Gun on scene ? / n00b student question

RescueYou

Forum Lieutenant
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True that

That is a nice thought, and should be enforced but in the real world things happen daily and one needs to know how to handle when they are confronted with the norm. As described one should have knowledge of how to safely handle weapons and disarm them to be handled and secured properly.

R/r 911

Ok. Fair enough. Being as I'm from my current city (about 26,000 people) and have no intentions of ever leaving, I never really have to consider the "what ifs" like this. I mean, we're 10mins away from a city of 91,000, but in comparison to some, that's tiny. Being as I'm a 2nd degree black belt and from a relatively small city, the big "gun" factor doesn't really come up for me. BUT, I do agree that in higher risk areas, EMS need to be trained in the martial arts or gun control or something at least a little.

BTW, here, it IS reality for us to immediately leave an unsafe scene or not enter to start. It is enforced daily here. Although, I'll admit. I have been on a scene where I started to get a strongggg sense of fear. Maybe it was the fact that all the police were wearing bullet proof vests and I wasn't or maybe because the one I was told to follow into the building was cocking his shotgun while telling me to "stay close and be prepared to get down." You tell me ^_^ LOL
 

JeffDHMC

Forum Lieutenant
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Dude, shooters don't leave their heat on scene, it goes in the drink or the land-locked equivalent. Only guns I have ever found were being carried or in the hand of a guy with his smarts on the wall.

Realistically, it's a question that I have never considered.

Jeff
 

trevor1189

Forum Captain
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Violent crimes, psychiatric patients, threatening suicide = STAGING AWAY FROM THE SCENE.

Remember scene safety! I don't care if we know there is a person who has been shot and bleeding out. PD needs to tell me it's ok to come into the scene.

As for finding a weapon on a pt. or at a scene during an assessment, I do enjoy shooting and know how to operate guns, so I would most likely unload and secure the weapon (assuming it hasn't been used in a crime). If I happened to find it in the back of the ambulance enroute, I would just have our dispatcher notify the hospital security to meet us outside and secure the weapon.
 

mycrofft

Still crazy but elsewhere
11,322
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OK let's make it understood that everyone is fricking Wyatt Earp.

You all know everything there is to about guns...or firearms. Of course it's the experts who cap themselves once in a while.

Very unlikely scenario, unless say the vic was lying on top of it, then you call the cops over.

We were taught to clear weapons from casualties before they were taken into the 2E medical site in the Guard, but as for clearing a strange weapon that someone may have tampered with...Nice way to accidentally discharge.

Oh, yeah. LE rolls up and you are standing there with a gun you just picked up in your hand....hmmmm.
 

firecoins

IFT Puppet
3,880
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You don't enter a crime scene without LE giving you the go-ahead first. .

After the police make the scene safe, you should be saving life first. The term "crime scene" would indicate an investigation is ongoing. You should be out there way before that. Preserving evidence is secondary to saving life.
 

firecoins

IFT Puppet
3,880
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Being as I'm a 2nd degree black belt and from a relatively small city, the big "gun" factor doesn't really come up for me. BUT, I do agree that in higher risk areas, EMS need to be trained in the martial arts or gun control or something at least a little.
The bullet entering your body does not care if you have a 2nd degree black belt if whatever martial art. Don't let martial arts training make you believe you are invinsible.
 

fiddlesticks

Forum Crew Member
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um why would you take pics with your phone? thats not your job your there to treat any pts. leave that to the cops and dont touch anything you dont need to.
 

rsdemt

Forum Crew Member
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dealing with a gun

I have worked in Md and Va.
In both states protocol is to "stage" for any crime scenario.
If we were to break this protocol, I am sure there would be major penalties. Every 9-1-1 center I have seen in Md and Va, are police/fire/ems combined.
They have direct communications back and forth.
One night we went to the scene of an attempted suicide. Police gave OK to respons to the scene. As me and my crew walked in there was a butcher knife right next to the patient. With the police officer standing right next to it. The officer of our unit asked the officer to get the knife. The officer never noticed the knife on the bed.
When our crew got back to the station we advised the rescue chief what had happened. He called the police department, but never heard the outcome.
 
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