Paramedic College Student - Military RESERVE...

Best Branch of Military for Reserve College Paramedic Student?


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Everett

Forum Crew Member
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RESERVE…

Army – Navy – Air Force – Marines – National Guard – Coast Guard

Greeting everyone! o_O

I’m a 21 year old college student (Sophomore) studying to be a Paramedic. I am currently already a FF/EMT and my plan is to obtain my Bachelors of Science, as well as my Medic (obviously) and pursue a job in a large department. However, for the time being I would like to serve my country IN RESERVE, make some extra cash, and the benefits are certainly a plus as well.

Since I am in college (full time) and I have a part time job, what branch of the military should I look into?

What service is going to allow me to do my basic training (hopefully over the summer) and then return to school in the fall with no other obligations other than my weekend warrior and summer commitments? If applicable, are there any educational perks to this service besides the GI bill like paying back my student loans, etc?

What service is best for EMTs/Paramedics? If applicable, since I already have my EMT would I have to redo the EMT program/curriculum or would I be able to test out?

What can I expect in basic training from this service?

Finally, I’m aware that the military has a plethora of trauma experience to gain in terms of GSWs, etc., however not much medical from my understanding. Therefore, how do healthcare providers keep on top of their medical experience (chest pain, stroke, diabetic, respiratory, etc?)

I’ve Googled this a few times and kind of seem to be getting the run around by some of these sites as they really aren’t too clear… If anyone could help I would greatly appreciate it. ANY information I receive is better than what I currently have. Thank you. Also feel free to contact me directly if you wish by PM or by email everett1@umbc.edu .
 

irishboxer384

Forum Captain
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Hi,

With regards to the things you have completed and ambition I definitely applaud you. If you keep that level of determination up you will certainly do well regardless of career path. Perhaps though you would be better spending your time getting some hands on experience in ONE of those professions? Ie
volunteering as a fire fighter for experience or volunteering as a medic for something.

If you spread yourself too thin you may find you could become a jack of all trades but master of 'eff all.'

With regards to military medics seeing a plethora of combat related wounds- this is very much depends on where you are based, deployed and what job you are doing. Most medical staff in in the military spent most of their time dealing with non-life threatening MEDICAL problems rather than trauma (not every soldier gets shot/suffers catastrophic blast injuries). On specialist teams the story is different however- as they traditionally will not spend year round working in a sickbay environment.

If your passion is fire-fighting then strive for experience in that, same for medic- military is definitely not an exception either, at 21 I'd pick whatever your passion lies in and throw mind body and soul into that, rather than try to do a bit of everything. I realise this post doesnt specifically address your problem, but from personal experience of being former military and medically trained amongst other things it is sound advice (hopefully hahaa).
 

StudMartin

Forum Probie
28
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Talk to a recruiter from each and see what they have to offer. And then double check whatever they have told you before you sign on any lines.
 

WildlandEMT89

Forum Lieutenant
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Well, Marines don't have medical personnel as those spots are all covered by navy personnel. Air force uses medics but pj training is long and I'm not sure on the availability of reserve slots.
Naval corpsmen are able to challenge the national registry for paramedic now I believe, but there is no promise that you will not end up as a dental assistant instead of a fleet marine corpsman. Army has medics but they are at intermediate level from what I have heard.

This is all just bard on what I have heard from various people in different branches.
I have to agree with boxer that if fire is you you should sit down and visualize your end goal and take the path that best serves that, also keep in mind that no career path in the military is guaranteed
 

joshrunkle35

Forum Asst. Chief
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I would do ROTC during college, become an officer, make way more money, and then try (no guarantee) to get into something where you oversee firefighters.

Or, finish college. Go back for two more years to PA school. Then join the military as a PA.

Then become a reservist.
 

Grimes

Forum Asst. Chief
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I actually just received a reply this morning from an Army Reserve recruiter that I e-mailed over the weekend regarding being in the Reserve while in college. Basically, I want the training and to exceed the commitment and do my part for my country (or more specifically for my area), but cannot afford school-wise to even risk deployment, be it over seas or even simply over the state border. To save you that e-mail (though if you still have questions, I strongly encourage you to contact a recruiter), I've quoted the reply I received below.

Thank you for your interest in the United States Army Reserve.

Currently in today's Army there are no active or reserve units that are non deployable. With tensions building around the globe, it takes a multi-tiered force of highly trained, committed Soldiers to protect our freedoms and uphold democracy. This force consists of Active Duty Soldiers and Soldiers in the Army Reserve. These two groups work in tandem to create the most powerful, well-prepared fighting force in the world.

