book recommendations

CbrMonster

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as title states, looking for a book recommendation for those looking to go flight medic

thanks in advance!
 

VentMonkey

Family Guy
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Test prep? Autobiographical? Biographical? Fictional? Science-Fictional?
 
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CbrMonster

Forum Lieutenant
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Test prep? Autobiographical? Biographical? Fictional? Science-Fictional?
fair response lol, i should have been more specific.

i guess what i'm looking for is a book improving my knowledge base for wanting to become a flight medic, currently a box medic, work in a very rural setting with routinely 1+ long transports. test prep would also help as well. should i look more into cct books?
 

VentMonkey

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Honestly, that’s a pretty loaded question. Tons of books and test preps have been beaten to death on this sub-forum already.

In today’s over-saturated critical care prep world you literally have endless materials cut, copy, and pasted to said company’s teaching methods.

Personally speaking I don’t recommend any one specific tes prep platform as I’ve done several and each had their pros and cons.

The one course, or course type I do recommend—if it’s financially feasible—would be a semesters-long one like Creighton or U of F. Neither are cheap, but they are about as in depth as one could ask for.

Or, you could just start with basic FOAM-ED podcasts and work your way out from there. There’s literally tons of material, free, affordable, moderately priced, or expensive.
 
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CbrMonster

Forum Lieutenant
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Honestly, that’s a pretty loaded question. Tons of books and test preps have been beaten to death on this sub-forum already.

In today’s over-saturated critical care prep world you literally have endless materials cut, copy, and pasted to said company’s teaching methods.

Personally speaking I don’t recommend any one specific tes prep platform as I’ve done several and each had their pros and cons.

The one course, or course type I do recommend—if it’s financially feasible—would be a semesters-long one like Creighton or U of F. Neither are cheap, but they are about as in depth as one could ask for.

Or, you could just start with basic FOAM-ED podcasts and work your way out from there. There’s literally tons of material, free, affordable, moderately priced, or expensive.
kinda figured, but was hoping their might be a commonly recommended book.

i tried searching first and wasn't getting anything which is why i ask,

this foam ed podcast you speak of is it on apples podcast app?
 

VentMonkey

Family Guy
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this foam ed podcast you speak of is it on apples podcast app?
There’s a ton on Apple, yes. FOAM-ed just mean Free Open Access Medical EDucation.

I’m not really feeling endorsey ATM, as I think many offer value.

I will say some are overly progressive and thrive on challenging the status quo. Others are less aggressive in their thought process.

YouTube is also quite valuable, and free.

You’re entering a field that is so saturated with test prep options, tips on how to get hired, etc. You’ll def have a leg up on preparation.

It’s nothing like when I first started, let alone the dino’s who took the exams on stone tablets before there was much study material.
 

VentMonkey

Family Guy
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Also, if you’re currently a “rural paramedic” in a lower call volume area you might want to consider picking up shifts in a busier area.

Most progams want the 3 years in a “dynamic/ high performance”, i.e., busy *** metro system area.

The “basic/ box” paramedic aspects of the job are often expected to take a back seat to other areas that will need to be learned by you (e.g., critical care knowledge—which is often learned as you go), or refined (e.g., your cognitive priorities, and task orientation).

Being a coverage supervisor for our rural areas helped me with a lot of the above mentioned.

The books often help you learn the fundamental knowledge you’ll learn one way or another. They, along with podcasts and test prep prepare you for the exams…and some aspects of the job.

A full semester worth of critical care programs provide the time to process info that will be all new to you, puts you in cohorts, and will challenge your clinical and ambitious prowess.

Take it for what it’s worth, this has jus been mostly my experience. YMMDV.
 

Aprz

Non flying critical care flight attendant
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I took both IA Med and FlightBridgeED online. If you get hired with one of the large air ambulance companies, you'll be required to complete FlightBridgeED whether you have an advance cert or not. I heard The ResQ Shop sounds good, but I haven't tried it. These are online video classes mostly death by power point. In my opinion, IA Med is less dry than FlightBridgeED. Both IA Med and FlightBridgeED were weak on hemodynamics. IA Med arterial blood gas section is easier to follow. FlightBridgeED is slightly more comprehensive with labs/electrolytes.

The ResQShop is by William Wingfield, author of ACE SAT. ACE SAT is just a test practice book. I felt FP-C was most similar to the ACE SAT practice questions.

Back to Basics is another commonly recommended book. Some of its CAMTS questions are outdated.

Kyle Faudree from IA Med put together Flight Paramedic Certification: A Comprehensive Study Guide. If you pay for IA Med, this is essentially the IA Med resources printed on paper. I don't feel it was that comprehensive, but was simple, easy to follow, and easy to reference. It's kind of the Dubin Dale book for flight paramedics, like almost like a children's picture book.

FlightBridgeED has several books: one for the FP-C, two on ventilators, and one practice test book for C-NPT.




They were okay. The Prehospital Ventilator ventilator strategy is similar is similar to a large air ambulance company's vent strategy. I felt like the Ventilator Management Advance Concept books was kind of sloppily put together. Just like their online class, sometimes hard to follow and lacks pictures.

If you're not sick of ventilators, The Ventilator Book is another vent book. The beginning of the book lists a couple of ventilator strategies based on patient's condition then goes over why the author use those ventilator strategies.

If you have a Facebook, FOAMfrat is kinda nice to follow for like short daily topics.
 
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CbrMonster

Forum Lieutenant
167
57
28
I took both IA Med and FlightBridgeED online. If you get hired with one of the large air ambulance companies, you'll be required to complete FlightBridgeED whether you have an advance cert or not. I heard The ResQ Shop sounds good, but I haven't tried it. These are online video classes mostly death by power point. In my opinion, IA Med is less dry than FlightBridgeED. Both IA Med and FlightBridgeED were weak on hemodynamics. IA Med arterial blood gas section is easier to follow. FlightBridgeED is slightly more comprehensive with labs/electrolytes.

The ResQShop is by William Wingfield, author of ACE SAT. ACE SAT is just a test practice book. I felt FP-C was most similar to the ACE SAT practice questions.

Back to Basics is another commonly recommended book. Some of its CAMTS questions are outdated.

Kyle Faudree from IA Med put together Flight Paramedic Certification: A Comprehensive Study Guide. If you pay for IA Med, this is essentially the IA Med resources printed on paper. I don't feel it was that comprehensive, but was simple, easy to follow, and easy to reference. It's kind of the Dubin Dale book for flight paramedics, like almost like a children's picture book.

FlightBridgeED has several books: one for the FP-C, two on ventilators, and one practice test book for C-NPT.




They were okay. The Prehospital Ventilator ventilator strategy is similar is similar to a large air ambulance company's vent strategy. I felt like the Ventilator Management Advance Concept books was kind of sloppily put together. Just like their online class, sometimes hard to follow and lacks pictures.

If you're not sick of ventilators, The Ventilator Book is another vent book. The beginning of the book lists a couple of ventilator strategies based on patient's condition then goes over why the author use those ventilator strategies.

If you have a Facebook, FOAMfrat is kinda nice to follow for like short daily topics.
awesome i will look into your recommendations
 
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