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Weird situation...

Discussion in 'EMS Talk' started by LanceCorpsman, Feb 17, 2017.

  1. LanceCorpsman

    LanceCorpsman Forum Lieutenant

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    So I volunteer on an ambulance. On the volunteer squad, the supervisor won't let me practice to my full scope (EMT-Intermediate) since I haven't been proctored by anybody with a higher cert than me (only two others, rarely respond). Even though my uniform says EMT-I, I can only practice as a basic.

    At the other EMS agency I work for, I practice to my full scope. My question is that could I be held liable if I don't provide the care that I am licensed to provide if the patient really needs that treatment?
     
  2. Flying

    Flying Mostly Ignorant

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    Volly squads love legislation, take control by looking at your SOPs. Besides that, you typically are only liable up to the care that your agency is licensed to provide.

    There are quite a few paramedics out there who volunteer as EMTs.
     
    LanceCorpsman likes this.
  3. Alan L Serve

    Alan L Serve Forum Lieutenant

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    Is your volunteer squad licensed by your state at your level and your physician medical director has protocols for your volunteer squad for you to practice at that level?
     
  4. LanceCorpsman

    LanceCorpsman Forum Lieutenant

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    The ambulance is fully licensed and has all the meds. We have one more EMT-I and two RNs who volunteer to their full scope.
     
  5. Alan L Serve

    Alan L Serve Forum Lieutenant

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    Then your supervisor doesn't like you.
     
  6. LanceCorpsman

    LanceCorpsman Forum Lieutenant

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    Im not the only one lol. The supervisor (EMT-I) had the RN be proctored by her and refused for months to let them operate to their full scope until the medical director stepped in. Did I mention that the RN is also a flight nurse with 20+ years of experience?
     
  7. Flying

    Flying Mostly Ignorant

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    LanceCorpsman likes this.
  8. hometownmedic5

    hometownmedic5 Forum Captain

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    Sounds like a pretty typical, hacked together, we'll make it up as we go along volley squad to me.

    You can try talking to the guy and working it out. You can jump over his head and go to a director/chief type person, or the medical director. Outside of that, its their barbecue. You have to eat what they serve you...
     
    NomadicMedic likes this.
  9. CALEMT

    CALEMT The Other Guy

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    From what it sounds like he's already past the point of talking to his supervisor. But I'm in agreement. Knowing what you know now you can try to go back and talk to your sup. If he still won't let you practice at your full scope then I would go over his head. That's what I would do.
     
  10. hometownmedic5

    hometownmedic5 Forum Captain

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    The only downside to that plan is, while you may "win", if the sup is a Richard Johnson, it may end up being a Pyrrhic victory.

    I don't know how that specific system works, but things like being assigned as the driver more than not; being assigned to stay back as the desk man during a big event; getting the crappy chores and so on are all possibles. So you may get the on paper nod to work as an I, but never get the chance because the sup is a juvenile clown who feels slighted.

    Or maybe none of that applies to your specific organization. I'm just spit balling based on previous experiences with grown up children in EMS....
     
  11. LanceCorpsman

    LanceCorpsman Forum Lieutenant

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    Yeah this squad has a pretty good reputation throughout the county because of this supervisor. People drive past the department to volunteer at other agencies.
    What this supervisor seems to not understand is that I'm a volunteer... i don't owe the department a damn thing lol
     
  12. EpiEMS

    EpiEMS Forum Deputy Chief

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    @LanceCorpsman Petty tyranny is a good time for this guy, it sounds like. I wouldn't wear a uniform stating a level of practice that I wasn't permitted to practice at. That said, you should have your medical director sign off on people for *medical* matters - it's not like he's saying "you can't drive the ambulance" (which is a purely operational function that doesn't usually require EMS credentials).
     
  13. Tigger

    Tigger Dodges Pucks Community Leader

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    I don't any state regulations could supersede an agency's clearing policies. At one of my jobs right now I can work as a medic only with an FTO, but I can still pick up EMT shifts (for medic pay) while wearing a medic uniform.
     
  14. DrParasite

    DrParasite The fire extinguisher is not just for show

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    I was going to say the same thing... your agency (whether you are paid or volunteer) has a process for which you can operate at your full scope of practice; typically, this processed is capstoned by your medical director clearing you. Until you receive that blessing (and your lack of being able to practice is probably is at the direction of the medical director, and being enforced by the supervisor), your stuck at the BLS level.

    At my former agency, where I worked full time, if you came in with 20 years of experience, you still had to go through the same qualification process as a newbie medic. The supervisors and administration oversee the program. You can go over his head to the medical director if you want, but don't be surprised if he sends you right back to the supervisor with the directive of "follow the chain of command, and follow the process that everyone else has to follow. you aren't as special as you think you are."

    Personally, I have more respect for an agency that actually wants to make sure you know what you are doing before they cut you lose on an ambulance, than one who says "well, since you passed the entry level requirements in a controlled classroom environment, you are all set to go play in the field without any oversight."
     

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