If you are in colledge you may want to look at ROTC as an option. For your covenience I have enclosed the ROTC link for you.

http://www.goarmy.com/rotc/ways-to-attend.html


Here is some basic information on the Army Reserve for you.

There are over 120 jobs in the Army Reserve, the job availability depends on your ASVAB score, what is available during your process, physical results and background information.

http://www.goarmy.com/careers-and-jobs.html

The Army and Army Reserve is also the only Branch of Service to guarantee your Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) or job, in writing. Most importantly you will earn the title of Soldier, as well as the pride and self confidence that comes with it. That is something no one can ever take from you

The Army Reserve is more like a part-time job that enables you to keep your civilian career while you continue to train near home and serve your country. Many professionals as well as college students are Soldiers in the Army Reserve. As a Soldier in the Army Reserve, you should expect to spend one weekend a month in training and attend a two-week Field Training Exercise (FTX) once a year. In times of war, Soldiers in the Army Reserve may be called up to Active Duty ("activation") as our country's needs require.

http://www.goarmy.com/reserve/benefits/money.html

I am providing a link on the GoArmy website for more information about the benefits the Army Reserve can offer you.

http://www.goarmy.com/reserve/benefits.html

Please let me know if you need more assistance.


Army Strong!
What that is saying is that yes, you will have time for the Reserve while in school. However, if you are Deployed, you are SOL school-wise. Sure they will continue to help pay, but if you are in a position like me (which you are, since its medic school) where it is a cohort, strictly-scheduled program, a "semester off" isn't an option.

What does this mean to me? It means I will be contacting a National Guard recruiter here soon. The National Guard is similar to the Army Reserve, except it is run by the state and is thus limited to being within the state. That said, some states have better National Guard programs than others, because it is all based on funding and location. I'm just fortunate to be in a good area for it.

My suggestion to you is either make it work with ROTC (which isn't always as easy as it sounds; again, not even an option for me given athletic training), get in with the National Guard, or find other less-stringent-commitment areas to serve in. CERT, SAR, volunteer fire, anything like that. Or just work a whole lot. Don't let your desire to serve fade away. If you really want the military experience, get yourself into a better position and make it worthwhile. In your case, finish school, or get to a real stopping point (not in the middle of a Medic program).

Now, once you have all of that figured out, where to serve. As mentioned, the Marine Corps does not have exclusive medical personnel, as they themselves are a branch of the Navy. That said, Navy Corpsmen is an option. For Air Force, being a PJ is the route, which is truly a feat to achieve, but I have only heard good things. Personally, if I was medically cleared for it, that would be my route. For Army, your 68 Whiskeys are the medics. When it comes to training, I can't say for certain, but I feel that it is reasonable to say you ought to expect to have to go through all BCT/IET and MOS training, despite your credentials.

68Ws operate at the AEMT (and maybe even some Medic skills too) level, but I believe they only qualify for the NREMT. I am unsure about other branches, but I have never heard of anyone being able to test for AEMT let alone Paramedic after military training.

Good luck!

Edit: About your last question relating to skills. I recently heard a statistics that the US military as a whole has not reported a single death related to heat illness. That means that someone somewhere is educated and is educating, on multiple levels. That there covers your heat illness, strokes, diabetes and other cardiovascular diseases (sickle cell), and anything else you can lineup with heat illness. I would not worry too much about skills fading while serving. Bring your texts on deployment if you are worried.
 

Aidan McArthur

Forum Probie
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If I recall, Navy Corpsmen and Army 68W's will be going, if they are not already, to the same 'A-School'. This means they receive the same training. Anyone who says Navy medics are better than Army medics or vice versa is wrong.

My advice to you is to go Army. It is extremely competitive to become a Navy Corpsman, especially if you want to be a green (a Corpsman FMF that is attached to a Marine unit). Greens see combat. Blues work in a hospital enviorment. You are also not guaranteed a rating when you join the Navy. You will be given a job based on availability and what is needed within the Navy. It is unlikely to become a Corpsman because it is an extremely popular rating to choose, and therefore less available.

In the Army, you can guarantee what MOS you get when you sign your contract. There is a good chance that you will be working in a hospital-like enviorment, but it's still good experience. The Army also has better benefits in general, and you rank up faster.

Both Army 68W and Navy Corpsman are enlisted only positons - you can't do them as an officer. Something to keep in mind.

This information is all based on what I have researched over the years. I am not in the military, so I could be wrong about some things, but I myself am planning on joining the Army with a 68W Contract and have done a ton of research into all the branches.

