when is it necessary to...

medichopeful

Flight nurse, ground paramedic
1,811
202
63
This is coming from someone out of the profession, so it may be different from what others say.

I would say when they put yourself or others in danger, they are breaking the law, or they are acting in an unprofessional manner. I would talk to them first, then raise it to the next level.
 

Seaglass

Lesser Ambulance Ape
973
0
0
When it crosses the line. And as the newbie on the squad, when it's very clear-cut and I'm the only one who can do anything.

I've only run into one situation so far. One paramedic hates the new type of gloves we switched to. I don't think it's accidental that he's always forgetting, even when reminded. So, I've learned to grab an extra pair and make a show of giving them to him in front of the patient. Works every time.

I'd report him, but I'm worried I'd lose the job. He's related to the jerk I'd report to, and they're very close. He's been at the company forever with a good reputation, while I'm brand new. And so on...
 

Mountain Res-Q

Forum Deputy Chief
1,757
0
0
When you notice it has the potential to cross the line.
Plus 1

Once it has crossed the line (whatever line that may be)... it is too late but to be someone who did't act quick enough...

Case in point... I know of two SO Jail Deputies that got canned recently... One of them was commiting every sin in the book... charging off-duty meals (his and friends) on the SO Charge Card (including alcohol), getting bored on prisioner transports and pulling vehicles over at random... just to speed by them laughing his butt off, etc...

His newbie partner is a good person that didn't want to rock the boat... so went along with it... then they got caught. They were both canned (with good reason), even though she was a good person that got caught up in someone elses screw-ups. We have mutual friends, and she is really mad at herself for not coming forward earlier and saving her job and reputation...

Sometimes "When it crosses a line" is too late... the sooner appropriate action is take (appropriate being the key word)... the better!
 

medic417

The Truth Provider
5,104
3
38
When it crosses the line. And as the newbie on the squad, when it's very clear-cut and I'm the only one who can do anything.

I've only run into one situation so far. One paramedic hates the new type of gloves we switched to. I don't think it's accidental that he's always forgetting, even when reminded. So, I've learned to grab an extra pair and make a show of giving them to him in front of the patient. Works every time.

I'd report him, but I'm worried I'd lose the job. He's related to the jerk I'd report to, and they're very close. He's been at the company forever with a good reputation, while I'm brand new. And so on...
Gloves are not needed with every patient. I think you are making a big noise over a minor personal choice.
 

daedalus

Forum Deputy Chief
1,784
1
0
When it crosses the line. And as the newbie on the squad, when it's very clear-cut and I'm the only one who can do anything.

I've only run into one situation so far. One paramedic hates the new type of gloves we switched to. I don't think it's accidental that he's always forgetting, even when reminded. So, I've learned to grab an extra pair and make a show of giving them to him in front of the patient. Works every time.

I'd report him, but I'm worried I'd lose the job. He's related to the jerk I'd report to, and they're very close. He's been at the company forever with a good reputation, while I'm brand new. And so on...
Your "education" as an EMT does not prepare you to know when gloves are and are not required other than obvious bodily fluids. The writers of the EMT books know that the level of knowledge sucks so bad that they have to tell you to put gloves on for every patient, because they know that the EMT cannot be expected to know when it is really appropriate. Doctors I shadow and RNs wear gloves only around 30-40 percent of the time they touch patients. Also, you are being very inappropriate by forcing this paramedic to place his gloves on in front of the patient. I second the notion that you are making big noise over something you know nothing about, and you are on your way to being "that guy" at your company who no one will want to work with if you keep it up.
 

harkj

Forum Crew Member
60
0
0
i agree with medic 417 when youve worked on an ambulance for awhile you learn when you need gloves and when you dont need gloves....im pretty sure you dont go around everywhere wearing gloves...its a personal choice that you make
 

Seaglass

Lesser Ambulance Ape
973
0
0
I'm aware that wearing gloves isn't always necessary. But I do mean always, for this guy. Blood visibly stuck under nails sure looks like a risk to the next patient to me... if I'm wrong, I'll gladly stop dealing with it.
 

harkj

Forum Crew Member
60
0
0
well no thats not good, but he is the medic and you are the emt you really cant tell him what to do even though blood under the nails is nasty maybe take some germx and pass it to him after a call lol i worked with a medic that never wore gloves even when doing IVs at first i thought nasty but alot of people that i work with tare off the the index and middle finger anyways because the gloves we use are really thick in the finger tips. its really up to him but if you have that big of a problem with it go to him about it and then go from there.
 

