Self Study

CityEMT212

Forum Crew Member
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Hi EMS Family,

So, at the risk of sounding like I'm immensely fretting, which I kind of am - I'm seeking advice again on studying for my upcoming state exam next month. As (I think) I mentioned in another post, I regrettably don't feel like I'm confident enough to pass because the course content is not thorough - and I've been able to pass our module tests because I remember information from when I was a working EMT before. However, the current instructor is inconveniently unobliging to all student's inquiries during our courses and, not surprisingly, we have lamented our concerns to the Doctor who oversees this program as well as requested refunds from the agency. We were told its too late for a refund (course is half over) but they claim they'll talk to the Instructor. As an example, the Instructor told us recently not to review or study from our textbook we were told to get for the class because it is a National Standard book - and we truly were confused. When discussing my dilemma with other EMS friends of mine in person, they all advised me to in fact study from the book because the course content uses information from it. I've been feverishly reading the book over and studying our most recent DOH State protocols to CMA (cover my arse), but almost feel as though I do not need to return to the classes.

Any advice any one of you can share would be appreciated.
 

mgr22

Forum Asst. Chief
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What helped me study most of all for NYS written exams was practice with multiple choice questions. I know of one EMT text, "Prehospital Care" by Henry and Stapleton, that included a workbook with hundreds of questions similar to the ones on the state test. I'm not sure what edition they're up to; my most recent is the 4th, from 2012.
 

DrParasite

The fire extinguisher is not just for show
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It's been 15 years since I took the NYS exam.... and each region of NYS has slightly different protocols, so take what I say with a grain of salt....

most EMT exams (as well as EMT classes) are based on national standards, with a few state specific stuff thrown in (usually drug doses). Be familiar with your state protocols, particularly what comes first (remember BSI and scene safety, and your first intervention should be to open the airway).

The EMT exam (in general) is not hard; it's a lot of information, and a lot of processes to learn about various topics (OB/GYN was still my weak spot), and some words that you should know the definitions to that are unique to medicine. But you need to have a firm grasp of the general concepts, which, if you are doing well in class, you should have.
 

CityEMT212

Forum Crew Member
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I'll heed the advice you have both given. I'm familiar with the "Prehospital Care" textbook, it was used in 2010 for my first EMT-B Class, and it was great. My weak spot is the pathway of blood flow through the heart and the oxygenated/deoxygenated blood. I will review all of it thoroughly. Thanks Dr. Parasite and MGR22.
 

VentMonkey

Ajaw
Premium Member
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Toilet Paper My Arse... TPMA = ?
Yes. Search it up. It may help your self-professed weak area.

Acronyms are oftentimes force fed in EMT class, but this one is still pertinent for me, in my area of practice, respectively.
 
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