Starting EMT school soon

christophersneed16

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Hello all i am starting school for EMT soon i just wanted to find out what the difference between a paramedic and an EMT is. Like the difference in duties. I am excited but scared about the national testing and certification as well. Im also worried about being able to find a job right out of school.
 
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christophersneed16

Forum Ride Along
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That was great but one thing it did not answer is the fact that is an emt the one in the back with the patient on the way to the hospital or is he the one driving. And are emts allowed to put in and start ivs
 

NPO

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EMT is a basic certification where as Paramedic is a more advanced certification that requires additional trainings and education. Most people recommend several years of experience before becoming a paramedic.

There are also going to be local differences between EMT and paramedic that you can only learn through asking people who work in your geographic area.
 

VentMonkey

k’uhul ajaw
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Slow down, take deep breaths, and don’t put the cart before the horse.

You’ll learn—or should—all that you need to in EMT class. I wouldn’t worry about anything except getting through the course.

So don’t worry too much about the different level providers (again, it should be made clear in your training). I certainly wouldn’t worry about the NR exam yet either.

One day at a time, OP. GL.
 

Lo2w

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That was great but one thing it did not answer is the fact that is an emt the one in the back with the patient on the way to the hospital or is he the one driving. And are emts allowed to put in and start ivs
As others said, it's going to depend on your region and individual systems. My first 911 gig did not allow the EMT to be the lead and write even a BLS call. We could assist the medic within our scope and on critical calls would ride with the medic in back, fire driving.

My new gig is much more invested in building up EMTs and allows us to take lead on appropriate calls.

As to IVs, generally no. Colorado is the one exception I know. Not sure if other states allow basics to certify on IVs.
 

joshrunkle35

EMT-P/RN
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EMTs are like a super-advanced lifeguard. They have a lot of knowledge in stabilizing threats to life, but the initial training doesn't really go in-depth into medicine. The thinking is very straightforward: If A, do B, if B, do C, etc... There are some new concepts and some memorization, but it's not really any more difficult than a CPR or a lifeguarding class. Just show up, do whatever homework they tell you to do, pay attention and do some practice tests (your instructor will probably give you advise on these). Classes are about 120-400 hours depending on the state. Most EMT classes are probably about 150-200 hours. You usually spend a day or two (total, not every week) on a truck and a day or two in the hospital practicing some skills and taking in the new experience of interacting with patients.

Paramedics are EMTs first. They might be an EMT for 10 years or 10 days before Paramedic school. Either way, they need to be able to perform all of the EMT skills and demonstrate all of the EMT knowledge at the beginning of schooling. Paramedics build upon the idea of stabilizing threats to life and add in a lot of medical knowledge to be able to be a resource for most medical calls. While all of EMS focuses on some degree of transport to a more definitive type of care (read: physician, PA, NP), Paramedics focus on a lifetime of learning so that they can avoid unnecessary and costly transports by providing the definitive care for a small number of calls. Some paramedic schools in the US might be as little as 900 hours. Some might be as high as 4,000-5,000 hours. Paramedic schooling in some countries like the UK or Australia might be as much as double this. Depending on the length of a paramedic program, you are probably in school 2-3 days a week and on a truck or in the hospital 2-3 days a week.

My experience was that EMT school was about 15-20 hours a week and Paramedic school was about 50-60 hours a week. My EMT class was as easy as a driver's ed class, cpr class or lifeguarding class. My Paramedic school was harder than my RN degree.
 
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