hottrotter18

Forum Probie
26
0
0
Your "education" as an EMT does not prepare you to know when gloves are and are not required other than obvious bodily fluids. The writers of the EMT books know that the level of knowledge sucks so bad that they have to tell you to put gloves on for every patient, because they know that the EMT cannot be expected to know when it is really appropriate. Doctors I shadow and RNs wear gloves only around 30-40 percent of the time they touch patients. Also, you are being very inappropriate by forcing this paramedic to place his gloves on in front of the patient. I second the notion that you are making big noise over something you know nothing about, and you are on your way to being "that guy" at your company who no one will want to work with if you keep it up.
A captain with a large metropolitan department with 30+ years experience has taught me to ALWAYS wear gloves.
It takes what, 10 seconds to put a simple pair of gloves on while in the rig..
As many of you know, when you walk up to the Patient everything may appear fine, but things can deteriorate quickly from a simple fall injury to cardiac arrest and you have to get your hands dirty..
But hey, i believe in leading by example, so good examples you are
just because others don't wear gloves doesn't make it right.
 

Seaglass

Lesser Ambulance Ape
973
0
0
well no thats not good, but he is the medic and you are the emt you really cant tell him what to do even though blood under the nails is nasty maybe take some germx and pass it to him after a call lol i worked with a medic that never wore gloves even when doing IVs at first i thought nasty but alot of people that i work with tare off the the index and middle finger anyways because the gloves we use are really thick in the finger tips. its really up to him but if you have that big of a problem with it go to him about it and then go from there.
It's not just IVs--I was weirded out when I saw someone do that for the first time too, but I didn't make an issue of it. It's seriously never. He uses sanitizer and washes his hands, but you can still see some gunk under and around the nails when we get the next patient.

So far, I've been doing my best to not make a huge deal of it. He doesn't want them for a patient that isn't spewing something? I don't care. We're approaching someone covered in slime? Then I'll smile and hand them to him along with whatever else he needs. Interestingly, it doesn't happen if we're around medics or higher, but other basics have noticed it.

I've tried bringing it up, but he won't talk. The most I've gotten out of him is that he "doesn't have allergies," but he hates them because they make his hands itch.

My problems with it are mainly because of patient care, but also because I'm worried about keeping my job. We're supposed to report coworkers who violate company policy. I don't know how strict they are about that yet, but I really don't care to find out the hard way.
 

harkj

Forum Crew Member
60
0
0
its not up to you whether your partner wants to wear gloves or not its all up to them thats the thing its personal preference.
 

JPINFV

Gadfly
12,681
193
63
A captain with a large metropolitan department with 30+ years experience has taught me to ALWAYS wear gloves.
It takes what, 10 seconds to put a simple pair of gloves on while in the rig..
As many of you know, when you walk up to the Patient everything may appear fine, but things can deteriorate quickly from a simple fall injury to cardiac arrest and you have to get your hands dirty..
But hey, i believe in leading by example, so good examples you are
just because others don't wear gloves doesn't make it right.
Remind your physician to wear gloves during the entire exam next time you go for a check up. Make sure to tell him that your fire captain said to always wear gloves when dealing with patients.
 

PinkEMT23

Forum Ride Along
6
0
0
Wearing Gloves

Personally I woudn't care what my partner does. If he wants to get some sort of diease then thats his problem not mine. If it is company policy to always wear gloves and you are afraid of getting in trouble. Talk to your partner and tell him that if this doesn't get resolved between the two of you then you will have to solve it another way. If your partner respects you as a person and an EMT he will not continue to do something that bothers you.
 

JPINFV

Gadfly
12,681
193
63
Personally I woudn't care what my partner does. If he wants to get some sort of diease then thats his problem not mine. If it is company policy to always wear gloves and you are afraid of getting in trouble. Talk to your partner and tell him that if this doesn't get resolved between the two of you then you will have to solve it another way. If your partner respects you as a person and an EMT he will not continue to do something that bothers you.
So, wait a minute. If my partner wants me to do something that has absolutely nothing to do with my partner, then it's disrespectful to not follow an ultimatum?
 

PinkEMT23

Forum Ride Along
6
0
0
Your partner is like family. I don't know about you but where I work I spend more time with my partner than I do my own husband. My partner would never do something if he knew I felt uncomfortable about it. I understand that old school medics didn't wear gloves back then. That just wasn't something that they felt was really needed. If it is a company policy it doesn't matter who is uncomfortable with what. Policy is Policy....I'm not getting in trouble for something someone else is doing. And when you do something wrong your partner gets in trouble its called being a team.
 

harkj

Forum Crew Member
60
0
0
Your partner is like family. I don't know about you but where I work I spend more time with my partner than I do my own husband. My partner would never do something if he knew I felt uncomfortable about it. I understand that old school medics didn't wear gloves back then. That just wasn't something that they felt was really needed. If it is a company policy it doesn't matter who is uncomfortable with what. Policy is Policy....I'm not getting in trouble for something someone else is doing. And when you do something wrong your partner gets in trouble its called being a team.
i dido that
 
Top