Australia recruiting international paramedics

McGoo

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mycrofft

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I didn't mean to imply the limited list was private .

I posted Queensland's site purposely because it is NOT a private recruiter.

When I googled it, the top five returns were private recruiters, not counting the two paid ads above the search criteria confirmation line.

Headhunters only care about bringing the bodies over, they don't care if you get back, or if you can really get the job or not.
 

McGoo

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I posted Queensland's site purposely because it is NOT a private recruiter.

When I googled it, the top five returns were private recruiters, not counting the two paid ads above the search criteria confirmation line.

Headhunters only care about bringing the bodies over, they don't care if you get back, or if you can really get the job or not.
Ah, roger that. My misunderstanding. We do have private companies, but I have no idea how they recruit or who through, we do all ours in house.
 

nswAU

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Ah, roger that. My misunderstanding. We do have private companies, but I have no idea how they recruit or who through, we do all ours in house.
Well it is like NSW and most of Aus, private companies do mainly event coverage (if St John volunteers don't cover it) and very few IFT. only the statutory ambulance service (ie ASNSW (govt) here or St John in WA) can respond to 000 calls.
 

mycrofft

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Employers would contract with US companies to recruit.

Recruiters can be good or they can be like used car salesmen.
 

para344

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Private companies in Victoria handle non-emerg transports (inter-hospitals etc...) as well as event coverage. There are also private companies that sub-contract industrial paramedics, mine rescue, etc...
 

para344

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If you are considering applying to work in Australia with one of the emergency ambulance services (all state run btw), it is better to write directly to them. Most services will happily let you know when their next intake is and some will consider applications from international paramedics at any time. The ambulance services are;

Victoria (VIC): Ambulance Victoria
New South Wales (NSW): Ambulance Service of NSW
Queensland (QLD): Queensland Ambulance Service
Tasmania: Ambulance Tasmania
South Australia (SA): South Australian Ambulance Service
Australian Capital Territory (ACT): ACT Ambulance Service
West Australia (WA): St John Ambulance Australia (WA)
Northern territory (NT): St John Ambulance Australia (NT)

The last two (St John) are a charitable organisation that contracts to the government to provide ambulance services.
ACT Ambulance only employs ICP's.

Your other option is to apply to one of the mining companies... They pay reasonably well, but are dependent on the minerals boom...

Hope this helps.
 

mycrofft

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Good on you, Para

;).....
 

hails*

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from alberta to australia

does anyone know the qualifications needed and what is transferable? Im an EMT-A in alberta and CMA acredidted which is reconized across Canada but i dont know much for internationally...

any ideas??
 

Scott33

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If you read the 2 links in the first post, you will get an idea of what is transferrable, and what may have to be based on individual merit.
 

para344

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The current base education for a paramedic is a degree; 3 years of uni specialising in pre-hospital care, usually followed by 1 year of employment as a paramedic to be recognised as "qualified" (similar to what nurses have to do here). Untgil there is national registration, each state will continue to have slightly different requirements :huh: ... That's for ALS level. And, as has been much discussed here, there are differences in scope of practice between the different EMS providers here and internationally.

To qualify as an ICP paramedic, you usually need to have been practicing at an ALS level for 2 years post-qualification and then undertake an internal ICP course. While the course is internal, it includes a graduate diploma from a recognised university. Victoria has had a graduate diploma requirement for many years, so I suspect you would need to have at least that level of education to be considered for ICP here.

:excl: If you want to fully understand our scope of practice you should look at these guidelines . This is what Victorian paramedics (ALS & ICP/MICA) use. Note that they are guidelines only and we can operate outside them if justified . What this means is that I could, as an ALS paramedic, perform an ICP level procedure if a) I was trained b)the patient clearly needed it c) it was clinically, ethically, and legally justifiable d) I have consulted with a higher medical authority if available (ie; one of our senior ICP's in the control room, a doctor at the receiving hospital, or another reasonable source) e) it is reasonable to do so. The last point underpins much of Australian law in this regard - ie; what would a reasonable person with the same level of education, training and experience do in the same situation.

That said, not many paramedics of any level will operate outside our guidelines without consultation. a) because it is generally easy to consult b) because the guidelines are pretty comprehensive and being added to every year (using evidence based research) and c) because you will cop a clinical review and need to attend a please explain meeting which is painful. However, consultation is an everyday occurrence here and is used to form part of the evidence base for instituting change (yes, it is encouraged).

I hope that helps to answer some scope questions for you.

Now, regarding portability and recognition. There are two ways you could do this;

1. Apply to a specific ambulance service in Australia. Contact them and request info regarding their specific educational and experience requirements. Then, compare your education to their requirements (see RPL below) and note all matches and mis-matches (you will need to explain why the mis-matches are irrelevant - if they are). Now, get a copy of their Clinical Practice Guidelines (all Australian services have them, and they are named as such) and compare what you currently do with theirs; CPG by CPG, again noting any differences. If you come up as meeting all the requirements, then you can write to them and explain why you would be a great asset to their service and ask for an interview. Of course, they may just want to see you in person. No one ever said this was easy! Oh, and you will also need a work visa before you can apply. See the Department of Immigration for further info. I don't know of any service that will sponsor you.

