Question about IV in foot

Guardian

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Years ago, I remember someone warning me about starting IV's in pt's feet. I think the reasoning behind this was fear of hitting some artery or vein (maybe arcuate) that leads almost directly to the heart. My question is what dangers or problems (if any) are involved with IV access to someone's foot.

Thanks
 

Stevo

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well i would think that a patient laying down vs. standing may make a difference.....
 

lfsvr0114

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You do have to be very careful if the pt. is diabetic, due to poor circulation-healing after the iv is removed. Diabetics take longer to heal from any wound and have a higher incident of infection.
 

Flight-LP

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With the new arrival of alternate forms of venous access, an IV in the foot is no longer needed nor recommended. Plus it become a major inconvenience for many flight crews as most configurations do not allow access to the patients feet.
 

Ridryder911

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Ditto, however I routinely start I.V.'s in the foot (especially children) if there is no hx of DM. A vein is a vein, no matter where it is ( yes, I do mean no matter where). Especially if they are going to routinely admitted (not transported to another hospital) I just started on one on the abdominal wall the other day......infused well enough to rehydrate and obtain another site later the next day.

I still am hesitant on using the EZ I/O on conscious patients, I know many only rate it 3/10.. will have to investigate it further.

R/r 911
 

Guardian

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Thanks for your posts everyone, great points. I was waiting for you to comment Rid. I figure if Rid doesn't have a problem with it, then it's ok. I too have started foot IVs on kids. It's just that someone planted that stupid idea in my head years ago and I haven't been able to let it go.
 

Guardian

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Ridryder911 said:
Ditto, however I routinely start I.V.'s in the foot (especially children) if there is no hx of DM. A vein is a vein, no matter where it is ( yes, I do mean no matter where). Especially if they are going to routinely admitted (not transported to another hospital) I just started on one on the abdominal wall the other day......infused well enough to rehydrate and obtain another site later the next day.

I still am hesitant on using the EZ I/O on conscious patients, I know many only rate it 3/10.. will have to investigate it further.

R/r 911

"yes I do mean no matter where"......I'll have to specify no penis IVs in my living will.

Seriously, ever heard of this?
 

daemonicusxx

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yes i have, our medical director loves to tell that story. "i once started a dorsal vein IV in the penis" blah blah blah. i think its funny. if i had to start one, it would only be if for some reason i couldnt get a sternal IO
 

akflightmedic

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Have to agree with Rid. AN IV is an IV....I have done many an unusual IVs...lol

Biceps, shoulders, feet and abdominal(only did that once, but it worked).

However, with the addition of the EZ IO, I have not had to resort to those sites for a couple years now. Rid, I have done it on concious patients and was amazed at how little complaints there were. It is over before they knew it started and I get no more reaction than a regular IV attempt. Granted, you do need discretion. The ones I have performed it on were in need of immediate intervention, despite still being concious. I would not advocate it for a routine IV that you just can't get...lol.
 

Jon

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I've seen FINGER veins used, when they couldn't get anything else...

I heard the same warning.. anthough I think mine also mentioned DVT... not sure, though.
 

Guardian

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Deep Venous Thrombosis........interesting Jon, I'm going to do some research on this and see if I can find anything....thanks
 

Rangat

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We had a pt at Johannesburg Hospital like that. He had a lumber spine #, and a priaprism. He was peripheraly so shut down thei couldn't get a line up anywhere. So they put up an IV Penis. But sadly he died anyway. Interesting though.

But my lecturer said he really wouldn't have. But then again, a jugular is on his scope.
 
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