Summer Paramedic programs?

Jonmac92

Forum Ride Along
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OK first off I'm not looking for a one summer program or any snake water solution here. Does anybody know of a program in western Nebraska, Wyoming or the Colorado front range that has paramedic degree or course that are going on during the summer? I'm studying Chemistry / Pre-med right now and Love it!!! i'd rather not stop taking those classes to go back to a community college and take a bunch of courses that are taking up my fall and spring semesters towards working on my bachelors. I worked on a bus for 2 years as a basic and loved it! I had to move though to go to a four year college, my basic didn't transfer and now with all the new changes and such I'll have to go get it again, Bummer, however I really do want to get my paramedic, freaking cool stuff! I'm not looking for an accelerated program or anything just classes i can take that eventually I could get my paramedic. I'm in no huge rush I just know that I would rather not go to say Red rocks community college for a straight two years doing regular semesters to get my paramedic and have two associates degrees and get raped on the transfer process for chemistry/ pre-med. So I guess what I'm saying is that I need like the exact opposite of an accelerated paramedic course, It has to be over the summer. I still have to work to pay for all of this stuff preferably I'd like to be a basic again and work that way. :ph34r:

Thanks for reading!

-Jon
 

wanderingmedic

RN, Paramedic
448
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As long as your NR is current or your state license is current check out Mid Plains Community College.

They have an "accelerated medic program" that runs from the beginning of May to the beginning of August. Everything BUT clinical rotations and NR testing are included in the program. Clinical rotations are completed on your own time somewhere close to you (you have to make arrangements with local agencies to get your clinical done, the school will help with this).

hope this helps. let me know if you find anything else.
 

wildmed

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Jon,
It sounds like your going to school somewhere in CO. Due to colorado shifting to the National scope of practice, as well as the accreditation for students to be eligible to take the National Registry; there are no such programs in existence any more. I was in a similar situation to yours exactly one year ago when I was a student at CU. I waited until after I graduated in december to start paramedic school and I am glad that I had my degree behind me. I am currently in the program at HealthONE and it has been just as or more challenging as anything I did as a science major at CU. Paramedic school, especially a program worth your time, is definitely not something you can do on the "side". I would also strongly consider why you are wanting to go to paramedic school, especially if you are wanting to go to med school. It is not really going to impress adcoms that you went to paramedic school, but only have a few months of experience. If you want to be a Paramedic, Fire/Medic, flight nurse, maybe eventually be an EM or rural PA, than I would say that medic school is definitely worth your time. However if your striving to go to medical school right now, it may not be. So, my advice is wait, strongly reflect on why you want to go to paramedic school, and if you still decide that its for you, apply to a top notch program like HealthONE's and become a top notch medic.
 

wanderingmedic

RN, Paramedic
448
61
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I honestly think its up to you and what you want. Phoenix Fire Dept has one of the nations best save rates, and their medic program is very short. They rely on their new medics gaining experience and deferring to older more experienced medics when the need arises. Like most things in healthcare classroom education is important, but experience is what makes good providers. I have met several medics who have gone through "accelerated" programs and think very highly of their skills and competence. Like I said earlier it comes back to you. If you are willing to put in the effort and ask for help when you need it you should be fine. Even if it might not make a huge difference on a med school app, it's worth it if its something you are willing to put in the work for. Having an extra set of credentials and knowledge is definitely a good thing (however is never a substitute for common sense).

In terms of credentialing MPCC will retain theirs, and paramedic licenses are typically easier to get reciprocity with since the training is much more standard across the US - unlike EMT-B training. If you went to MPCC you could get your license in Nebraska (which is free, NE does not have any license or application fees) and then apply for licensure in the state you want to practice in through reciprocity.
 

CFal

Forum Captain
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As long as your NR is current or your state license is current check out Mid Plains Community College.

They have an "accelerated medic program" that runs from the beginning of May to the beginning of August. Everything BUT clinical rotations and NR testing are included in the program. Clinical rotations are completed on your own time somewhere close to you (you have to make arrangements with local agencies to get your clinical done, the school will help with this).

hope this helps. let me know if you find anything else.

I'm going to check that out maybe next year, that would be a great schedule for Ski Patrollers working winters.
 

Tigger

Dodges Pucks
Community Leader
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I honestly think its up to you and what you want. Phoenix Fire Dept has one of the nations best save rates, and their medic program is very short. They rely on their new medics gaining experience and deferring to older more experienced medics when the need arises. Like most things in healthcare classroom education is important, but experience is what makes good providers. I have met several medics who have gone through "accelerated" programs and think very highly of their skills and competence. Like I said earlier it comes back to you. If you are willing to put in the effort and ask for help when you need it you should be fine. Even if it might not make a huge difference on a med school app, it's worth it if its something you are willing to put in the work for. Having an extra set of credentials and knowledge is definitely a good thing (however is never a substitute for common sense).

I have no issue with courses that operate on the accelerated type model. Hours are hours, and many people can succeed at taking classes five days a week like a fulltime job. However, the content of these classes must still be equal to that of their contemporaries, if an instructor ever says "we really don't have time to go over this," there is an issue and I would like more skeptically at such a program.

Thinking that you can skimp on initial education (and realistically nearly every medic program in the country is doing this as that is the standard) and make it up from learning OTJ from more "experienced" (not more knowledgeable mind you) providers is a recipe for failure.
 

CFal

Forum Captain
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I have no issue with courses that operate on the accelerated type model. Hours are hours, and many people can succeed at taking classes five days a week like a fulltime job. However, the content of these classes must still be equal to that of their contemporaries, if an instructor ever says "we really don't have time to go over this," there is an issue and I would like more skeptically at such a program.

Thinking that you can skimp on initial education (and realistically nearly every medic program in the country is doing this as that is the standard) and make it up from learning OTJ from more "experienced" (not more knowledgeable mind you) providers is a recipe for failure.

You still have the 230 Clinical and 200 hours of Field training after the 12 weeks.
 

chaz90

Community Leader
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You'll find that more experienced providers do not necessarily equal better. Many medics I've met may have done this job for 20 years, but also tend to repeat that first year of mistakes 19 times. A solid foundation for Paramedicine needs to come from a comprehensive educational program supplemented by quality instruction from experienced providers that have kept up with changes in science and medicine.

BTW Wildmed, have fun at HealthOne. I graduated from CSU last May and attended PEP 98 at HealthOne. Say hi to Dennis and the part-timers from my class for me.
 

Obstructions

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I have an option that would be year round, but go at your own pace.

I know on this forum online EMS education is sort of shunned, but you really should look into PERCOM Online. They are a small education company based out of Abilene, TX, and the education you get there is absolutely stunning. I am going to warn you, it is not for the faint of heart. You will be getting lots of exams, and lots of papers to write, but it is so worth it. You will find yourself a much better clinician than your peers.

I am currently a P2 (they split paramedic into two parts) student, there. I would highly recommend. I will warn you that admissions and the company administration itself is slow and somewhat unhelpful, but once you get into the education you will realized you chose the right place. Better start finding copies of Journal of EM and Anesthesiology soon!

Only downside for you is it requires 6 trips down to Texas for PERCOM skills testing and training. After that, you will be required to find a spot to test national registry, or will test in Texas. They have a billion clinical sites around Texas for you to choose from, but you also have the option to help set up sites around your hometown as well if you wish. My recommendation (which is also what I am doing with this program, is start the didactic portion in September and try to finish it all in May with all the skills sessions done. That leaves your clinical and precepting time to the summer, where you will have plenty of time to finish it.)

Good luck. Hope you figure out a solution.
 
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