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I’ve seen many different texts and books describe diabetes type 2 differently. Some texts would say it’s the pancreas not producing enough insulin, or insulin that doesn’t function the way it’s supposed to the other one I hear is “insulin resistance” when the body builds a resistance to insulin due to a lot of glucose/sugar in the body thus a lot of insulin produced then the body builds a resistance to it. So are both diabetes? Thanks in advance.
Most receptors in your body will become desensitized to the chemicals that are meant to activate them if they are exposed to those chemicals too frequently. Insulin receptors are no different: when insulin levels are chronically high for a long period of time, your insulin receptors start to not work as well. You need higher levels of insulin in order to get the insulin receptors to do their job. This results in two problems: your blood glucose levels become chronically elevated because the insulin receptors aren't working well, and your pancreas have to work harder to make more insulin. This wreaks havoc on your body in all kinds of ways, causes hormonal imbalances, and can eventually wear your pancreas out to the point that you need to take shots of insulin. It is a complex process that typically evolves over years and manifests in adulthood, though childhood cases are sadly becoming more common.

Type I diabetes is where the pancreas doesn't secrete insulin at all (or very little), so you have to take shots of insulin or use an insulin pump. This is an autoimmune process that typically manifests in childhood.
 

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