Fatigued lifting, safe?

ItsTheBLS

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I started working out about 2 months ago. Just this past week I got hired as an EMT at a non-emergency transport service.

I weight about 135lbs and have not had any major issues lifting 250lb+ patients on any given day. However, I am afraid that if I work out on day #1, then I will be too sore on day #2 and be unable to lift patients or have an increased risk of dropping them.

How can I balance weight training at the gym with my per-diem EMT job? Is it possible? Am I wrong for thinking that I will be too fatigued the next day to lift patients?
 

Anonymous

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It was never an issue for myself. No matter how sore I was or hard I worked out the previous day, or even before my shift, I could muster enough for to lift a person from point A to point B. I am however a fairly big person.

My advice is use your judgement. If you feel unsafe doing something then don't. Ask for help, ask for a lift assist etc.

You have only been lifting for two months so it should get better as time goes on.
 

leetdragoon

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the body adapts, first of all your problem is that you're 135lbs, time to bulk brah
 

Carlos Danger

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I started working out about 2 months ago. Just this past week I got hired as an EMT at a non-emergency transport service.

I weight about 135lbs and have not had any major issues lifting 250lb+ patients on any given day. However, I am afraid that if I work out on day #1, then I will be too sore on day #2 and be unable to lift patients or have an increased risk of dropping them.

How can I balance weight training at the gym with my per-diem EMT job? Is it possible? Am I wrong for thinking that I will be too fatigued the next day to lift patients?

First thing: if you are consistently using proper body mechanics when you lift, your chances of getting injured are fairly small. ALWAYS USE PROPER BODY MECHANICS, and if a patient is just too damn big to lift safely, or is in a position where you won't be able to use proper body mechanics when lifting, get lots of help and plan the transfer carefully. Don't ever let anyone rush you to the point that you are having to do things unsafely in order to get them done "quick enough"....make that a permanent commitment to yourself and your patients now, early in your career. It's worth losing a job over, even if it were to come to that (which I highly, highly doubt it ever will).

Second thing: if you are doing squats and deadlifts regularly, and doing them properly, you have probably decreased your chances of injuring yourself by another 50% at least. Just make sure you are doing them correctly, and remember that no matter how strong you get, you still have to use good body mechanics when lifting patients.

Lastly, to your question: unless you are really killing it in the gym, like to the point that you literally collapse after your last set and can barely walk when you leave, then I doubt you'll be unsafe to lift patients the next day. You probably won't want to lift patients the day after you squat and deadlift, but I doubt you'll be unsafe. Just make sure you stay well hydrated and get a good nights sleep.

If you have to lift heavy the day before working because that's just how your schedule falls and you want to stick to it, ibuprofen before bed will probably help a lot. You don't want to take it every day that you lift, just on those days that you know you are going to be really sore tomorrow but you have to work. Not giving medical advice, of course, just a suggestion on something to discuss with your physician.
 

MSDeltaFlt

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I started working out about 2 months ago. Just this past week I got hired as an EMT at a non-emergency transport service.

I weight about 135lbs and have not had any major issues lifting 250lb+ patients on any given day. However, I am afraid that if I work out on day #1, then I will be too sore on day #2 and be unable to lift patients or have an increased risk of dropping them.

How can I balance weight training at the gym with my per-diem EMT job? Is it possible? Am I wrong for thinking that I will be too fatigued the next day to lift patients?

I have worked out to failure on leg day with my shift starting the next day being almost too sore to sit on a toilet and i still could lift patients weighing over 250lbs. And I was over 40. You'll move slowly and it'll hurt but you'll still be able to do it.
 

joemt

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I will just echo what the rest have said. I used to work out regularly (need to get back to that).. did a LOT of work on my legs and NEVER had an incident that I wasn't able to lift the patient or thought I might not be able to lift the patient.

Train hard, train safe, give good patient care....every time.

Just my .02
 
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