Paramedic to RN bridge?

NYMedic828

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So, I am starting to explore my options with getting into a BSN and it was brought to my attention that paramedic to RN programs exist online.

I don't really quite know what it means to get a "GN" (graduate nurse)

But my goal is ultimately to get a BSN that I can move on to NP with.

Has anyone looked into this? Is anyone doing it? (I prefer to do an online program)
 

silver

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So, I am starting to explore my options with getting into a BSN and it was brought to my attention that paramedic to RN programs exist online.

I don't really quite know what it means to get a "GN" (graduate nurse)

But my goal is ultimately to get a BSN that I can move on to NP with.

Has anyone looked into this? Is anyone doing it? (I prefer to do an online program)

can you give an example of "graduate nurse?" I have only heard it used to describe someone who has passed a program that meets the requirements for RN, but has not become licensed yet. AKA like a post-grad training program.
 

medictmfl

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Careful with the "online" format. I was thinking of taking the same route but after a little research I found that many states will not grant a license to graduates from these programs. Make sure the program has actual clinical rotations as this is the problem most states have with online bridges. I broke down and enrolled in a "mixed" program, some online, some in classroom, on-site labs, and in-hospital clinical. Contact the state nursing boards of the states you may work in and they can tell you what the requirements are. Hope this helps
 

VFlutter

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Graduate Nurse is a person who has graduated with their BSN but has not yet past their NCLEX. Depending on the state/institution you are allowed to work as a GN for 30-60 days before you are required to have your license. This is less common since many places will not hire you until you pass NCLEX.

Do you have an AAS? Most bridge programs are associate in paramedicne to associate in nursing. Then you would would have to do a RN-BSN bridge.

You may be better off just enrolling in a traditional BSN program. I would stay away from online programs, it may put you at a disadvantage when applying for jobs and I know many MSN programs will not accept them.
 
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NYMedic828

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Graduate Nurse is a person who has graduated with their BSN but has not yet past their NCLEX. Depending on the state/institution you are allowed to work as a GN for 30-60 days before you are required to have your license. This is less common since many places will not hire you until you pass NCLEX.

Do you have an AAS? Most bridge programs are associate in paramedicne to associate in nursing. Then you would would have to do a RN-BSN bridge.

You may be better off just enrolling in a traditional BSN program. I would stay away from online programs, it may put you at a disadvantage when applying for jobs and I know many MSN programs will not accept them.

I have 60 credits in fire science at the local community college. Essentially worthless so I have to start from the bottom.

I was curious if I could do whatever paramedic to RN, and then attend a real school for ADN to BSN. My medic is strictly vocational but is from an accredited agency for up to 39 college credits (I would have to go to a school and pay for the accreditation). I figured applying for jobs as an online nurse is not desirable but I have no desire to work as at an ADN level. I just wan't to figure out the fastest route for me to BSN.

With the hopes of being in a 5 month fire academy in January, I was unable to start any classes at a physical school and won't be able to for another year or more. I don't want to let that year slide by when I could be getting a move on things.


So far the only thing I have found is this

http://www.excelsior.edu/nursing-programs-designed-for-professionals

Which I think is saying you get credit towards clinical hours for having completed paramedic. I have no problem completing every class necessary to get a BSN but if I can save time and money it is obviously better for me...
 
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dalman97

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Check out allnurses.com ... it's a forum with TONS of info and excelsior is a big topic there too.
 

Wheel

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I have 60 credits in fire science at the local community college. Essentially worthless so I have to start from the bottom.

I was curious if I could do whatever paramedic to RN, and then attend a real school for ADN to BSN. My medic is strictly vocational but is from an accredited agency for up to 39 college credits (I would have to go to a school and pay for the accreditation). I figured applying for jobs as an online nurse is not desirable but I have no desire to work as at an ADN level. I just wan't to figure out the fastest route for me to BSN.

With the hopes of being in a 5 month fire academy in January, I was unable to start any classes at a physical school and won't be able to for another year or more. I don't want to let that year slide by when I could be getting a move on things.


So far the only thing I have found is this

http://www.excelsior.edu/nursing-programs-designed-for-professionals

Which I think is saying you get credit towards clinical hours for having completed paramedic. I have no problem completing every class necessary to get a BSN but if I can save time and money it is obviously better for me...

I've considered doing this too, excelsior for adn then a "real school" (as in my state school) for the bsn. That way I'd be applying for grad school and jobs with the bsn. I'm definitely not convinced it's a good idea though, especially in this economy. Honestly my main motivation for this would be to miss out on the white scrubs :p
 

VFlutter

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I would be very careful and make sure you do the research on Excelsior. I know a few years ago not all states would except the program, not sure if that has changed.