In my opinion, Army and Navy are the only ones worth considering for a medic position; Airforce is extremely competitive. Even more than Corpsmen. And PJ's training is compared to Navy SEAL training. Some think it's even harder. Coast Guard is a very small branch, so that in of itself allows them to be exclusive in general. They do have an EMT-like positon. It's basically first-aid work in a sick bay from what I have read. As another member said, Marines don't have medics. They use Corpsmen. Except maybe MARSOC. But even they use MARSOC cross trained Corpsmen (I think). If you really really want to be a Marine AND a medic (some people would understand that strong desire/calling) then go with the Corpsmen. If you just want to serve your country as a medic, go Army; you are guaranteed your MOS and you will have great benefits.

I am deciding to join the Army after I get EMT certified, which I am currently going to school for. AFAIK, if you go in certified you can choose to fasttrack your A-School, skipping the EMT training you will receive in the military. However, a Marine buddy of mine warned me against this as it will mess up your rank/pay or something? Not entirely sure, but basically since you are skipping weeks of training time, you will not be as high a rank as your peers when all is said and done... I think. I'm not quite clear on that to be honest.

Good luck to you.
 

CFal

Forum Captain
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If you join as a Medic with your EMT already you get enlisted as an E4 Specialist, you also skip the first seven weeks of AIT.
 

Grimes

Forum Asst. Chief
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If you join as a Medic with your EMT already you get enlisted as an E4 Specialist, you also skip the first seven weeks of AIT.
As mentioned by Aidan, I personally don't think this is the best option. Emergency response IS different in the military, no matter how you look at it. Yes, you qualify for your Basic at the end, but the "courses" were still different. The only analogy I can think of here is taking AP Statistics or Statistics in college. Either way, you get what you want, the credit, but the courses are certainly different and each have their pros and cons. I think it is safe to argue that EMT-B school may lean more towards Medical, while training to be a 68W or Corpsman leans more towards Trauma. As well, missing the first few weeks of AIT (if that really is the case) may save some time, sure, but will also put you at a disadvantage among your peers at first because you haven't a clue how emergency medicine is taught in the military setting. All of this is speculative, yes, but its what I'd be thinking if I were in that position.
 

CFal

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The first seven weeks is the exact same EMT basic curriculum, the Whiskey trauma training takes place starting week 8 on
 

Aidan McArthur

Forum Probie
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If you join as a Medic with your EMT already you get enlisted as an E4 Specialist, you also skip the first seven weeks of AIT.
Oh wow, that's interesting. You said that the medic training you receive in AIT is the same thing you will be taught as a civilian. Can you think of any reason to redo the training? Maybe they implement combat tactics into it for example? Or is it truly just the same thing you are taught as a civilian with the ultimate goal of getting you to pass the NREMT? If there is no point to redo the training fast tracking sounds like a great plan...
 

CFal

Forum Captain
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I can't think of a reason to not take the fast track if you are already an EMT, it's all the same thing. Once you start the Whiskey training they tell you to forget things you learned in the EMT portion and then teach you the way they do it in a combat environment. You need to be a NREMT though so they have to cover the stuff that you won't use as a 68W.
 

joshrunkle35

Forum Asst. Chief
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(Non-military guy here...take this with a grain of salt)

I can't think of any reason to do the fast track. Why not score well on material you already know, have the same time in as your peers (so they don't get promotions before you) and learn the military way of doing things, like using gear you'll be issued, etc? Why not spend that time exercising, cleaning, etc, with your peers so you can continue to perform well, on through the harder material, rather than being in a tough class while worrying about your physical fitness or passing an inspection of one sort or another. I know these should be way, way easier than basic, but I do believe you still have to do a few things outside of the classroom. Why not learn to do them while you're in the easy learning phase, rather than the hard one?
 

CFal

Forum Captain
431
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(Non-military guy here...take this with a grain of salt)

I can't think of any reason to do the fast track. Why not score well on material you already know, have the same time in as your peers (so they don't get promotions before you) and learn the military way of doing things, like using gear you'll be issued, etc? Why not spend that time exercising, cleaning, etc, with your peers so you can continue to perform well, on through the harder material, rather than being in a tough class while worrying about your physical fitness or passing an inspection of one sort or another. I know these should be way, way easier than basic, but I do believe you still have to do a few things outside of the classroom. Why not learn to do them while you're in the easy learning phase, rather than the hard one?
They won't, you go in as an E4 SPC when you go ACASP and fast track through the EMT portion. As for "learn the military way of doing things" that starts after week 7, and you already go through BCT before AIT so that should cover learning to be a soldier.
 