2. RPL (Recognition of Prior Learning). Australia uses a national framework of educational qualification that enables you to have qualifications from one university recognised by another. The beauty of this is that you can have international qualifications recognised as well. To do this you will need to find a university that is willing (read helpful and proactive) to go through the process with you. Once that is done, you wil need to compare your current qualification with theirs. To do this, you need the course, unit and subject outlines from both universities and compare them. Once again, you need to note the matches and mis-matches. Any mis-matches can be dealt with by enrolling with that university and completing their degree by distance education (but only the units you require - the mis-matches essentially). You then end up with an Australian degree which will be recognised by any service here.

Option 1 is good if you have the education, skills and experience to match the service in the state you want to live in (more research there!). Option 2 is good if you aren't sure or if you don't meet Australian education requirements.

Option 1 is painfully long and tedious (which probably explains the lack of international paramedics, but there are some here). Option 2 can be expensive (you need to check out the university fee structure for international students)

Clear as mud? I thought so! It is a difficult process, but it is possible. First you need to make the decision about whether or not you want to live and work in Australia. You should also check out the cost of living and pay rates. Also, be prepared to do a lot of leg-work in getting all your paperwork and cross-referencing done.

Good luck! Let me know if you want any other info.

P

PS: There is an ex-AV paramedic working in/around Whitehorse...
 

Medic419

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Paramedic's in an ER

Good Morning,
I was curious if AU Medics work in Emergency Rooms as they do here in the US? My wife and I are thinking about relocating to AU next year.
 

nswAU

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Not that I know of. Our emergency departments here are near exclusive located in "public hospitals" and are staffed by RN's, EN's, Nurse practitioners and Doctors. Also keep in mind the paramedics here are paid significantly better and there is no "massive chunk" of health deductibles taken out (only the 1.5% medicare premium which covers all treatments by your family doctor, public hospital etc and you can opt for "private health funds" which cover dental etc for about $80 a week for a family)
 

ambulance

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Dear members, Could anyone suggest a Paramedic degree pathway for an overseas qualified paramedic. I have obtained an Advanced Diploma in paramedic science from Australia through RPL. I am looking for a cost-effective university-based pathway from an Advanced Diploma to a Bachelor's degree by online mode. I would appreciate the member's suggestions. Thank you in advance.
 

RedBlanketRunner

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I'd like to see side by side qualification criteria and training standards between Europe, the U.S. and Aus. Would be interesting.
I remember a few years back Aus not accepting physicians from the U.S.. Standards didn't meet criteria. Never heard how that has been addressed if it has.
If you want a Land Rover, head to the Northern Territory. Good running ones, dirt cheap. The down side is you can't drive them. Any problem or defect gets you a nasty ticket and they may even abate the vehicle. A crack in any window, seat off it's track, any rust, oil on the engine etc. When I went to buy one there, had a really good running one for only $500 I was sternly warned to get a rego pre-inspection. My dream LR went up in smoke when I discovered it would take way over $7500 to bring it up to legal.

NT cops give a whole new meaning to hard nosed. 03:00 not another car in sight. I pulled up to a red light, stopped and made the turn. Instant pull over from nowhere. 20 minutes explaining it was legal in the US. They took the info off my passport telling me they would keep it on file. One more maneuver like that and they would throw the book at me.
 
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CCCSD

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I'd like to see side by side qualification criteria and training standards between Europe, the U.S. and Aus. Would be interesting.
I remember a few years back Aus not accepting physicians from the U.S.. Standards didn't meet criteria. Never heard how that has been addressed if it has.
If you want a Land Rover, head to the Northern Territory. Good running ones, dirt cheap. The down side is you can't drive them. Any problem or defect gets you a nasty ticket and they may even abate the vehicle. A crack in any window, seat off it's track, any rust, oil on the engine etc. When I went to buy one there, had a really good running one for only $500 I was sternly warned to get a rego pre-inspection. My dream LR went up in smoke when I disccovered it would take way over $7500 to bring it up to legal.
What, if anything, does your rambling reply have to do with this topic?
 

RedBlanketRunner

Opheophagus Hannah Cuddler
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What, if anything, does your rambling reply have to do with this topic?
"I'd like to see side by side qualification criteria and training standards between Europe, the U.S. and Aus."

Thinking of pie in the sky, darling. Universal standards of pre-hospital patient care. Then I touched on a subject another posting brought up and I mentioned certain standards that an emergency response agency upheld to give an example of how on top of things they were in NT. Now if you look carefully on your screen you will see the little click thing 'Report'. Click it and a text box will open. You can cut and paste the following works in it: "Off Topic".
 
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