Paramedic or LPN???

RunnerD1987

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Hey hey!!!
Question is in the title ^

I have worked in healthcare since I was in my early 20s and now 31 going on 32 in a few months.
I never really had any goal or career path until maybe 4 years ago. Did receive my Bachelors Degree when I was 25. I tried for nursing I did the prereqs and was averaging around a B+ with my nursing GPA.

Right now nursing isn't playing out I have been rejected at least 4 times from a program and withdrew from a program ($60K for a 2 year RN program) for financial reasons.

I am looking for a change up in careers to break out of the monotony of what I have been doing for almost 8 to 9 years at 3 different facilities.
Looking for work that can match my current pay, work closer to home, and have better hours. Right now working 5 variable 8 hour shifts a week with a 60 to 80 minute drive one way burns you out.

I would go the LPN route but the programs in the area are expensive around $30,000 to $40,000. The medic route cost about $10,000 to $12,000 and they make same pay as an LPN. The only downside more job opportunities in my area for LPNs.

Was thinking I could get my medic be in the field for 4 to 6 years. Eventually work on retaking my prereqs shortly after the wife goes back & finishes up her LPN to RN bridge program.

Just curious on medics who went back for their RN. Any pros or cons? What do to you think was your biggest barrier? Did you feel strapped and stressed managing class with work?

Appreciate the feedback.
 

joshrunkle35

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LPN programs are about $3,000. Not $30,000.

Also, if you already have a bachelor’s degree, you should consider a second degree accelerated BSN to become an RN. They are usually 1-2 years.
 

DrParasite

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What do you do now? do you work full time? what is your current title?

you have a BS; as Josh said, look at BS -> BSN programs. 40k for an LPN is pretty pricy; 60k for an RN is even moreso. are there any other options in your area?

I know several medics who took the excelsior program to get their RN. Most are happy, did the program part time, and were successful in their transition. Others didn't complete the program, and are still on a truck.
 

RunnerD1987

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LPN programs are about $3,000. Not $30,000.

Also, if you already have a bachelor’s degree, you should consider a second degree accelerated BSN to become an RN. They are usually 1-2 years.
In our State they run $30K to $40K reason it is a deterrent for me. Though Medics and LPNs make around $20 to $30 an hour depending on where you are working in the State.

Accelerated wouldn't work for the reason I need to work 24 to 32 hours a week. Right now for the next two year's I can't drop from full time for health insurance.
 

joshrunkle35

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In our State they run $30K to $40K reason it is a deterrent for me. Though Medics and LPNs make around $20 to $30 an hour depending on where you are working in the State.

Accelerated wouldn't work for the reason I need to work 24 to 32 hours a week. Right now for the next two year's I can't drop from full time for health insurance.
I work 60-70 hours a week between 3 jobs, have kids and a pregnant wife to take care of and I’m in an accelerated nursing program. It’s only a year or two of your life. It’s not permanent. I’m sure you could make it work if you choose.
 

RunnerD1987

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^^^ Psych Tech. Pay varies by location in the State. So do requirements and skills you can do.

For my current job you need a Bachelors degree or Masters degree. You do phlebotomy, EEGs, blood sugars, vitals, facilitate groups, interview/chart on patients, and few other things.
 

RunnerD1987

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From what I hear only 1 program is doable to work in. Rest are full time a week and about 12 to 18 months. Some make you sign a contract to not work more than 16 hours a week. I feel if I could work nights it would be doable. That's why I was thinking go the Medic route. Could make the same making now, work close to home, work nights, and work 2 to 3 times a week that way can go take an accelerated program down the road.

The cost is up there. Looking at around $20K for the least expensive and $60K for the most expensive.
 

RunnerD1987

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I work 60-70 hours a week between 3 jobs, have kids and a pregnant wife to take care of and I’m in an accelerated nursing program. It’s only a year or two of your life. It’s not permanent. I’m sure you could make it work if you choose.
How is your class schedule?
Why are you going to a private college for nursing? That’s a waste of money.
Yah yah dropped out before being accepted. Just too hard to swing financially. They hook you in because they are part time and acceptance isn't a lottery it's based off points.
 

joshrunkle35

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How is your class schedule?
I’m in a Graduate Entry Option Family Nurse Practitioner program at OSU. This means that I complete RN and FNP simultaneously (sort of).

The RN portion is 5 semesters (Summer, Autumn, Spring, Summer, Autumn), however, I am completing additional nurse practitioner classes at the same time (The non-clinical classes like advanced pathophysiology, advanced pharmacology, Evidence Based Research, Quality Improvement and Informatics, etc). I typically do 3 days a week from about 4am-midnight and then I’m free 4 days a week to work.

Honestly, time-wise, accelerated nursing is still way easier than Paramedic school was. My nursing school is about 50-60 hours/week. Paramedic was 60-90 hours/week (I did a 9 month program instead of 1 year).

ETA: I have completed 1 year in my nursing program
 

RunnerD1987

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Sounds like the reverse here. Medic school is only 3 days a week 8 hours (Clinical's and internship are in Round 2 & 3). Clinical's are twice a week with class once a week. Then internship is 3 12's.

The accelerated nursing programs in my State usually are 5 days a week with 8 to 10 hours of class and clinical's. With exception of one program that only meets 3 to 4 times a week.
 

joshrunkle35

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Sounds like the reverse here. Medic school is only 3 days a week 8 hours (Clinical's and internship are in Round 2 & 3). Clinical's are twice a week with class once a week. Then internship is 3 12's.

