New EMT-B first job

Basic 22

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Hey everyone, first post coming your way.

I passed my NREMT a little over a year ago and am at a point where i am interviewing for my first EMT-B job with AMR. I'm 28 years old and also in college pursuing a degree in radiologic technology so i have passed A&P 1 and 2 with high grades. I'm looking for any and all tips/advice on the first basic job. I feel like i will forget everything I'm supposed to know right when im supposed to know it. I know experience is the best teacher but i just don't want to get out there and freeze up or let my partner and or patient down when the time comes.
Thanks in advance.
 

Chimpie

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I'm confused (doesn't take much). Are you looking for tips on finding the first job or looking for tips on how to refresh your skills?

If it's the latter, you could go back to your school and audit some of the class sessions, or help monitor the students with their skills. Joining a volunteer fire department is another option.
 
OP
Basic 22

Basic 22

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Any advice for my first EMT job. I have an interview set for Tuesday. I have no experience on the truck other than my clinical 3rd rides.
 

Chimpie

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Any advice for my first EMT job. I have an interview set for Tuesday.
Well, if you're looking for your first EMT job, and you have an interview on Tuesday, then I think you're good.
 
OP
Basic 22

Basic 22

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No lol. I mean advice for a beginner EMT. Like helpful information to make things go smoother, stuff to not do, etc...
 

mgr22

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1. Be on time and in good humor.
2. Do lots of listening and little talking. Let your actions speak for you.
3. Learn some of the things your coworkers hate to do, then offer to do them.
4. Don't say anything bad about anyone.
5. Don't carry more stuff on your belt than your partners do.
6. Don't take yourself too seriously.
 

Gustavo

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Go ahead and read "fresh out of emt school" by Albert Reyes it shows you tips and tricks for the new emt. That book will answer your questions.
 

PsychEMS499

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.....Don't shake on a trauma call......
Besides that just be confident in your patient care, accept criticism, correct/review skills as needed, and don't get offended when someone yells at you during a call because you're messing up. It takes a minute to get into the groove of things, so don't get let yourself get overwhelmed thinking your unqualified or any of that crap. Make sure you relax after your shift and give the job a while to set in, I remember my first shift as an EMT-B, I went on a trauma that involved a motorcycle crash and I felt so unqualified to be handling this persons life in my hands but I just did what I was told and discussed afterwards what I could have done better and now I feel extremely confident and competent in my patient care and now I can lead trauma calls (not as a basic, I'm an advanced now).
 
OP
Basic 22

Basic 22

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.....Don't shake on a trauma call......
Besides that just be confident in your patient care, accept criticism, correct/review skills as needed, and don't get offended when someone yells at you during a call because you're messing up. It takes a minute to get into the groove of things, so don't get let yourself get overwhelmed thinking your unqualified or any of that crap. Make sure you relax after your shift and give the job a while to set in, I remember my first shift as an EMT-B, I went on a trauma that involved a motorcycle crash and I felt so unqualified to be handling this persons life in my hands but I just did what I was told and discussed afterwards what I could have done better and now I feel extremely confident and competent in my patient care and now I can lead trauma calls (not as a basic, I'm an advanced now).
The main thing I'm a little nervous about is messing up on a pt assessment (especially a medical assessment). I'm more comfortable with trauma assessment but mainly, i just don't want to get out there and do something wrong. I take this seriously because i want to be a good EMT and i want to be the best asset to my partner and patient that i can be.
 

Chimpie

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i just don't want to get out there and do something wrong
Everyone in every industry in every job messes up.

You're going to do something wrong. You're going to mess up. You're going to fumble around, bump into things, bump into your partner, bump into your patient. You're going to trip on the bags on the ground. You're going to step over the patient even though you were told not to in class. You're going to make faces when you experience new things. You're going to mess up on vitals.

The thing to remember is: Make the mistake once, correct it, and don't do it again. Learn from them. Grow everyday.
 

Beisen907

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I was in your shoes a few months ago with AMR. Now I'm doing IFT full-time and really enjoying it. Here are some things I picked up:
1. Never use being new as an excuse. Accept your mistake, learn from it, then move on to the next call.
2. If you are unsure of anything, always ask. Never assume anything.
3. Use a GPS for everything. Even if you are sure of where you're going, taking 30 seconds to set the GPS up is a lot quicker than having to backtrack if you make a wrong turn.
4. Know how to chart and write an effective narrative. Ask your partner to look on as they're filling out their PCR and have them walk you through how they're doing it. MEDS has a lot of small fields that you need to hit every time.
5. Know your place as an EMT and realize that you are now apart of the healthcare team. There have already been a few times I've noticed/found something pertinent that my medic, the nurses, or the doctor missed. If you see something, make sure to say something.
6. Dude, have fun. Talk with everyone you meet (when appropriate), greet everyone with a smile and a firm handshake, and make confident, positive choices.
 

SAREMT

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5. Don't carry more stuff on your belt than your partners do.
This ^ nobody likes medical batman.

You will have an FTO who will specifically spend the next 15 or so shifts with you attempting to make you street ready. Learn as much as you can from them. Keep up a good work ethic and positive attitude. Unfortunately this field has a lot of negative attitudes, and it's very contagious. Do your pretrip inspections every shift. I almost always find something that needs restocked.

No one expects you to come out of field training as a flawless EMT, let alone your first day. Just strive to do your best always and learn from your mistakes. There is a lot to be learned and a lot of experience to attain. Good luck.

So, did you get the job?
 

jgmedic

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I was in your shoes a few months ago with AMR. Now I'm doing IFT full-time and really enjoying it. Here are some things I picked up:
1. Never use being new as an excuse. Accept your mistake, learn from it, then move on to the next call.
2. If you are unsure of anything, always ask. Never assume anything.
3. Use a GPS for everything. Even if you are sure of where you're going, taking 30 seconds to set the GPS up is a lot quicker than having to backtrack if you make a wrong turn.
4. Know how to chart and write an effective narrative. Ask your partner to look on as they're filling out their PCR and have them walk you through how they're doing it. MEDS has a lot of small fields that you need to hit every time.
5. Know your place as an EMT and realize that you are now apart of the healthcare team. There have already been a few times I've noticed/found something pertinent that my medic, the nurses, or the doctor missed. If you see something, make sure to say something.
6. Dude, have fun. Talk with everyone you meet (when appropriate), greet everyone with a smile and a firm handshake, and make confident, positive choices.
Dear God, do not use a GPS for everything. Learn your area, and how to read a map. GPS is great until it takes you the wrong way or to a different street.
 

CloudofBlack90

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Learn anything and everything you can within your ability from your senior. I was in your shoes a year ago and my senior taught me everything I needed to know and how to operate it for whenever I got in the box with a medic for a **** call. Helped out tremendously. Also never completely rely on your GPS. They can screw up just as quick as anything. Learn the area you'll be in and never be afraid to speak up if you think your getting lost. YOU WILL make mistakes, but you are human like everyone else. Take the hit, dont dwell on it, and I promise its not a personal stab. Stay confident and rock the streets.
 

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