I know you said you eventually want to be a NP. I would call the college you plan on attending and make sure that this will not be a problem. They may "accept" it but it may put you at a huge disadvantage.

But as you said it may be the best option for you and I am not trying to scare you away. I believe there is a flight medic on FlightWeb who went through Excelsior and is now a CRNA. However I believe that is probably a very rare occurrence. When you are applying for a CRNA program with 5 spots and 50 applicants it might put you at the back of the line.
 

Anjel

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The program I am going to do is Medic to Rn then that transitions to RN to BSN.

You must work 6 months full time as a medic before applying. There are 4ish prerequisites to take prior to applying for the program and the entrance exam.

The majority of classes are online. Which I currently have mixed feelings about. I am not entirely sure what I am getting myself into.
 
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NYMedic828

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I would be very careful and make sure you do the research on Excelsior. I know a few years ago not all states would except the program, not sure if that has changed.

I know you said you eventually want to be a NP. I would call the college you plan on attending and make sure that this will not be a problem. They may "accept" it but it may put you at a huge disadvantage.

But as you said it may be the best option for you and I am not trying to scare you away. I believe there is a flight medic on FlightWeb who went through Excelsior and is now a CRNA. However I believe that is probably a very rare occurrence. When you are applying for a CRNA program with 5 spots and 50 applicants it might put you at the back of the line.

Due to this fact, I am only looking to do ADN online because right now is the time where I can't physically attend a classroom. In a year, I will be able to do so. But I don't want to sit on my *** right now when I could be preparing my future.

I think if my BSN is from a real school it won't matter much.

Excellsior is actually located in NY, so I am pretty sure they accept it here but I am going to make some phonecalls tomorrow.
 

silver

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Due to this fact, I am only looking to do ADN online because right now is the time where I can't physically attend a classroom. In a year, I will be able to do so. But I don't want to sit on my *** right now when I could be preparing my future.

I think if my BSN is from a real school it won't matter much.

Excellsior is actually located in NY, so I am pretty sure they accept it here but I am going to make some phonecalls tomorrow.

Don't count on it. I don't know where you are looking, but it will definitely make it more difficult in some places (eg. academic medical centers or anywhere in a city)
 
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NYMedic828

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Alright so it's completely a waste of time for me to attempt this route.

Basically I would have to get my RN license through excelsior, and then the local nursing school here has an excelsior diploma program to an assosciates.

So im basically doing the work for two associates degrees and not having a bachelors.

Easier to just start from the ground up.
 
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WTEngel

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I don't know how it is in your neck of the woods, but there are more nurses being produced down here than overall desirable nursing jobs available.

5-7 years ago new grad nurses could walk in and name their price here in Texas. Now it is not the case. Magnet facilities are requiring BSN at a minimum for management jobs, and hiring managers have the option to choose from a pool of applicants that includes Excelsior ADNs, traditional ADNs (who may or may not have done clinicals at the facility they are applying at) and traditional BSNs. Which employee would you choose?

Unfortunately HR managers are the gate keepers for these jobs, and your competence or skills set is not even going to be evaluated unless you meet the educational threshold to get in the door for an interview.

My advice for those seeking to become an RN is do the traditional BSN, and be prepared for a master's.
 
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NYMedic828

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I don't know how it is in your neck of the woods, but there are more nurses being produced down here than overall desirable nursing jobs available.

5-7 years ago new grad nurses could walk in and name their price here in Texas. Now it is not the case. Magnet facilities are requiring BSN at a minimum for management jobs, and hiring managers have the option to choose from a pool of applicants that includes Excelsior ADNs, traditional ADNs (who may or may not have done clinicals at the facility they are applying at) and traditional BSNs. Which employee would you choose?

Unfortunately HR managers are the gate keepers for these jobs, and your competence or skills set is not even going to be evaluated unless you meet the educational threshold to get in the door for an interview.

My advice for those seeking to become an RN is do the traditional BSN, and be prepared for a master's.

I have no desire to be an ADN nurse. I wasn't sure if it was easier to do medic to ADN and ADN to BSN though, which it isn't. Medic is worthless.

I am going to schedule an advisory meeting but my goal is to go straight to NP and then work on a Ph.D. Unless experience is a requirement of NP school, I probably won't work as an RN.
 

WTEngel

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I think programs that allow students to go straight through to nurse practitioner should be banned. The experience nurses have going in to NP programs is the only reason they are remotely qualified to step up to mid level. If your desire is to go straight to NP, then why not seek out a PA program, which is specifically focused on training those wishing to go straight to mid level provider.

Are you seeking a short cut to becoming a mid level provider? As with all education, short cuts usually lead to consequences...

NP programs are all trending to DNP, which is mandated by 2015. Do you intend to do a lot of research? Why the desire to hold both the DNP and PhD?
 
