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Pathophysiology book

Discussion in 'Education and Training' started by Dirty Randy, Apr 20, 2017 at 3:25 AM.

  1. Dirty Randy

    Dirty Randy Forum Ride Along

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    I am looking for a good pathophysiology for pre-hospital workers.

    I have "Clinical Pathophysiology made Ridiculously Simple", but it discusses a lot of lab values, something we can't check in the rig. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. SpecialK

    SpecialK Forum Captain

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    I really like Pathologic Basis of Disease.
     
  3. E tank

    E tank Forum Captain

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    IMHO, whatever pathophysiology text you choose, be sure to have in hand a solid (normal) physiology text to go with it. Arthur Guyton was kind of "the guy" in my circles. Patho without "normal" is kind of meaningless. If given the rhetorical choice between being an expert at normal v. pathophysiology, I'd pick "normal" every time.
     
    VentMonkey likes this.
  4. Remi

    Remi Forum Deputy Chief Premium Member

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    I think any patho book that goes into any decent depth is probably going to reference labs and imaging and other things that don't necessarily have direct application to the ambulance
     
  5. ExpatMedic0

    ExpatMedic0 B.S. paramedicine, NRP, CCEMT-P

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    I can tell you which one NOT to get: "Pathophysiology : The Biologic Basis for Disease in Adults and Children by Kathryn L. McCance RN and Sue E. Huether RN. It was terrible. Easily one of the worst textbooks I have ever had for a class. Terribly formatted/organized, written poorly, and just all around bad. If your buying one for yourself and not a class, read the Amazon reviews. I also own " "Clinical Pathophysiology made Ridiculously Simple, " but this is just an overview book, almost as a study guide or for notes and not an actual pathophysiology textbook. I have heard very good things from colleagues about Robbins book Pathologic Basis of Disease. but I am not sure if this a pathology book in which you would also need a physiology book to accompany it (such as Guyton Physiology). I would also keep in mind those books are what my friend used in medical school, so I am not sure how in-depth you want to go...
     
  6. E tank

    E tank Forum Captain

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    Do not buy any nursing text books unless they are a requirement for a course. Any medical reference books you buy for your own personal enrichment should be medical texts and usually it is the well known authors that are worth the money you end up shelling out.
     
    rescue1 likes this.
  7. rescue1

    rescue1 Forum Captain

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    I used Costanzo's physiology in medical school and found it pretty easy to read, as med school textbooks go. My only caution is, like most textbooks, some of the example medications they use can be pretty outdated--so they may use digoxin to explain a concept about cardiac output, even though digoxin is rarely used in modern practice. I've heard good things about Guyton too, but I never read it.

    For pathophysiology I'm not so sure. We use Robbin's Pathologic Basis of Disease, but it is DENSE, and big enough to kill a grown man with. If you can read it, it's the med school gold standard.

    Both physio and pathophys are best understood with a knowledge of lab values. Even if you can't check them in the truck, I would say they're good to learn. In fact, they're probably good to learn even if you never open a physio textbook.
     
  8. rescue1

    rescue1 Forum Captain

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  9. Remi

    Remi Forum Deputy Chief Premium Member

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    Guyton & Hall, as others have mentioned, is excellent, as is Ganong's Review of Medical Physiology. Another one that I like a lot is Medical Physiology - Principles for Clinical Medicine by Rhoades; it seems a little more modern in its layout and design and is a little easier to read than the others. Note that these are all written for heavy duty graduate level study, and do not make for easy reading.

    For the casual autodidact, I would recommend Human Physiology: An Integrated Approach by Silverthorn. It is a comprehensive text, probably not quite as in depth as the others but much more accessible and easier to read, which means you might understand and retain more. A "non majors" text, I guess you could call it, but a really good one.

    I know these are physiology and not pathophysiology texts, but the two go hand in hand.
     

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