The accelerated nursing programs in my State usually are 5 days a week with 8 to 10 hours of class and clinical's. With exception of one program that only meets 3 to 4 times a week.
Yeah, but I don’t think you’re factoring in homework. In nursing school, you have a week to read a chapter. In paramedic school, you have a week to read 5-10 chapters plus 2-3 supplemental books.
 

RunnerD1987

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Yeah, but I don’t think you’re factoring in homework. In nursing school, you have a week to read a chapter. In paramedic school, you have a week to read 5-10 chapters plus 2-3 supplemental books.
That is very true cramming a lot in a short time period!

The medic program looking at has AP1 completed in 7 weeks. Then AP II in another 7 weeks. While in conjunction with 25 weeks of Paramedicine.

I also have to figure out how to balance work. Because right now 5 days on 8 hr shifts sometimes longer with an hour each way commute from home and area schools be about 30. I am hoping work might put me on 2 16's 7 to 1130 and 8 700 to 330 or 300 to 1130. So I have 5 days free a week.
 

VFlutter

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Are we talking California? What state are LPNs making $30/hr? I barely ever see LPNs outside of home health, LTAC, Dr offices, etc. Not sure there job market is all that great in most areas.
 

RunnerD1987

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Are we talking California? What state are LPNs making $30/hr? I barely ever see LPNs outside of home health, LTAC, Dr offices, etc. Not sure there job market is all that great in most areas.
Average $24 to $28. Wife has been on for 3 yrs with her job with differential making around $28 an hr at the nursing home. Her per diem job made around $21 to $22 an hour.
 

CCCSD

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He’s not in CA, we have plenty of colleges that have nursing programs. No mandate to attend private for profit.
 

RunnerD1987

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Thinking if I can lead a full time night gig in the hospital close to home will go straight in for nursing.

If not have to see if work can condense my hours. Then if so decide to go the Medic or LPN route then RN.
 

rujero

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My 2 year associate degree RN program at a community college cost me about $14k. By working between 36 and 44 hours per week as an RN , I made $71k my first year. I know a lot of LPNs and many are fantastic nurses, but they are always expressing frustration over being relegated to the sub-acute care setting with 20+ patient to nurse ratios, working under the direction of an RN for much less money, and without the credentials to pursue many continuing education opportunities and certifications such as CEN or CCRN or other common interests of those coming from the pre-hospital setting. I think it largely depends on what your ideal working environment is. I tutor a student from the South who was working as a Basic and she relocated to attend the same program I did. She will pursue her BSN after she starts working in the ER setting as an RN.

EDIT: I worked three 8 hour overnight shifts a week while in the program. I was blessed to be able to move back in with some family to reduce the cost of rent. I sold my car to eliminate the payment and bought one that was 10+ years old with 165k miles.

-r
 
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RunnerD1987

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My 2 year associate degree RN program at a community college cost me about $14k. By working between 36 and 44 hours per week as an RN , I made $71k my first year. I know a lot of LPNs and many are fantastic nurses, but they are always expressing frustration over being relegated to the sub-acute care setting with 20+ patient to nurse ratios, working under the direction of an RN for much less money, and without the credentials to pursue many continuing education opportunities and certifications such as CEN or CCRN or other common interests of those coming from the pre-hospital setting. I think it largely depends on what your ideal working environment is. I tutor a student from the South who was working as a Basic and she relocated to attend the same program I did. She will pursue her BSN after she starts working in the ER setting as an RN.

EDIT: I worked three 8 hour overnight shifts a week while in the program. I was blessed to be able to move back in with some family to reduce the cost of rent. I sold my car to eliminate the payment and bought one that was 10+ years old with 165k miles.

-r
Will say my goal is to get my RN.

However, do feel to get to Point B might have to go from Point A to Point B.

Right now make about $22 to $24 an hour. Leaving where I work will drop down to $15 to $18 an hour. With my current DTI make about $15 an hour. Now if I can pay down my debt $15 to $18 would make that hourly pay manageable.

The thing is to go back to RN school though I will need to find a night gig I feel. So that's why I was thinking work nights in a job close to home in my current field, as an EMT, LPN or Medic where it is 32 to 36 hours a week.
 

joshrunkle35

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Will say my goal is to get my RN.

However, do feel to get to Point B might have to go from Point A to Point B.

Right now make about $22 to $24 an hour. Leaving where I work will drop down to $15 to $18 an hour. With my current DTI make about $15 an hour. Now if I can pay down my debt $15 to $18 would make that hourly pay manageable.

The thing is to go back to RN school though I will need to find a night gig I feel. So that's why I was thinking work nights in a job close to home in my current field, as an EMT, LPN or Medic where it is 32 to 36 hours a week.
As someone who has done EMT, Paramedic and is now in nursing school, in my opinion, if it is at all possible, you should go straight to a 2nd degree BSN program. Yeah, it’ll be 1-2 hard years with very little sleep if you also work 40 hrs/week, but then you’ll be done.

Also, a lot of schools pay tuition if you work for their hospital system. So, you could make $14/hr as a CNA/PCA/PCT, but then you get free tuition. Most of my class at OSU does that. The loss in wages is worth the free tuition.
 
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