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NYMedic828

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I think programs that allow students to go straight through to nurse practitioner should be banned. The experience nurses have going in to NP programs is the only reason they are remotely qualified to step up to mid level. If your desire is to go straight to NP, then why not seek out a PA program, which is specifically focused on training those wishing to go straight to mid level provider.

Are you seeking a short cut to becoming a mid level provider? As with all education, short cuts usually lead to consequences...

NP programs are all trending to DNP, which is mandated by 2015. Do you intend to do a lot of research? Why the desire to hold both the DNP and PhD?

Sorry I meant my end goal was DNP. And that is the reason I do not want to be a PA.

Nursing is a more progressively trained field. PA I have to first acquire a bachelors I have no interest in and then continue to PA.

I am going to be doing all of this working full time as a firefighter. Atleast with RN should I decide to stop and take breaks, that option is open to me.

I don't see how doing all the necessary schooling is a shortcut. If a school doesn't require experience and they are one of the most reputable schools in the area then why would I slow myself down?

I'm sure they require experience as I presume it to be competitive entry but if they don't then that isn't my problem...

It will be long past 2015 by the time I even finish a BSN. I am just planning here... I have minimum 4 years from whenever I decide to even start my BSN.
 

WTEngel

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Fair enough, to each their own.

Please don't take my comments as attacking or accusatory, but I have been in the same place as you, many years ago, and asked similar questions.

You talk about getting a bachelor's degree you have no interest in, yet you talk about getting a BSN simply as a means to an end. That is getting a bachelor's degree you are not interested in, right?

The sciences required for PA school will be much more beneficial than the sciences required for most nursing programs. The difference between science courses for majors students and those offered to allied health students is pretty stark. I have sat in both.

I also think there are PA schools that require only an associates plus the required science pre requisites. They may be being phased out, but there are still programs out there that do not require a bachelor's degree. In fact there are med schools that do not require a bachelor's degree believe it or not...(they do, for the most part require a minimum of 90 hours, which is mostly pre requisites.)

I completely understand you point about being working full time, and being able to take a break between phases of your plan. I have also seen lots of people "take a break" for the last 7-10 years of their career. Not saying it will happen to you, but making decent money as a nurse it becomes easy to settle.

Sounds like you are on the right track, sniffing things out. Don't be tempted to take shortcuts, you may find yourself years down the road wishing you had made different decisions...
 
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NYMedic828

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Fair enough, to each their own.

Please don't take my comments as attacking or accusatory, but I have been in the same place as you, many years ago, and asked similar questions.

You talk about getting a bachelor's degree you have no interest in, yet you talk about getting a BSN simply as a means to an end. That is getting a bachelor's degree you are not interested in, right?

The sciences required for PA school will be much more beneficial than the sciences required for most nursing programs. The difference between science courses for majors students and those offered to allied health students is pretty stark. I have sat in both.

I also think there are PA schools that require only an associates plus the required science pre requisites. They may be being phased out, but there are still programs out there that do not require a bachelor's degree. In fact there are med schools that do not require a bachelor's degree believe it or not...(they do, for the most part require a minimum of 90 hours, which is mostly pre requisites.)

I completely understand you point about being working full time, and being able to take a break between phases of your plan. I have also seen lots of people "take a break" for the last 7-10 years of their career. Not saying it will happen to you, but making decent money as a nurse it becomes easy to settle.

Sounds like you are on the right track, sniffing things out. Don't be tempted to take shortcuts, you may find yourself years down the road wishing you had made different decisions...

The taking a break for 7-10 years is one reason I prefer not to stop. I know of I am working as a nurse and a firefighter making $150-200k a year, It will be very hard to adjust to dropping 50k+ a year to return to school.

My other issue with PAs is that I have family members who are physicians and the attitude in many places towards PAs is not preferable. Many people see PA as a shortcut to playing doctor.

PA also seems to be pretty terminal in itself. A DNP is a very long term goal but atleast it leaves something for the end.

The BSN is a means to an end but it is relevant and interesting to me VS. a random degree in science as a means to be a PA. Should I decide not to move forward, atleast I can work as an RN and not some random biology related job who won't hire me.

I am trying to schedule an admissions meeting to see if I can acquire 60 credits of prerequisites at the community college and then only have to pay for nursing classes. (Would save me $60,000) but it all depends on how many outside credits they accept.
 
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DrankTheKoolaid

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I researched this when I was still interested in nursing also. Don't completely rule out Excelsior as there are very big loop holes. If you want to work in a particular state that does not except Excelsior graduates for initial licensing simply go to any other state that does and get your state card. Work 6 months and then the other states will accept you, at least California does and they are the worst about it.
 
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