MackTheKnife

BSN, RN-BC, NREMT, EMT-P, TCRN
484
114
43
Well, Marines don't have medical personnel as those spots are all covered by navy personnel. Air force uses medics but pj training is long and I'm not sure on the availability of reserve slots.
Naval corpsmen are able to challenge the national registry for paramedic now I believe, but there is no promise that you will not end up as a dental assistant instead of a fleet marine corpsman. Army has medics but they are at intermediate level from what I have heard.

This is all just bard on what I have heard from various people in different branches.
I have to agree with boxer that if fire is you you should sit down and visualize your end goal and take the path that best serves that, also keep in mind that no career path in the military is guaranteed
Corpsmen can challenge NREMTP? Any further info?
 

MackTheKnife

BSN, RN-BC, NREMT, EMT-P, TCRN
484
114
43
I would do ROTC during college, become an officer, make way more money, and then try (no guarantee) to get into something where you oversee firefighters.

Or, finish college. Go back for two more years to PA school. Then join the military as a PA.

Then become a reservist.
Good advice.
 

MackTheKnife

BSN, RN-BC, NREMT, EMT-P, TCRN
484
114
43
If I recall, Navy Corpsmen and Army 68W's will be going, if they are not already, to the same 'A-School'. This means they receive the same training. Anyone who says Navy medics are better than Army medics or vice versa is wrong.

My advice to you is to go Army. It is extremely competitive to become a Navy Corpsman, especially if you want to be a green (a Corpsman FMF that is attached to a Marine unit). Greens see combat. Blues work in a hospital enviorment. You are also not guaranteed a rating when you join the Navy. You will be given a job based on availability and what is needed within the Navy. It is unlikely to become a Corpsman because it is an extremely popular rating to choose, and therefore less available.

In the Army, you can guarantee what MOS you get when you sign your contract. There is a good chance that you will be working in a hospital-like enviorment, but it's still good experience. The Army also has better benefits in general, and you rank up faster.

Both Army 68W and Navy Corpsman are enlisted only positons - you can't do them as an officer. Something to keep in mind.

This information is all based on what I have researched over the years. I am not in the military, so I could be wrong about some things, but I myself am planning on joining the Army with a 68W Contract and have done a ton of research into all the branches.

In my opinion, Army and Navy are the only ones worth considering for a medic position; Airforce is extremely competitive. Even more than Corpsmen. And PJ's training is compared to Navy SEAL training. Some think it's even harder. Coast Guard is a very small branch, so that in of itself allows them to be exclusive in general. They do have an EMT-like positon. It's basically first-aid work in a sick bay from what I have read. As another member said, Marines don't have medics. They use Corpsmen. Except maybe MARSOC. But even they use MARSOC cross trained Corpsmen (I think). If you really really want to be a Marine AND a medic (some people would understand that strong desire/calling) then go with the Corpsmen. If you just want to serve your country as a medic, go Army; you are guaranteed your MOS and you will have great benefits.

I am deciding to join the Army after I get EMT certified, which I am currently going to school for. AFAIK, if you go in certified you can choose to fasttrack your A-School, skipping the EMT training you will receive in the military. However, a Marine buddy of mine warned me against this as it will mess up your rank/pay or something? Not entirely sure, but basically since you are skipping weeks of training time, you will not be as high a rank as your peers when all is said and done... I think. I'm not quite clear on that to be honest.

Good luck to you.
Not true. You can go into the Navy with a guaranteed school if your ASVAB test scores are high enough and you agree to OBLISERV.
 

MackTheKnife

BSN, RN-BC, NREMT, EMT-P, TCRN
484
114
43
Lots of good advice. Some accurate, some not. MARSOC uses Amphib Recon Corpsmen. The pipeline is 52 weeks +. If you go Reserves, in any branch, you could get called to active duty. And as one person said, you're SOL with school. National Guard would be better, but they can get called up. Think OIF and OEF.
The Navy is still light years BEHIND on EMS. Most of the 3 week NREMT courses they had have been shut down. Air Force or Army are relatively better choices. But they ARE NOT anything like civilian EMS.
Best bet for you is to finish what you started. Get your PM, get some experience, and think about reserves after a few years.
 

Aidan McArthur

Forum Probie
19
4
3
Not true. You can go into the Navy with a guaranteed school if your ASVAB test scores are high enough and you agree to OBLISERV.
Can you elaborate or link me to a source? Every recruiter I have talked to has told me that I am not guaranteed a rating. I have also been told that my ASVAB scores are very high. What is OBLISERV? Can't find any information on it.
 
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