Requirements on becoming an ER Technician

Amaliagrace

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Hi everyone, I’m new to this site so I apologize if I didn’t post this question in the correct forum. I’m currently on the journey to becoming a PA, and as of right now I’m a few weeks away from getting my CNA license so I can start building up my PCE. Long story short I would eventually like to start working in the ER as a tech, and I would like to know if I will need any additional training? A lot of the job openings in my area say that certified phlebotomist or having an IV certification is “preferred,” should I go ahead and get a phlebotomy certification as well? Or will my future experience as a CNA be enough to land me a job in the ER?
 

PotatoMedic

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Every er is different. Some want emt, some don't, some like emt but require cna, some will take anyone with a pulse. Some require phlebotomy training.

Honestly without looking at the job description of the specific er job toy want to apply to there is no way to tell what else you may need.
 

MedicFF

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I’ll echo PotatoMedic’s accurate statement. Like they said, look at the duties outlined in the job description. Even within the same state (i.e. California), you can have different duties and expectations within the same job title of ED Tech. It blows my mind that any ED manager, admin above them, or attending physician in the ED would be fine with personnel who don’t have BLS training and certification involved in a code.

The New England states seem to have an affinity for ED paramedics and allow you to practice under your license with full scope and then some. In some hospitals in places like North Carolina, ED Techs or MAs don’t have any responsibility for cleaning rooms and dressing beds. They have EVS do all that.

Props to you for realizing that PCE is imperative for PA success, not just with the application process. Spend some time in the ED at a teaching hospital and you’ll be surprised many residents are called “Doctor” but lack proper bedside manner or confidence due to lack of prior PCE.

As for phleb/IV certs and requirements, that will also vary by state and individual hospital. However, if PA is your intended destination, don’t sidestep the benefit of learning vascular anatomy and skills to gain vascular access. All such things will only make you a better provider.
 

Emily Starton

Forum Crew Member
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I’ll echo PotatoMedic’s accurate statement. Like they said, look at the duties outlined in the job description. Even within the same state (i.e. California), you can have different duties and expectations within the same job title of ED Tech. It blows my mind that any ED manager, admin above them, or attending physician in the ED would be fine with personnel who don’t have BLS training and certification involved in a code.

The New England states seem to have an affinity for ED paramedics and allow you to practice under your license with full scope and then some. In some hospitals in places like North Carolina, ED Techs or MAs don’t have any responsibility for cleaning rooms and dressing beds. They have EVS do all that.

Props to you for realizing that PCE is imperative for PA success, not just with the application process. Spend some time in the ED at a teaching hospital and you’ll be surprised many residents are called “Doctor” but lack proper bedside manner or confidence due to lack of prior PCE.

As for phleb/IV certs and requirements, that will also vary by state and individual hospital. However, if PA is your intended destination, don’t sidestep the benefit of learning vascular anatomy and skills to gain vascular access. All such things will only make you a better provider.
Agreed, this might be the answer to your question Amaliagrace.
 

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