O2 tank size naming convention?

dacrowley

Forum Probie
11
0
0
How are tank's named? There seems to be no logic to the letters at they relate to tank sizes or capacity. Am I missing something or are the tanks just named completely arbitrarily? :wacko:
 

NomadicMedic

EMS Edumacator
10,662
5,046
113
A little google fu found this...

Two sets of names are used to differentiate between oxygen cylinder sizes. The original set uses an alphabetical system, starting with A for the smallest size and E for the largest portable size. The new naming system begins with the letter “M,” for “medical,” followed by a number that signifies the amount of cubic feet of oxygen in that can be compressed into the cylinder. So the original B cylinder is now often referred to as an M-6 cylinder because it can hold 6 cubic feet of oxygen.

The standard "house bag" o2 cylinder is the D or Jumbo D. We carry a composite cylinder thats a bit smaller than a regular aluminum D. Most hospital gurneys and wheelchairs with oxygen have an E tank on them and the ambulance on board oxygen is usually an H. (colloquial: the H bomb)

Hope that helps.

 

Aidey

Forum Deputy Chiefette
4,800
11
38
A is the smallest, and it goes up from there.
 

abckidsmom

Dances with Patients
3,380
5
36
A little google fu found this...

Two sets of names are used to differentiate between oxygen cylinder sizes. The original set uses an alphabetical system, starting with A for the smallest size and E for the largest portable size. The new naming system begins with the letter “M,” for “medical,” followed by a number that signifies the amount of cubic feet of oxygen in that can be compressed into the cylinder. So the original B cylinder is now often referred to as an M-6 cylinder because it can hold 6 cubic feet of oxygen.

The standard "house bag" o2 cylinder is the D or Jumbo D. We carry a composite cylinder thats a bit smaller than a regular aluminum D. Most hospital gurneys and wheelchairs with oxygen have an E tank on them and the ambulance on board oxygen is usually an H. (colloquial: the H bomb)

Hope that helps.

This here is evidence of your dorkdom.

We carry Hs. Ugh.
 

DesertMedic66

Forum Troll
10,229
2,597
113
This here is evidence of your dorkdom.

We carry Hs. Ugh.
We carry Hs as well. I don't have a problem with them because I don't have to replace them....
 

dacrowley

Forum Probie
11
0
0
A little google fu found this...

Two sets of names are used to differentiate between oxygen cylinder sizes. The original set uses an alphabetical system, starting with A for the smallest size and E for the largest portable size. The new naming system begins with the letter “M,” for “medical,” followed by a number that signifies the amount of cubic feet of oxygen in that can be compressed into the cylinder. So the original B cylinder is now often referred to as an M-6 cylinder because it can hold 6 cubic feet of oxygen.
Thanks much. The new naming convention used in conjunction with the old was throwing me off. I wasn't aware there was a new one until now.
 

Tigger

Dodges Pucks
Community Leader
6,846
1,968
113
This here is evidence of your dorkdom.

We carry Hs. Ugh.
We carry them them two but good luck getting me to use them with three portables on the truck... Maybe if I didn't have to swap them.
 

mrg86

Forum Crew Member
60
0
6
I actually think the full standup tanks are M tanks not H tanks.


The M and H can look alike but the H is quite a bit larger (and heavier). My department uses both, the M on the BLS unit and the H on the medic rig.
 

BLS Systems Limited

Verified Vendor
58
0
0
Interesting that the "new" system uses M for Medical and then a number for size in cubic feet...and the flowmeters are measured in liters per minute. So to answer your question, there isn't really a logic to the sizing.

Whenever I discuss cylinder life with colleagues, my basic advice is to read the label that should come with the cylinder after every fill. After being locked in a plane for 30+ hours with combinations of M, D, Super D, Jumbo D, M-22...I just read the label and try not to waste anything.
 
Top