NRAEMT

Colt45

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I took my National Registry test on Saturday and just found out my result (don't ever test on a weekend if you want to enjoy it). I failed and got near passing in every section and below passing in trauma. Out of 10 people in my class I got the highest grade and put probably 4X the effort into reading and using Emstesting.com to quiz myself. I have over 7000 questions on that website alone and overall standing is exceptional on the site.
Ive also spend 25 hours on emtprep.com and have an average of 80% on there as well.

This test was hard. I never once felt like I had no clue what they wer asking, but some questions were worded very tricky. I have this info down packed in my mind and feel pretty bad about myself failing, I'm kind of a perfectionist. Does anyone have any pointers besides the obvious "don't read into it to much", or cn share their experiences with the NRAEMT test they took and how they felt? Thanks in advance I really want to pass this next time and am nervous as heck about it.
 
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Colt45

Colt45

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Yeah its Multiple choice. 2 right answers usually. Pick the best one. Had to take it twice it was a hard test.
 

gcosta

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I'm a bit older then most going for this. but I took my EMT training cert like 20 years ago and passed the class just never passed the state test. Now I have decided to try again. not taking my class until April but just trying to get all the info I can. Thanks
 
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Colt45

Colt45

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Okay so advanced is a higher level of certification than basic. I assume you have to do Basic again, and in that case after your class you schedule with Pearson view to take your national registry if you dont have a state test. Its It's a CAB test that gives you Questions in areas it thinks your weak in and csn range from 70 to 150 or something. Dont quote me on the max range. But if it feels your sufficient at entry level by 70 it will shut you off, and vice versa. If there is no way you can pass it will shut you off too. The computer has to be 95% confident of your level pass or fail. There are different areas it tests you on, and you can find more information about that, just read through a lot of these threads it will inform you. But don't fret to much on the nitty gritty right now just get into your pass and complete it. Your teachers should help you along with the NREMT.
 

gcosta

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Alright cool! Thanks! So what's the difference between basic and advanced? It must be a bridging point between emt and medic.
 
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Colt45

Colt45

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Basic is strictly BLS with few interventions in their scope. Advanced you learn to read cardiac rhythms start IV's and put in supraglottic airways in unresponsive patients. And there is a list of drugs youre now able to administer. It's about 3/4 of medic drugs.
 

VentMonkey

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Basic is strictly BLS with few interventions in their scope. Advanced you learn to read cardiac rhythms start IV's and put in supraglottic airways in unresponsive patients. And there is a list of drugs youre now able to administer. It's about 3/4 of medic drugs.
Op, where is it that you work?

While I don't know much about AEMT, or the exam, what I do know is shamefully my state (CA) doesn't recognize it.

In my opinion it would work perfectly in a fire-based system with short ETA's the the local ED, and whom don't really do complete levell of ALS to begin with in the first place.

It also seems more cost-effective for these fire services to do so. And by fire services, I mean just about every department the Southern California region.
 

NomadicMedic

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Op, where is it that you work?

While I don't know much about AEMT, or the exam, what I do know is shamefully my state (CA) doesn't recognize it.

In my opinion it would work perfectly in a fire-based system with short ETA's the the local ED, and whom don't really do complete levell of ALS to begin with in the first place.

It also seems more cost-effective for these fire services to do so. And by fire services, I mean just about every department the Southern California region.

You seem like a pretty smart guy. Why would you advocate for paramedic level skills without the education? The only role an AEMT should serve is as a medics partner. That's a perfect fit. An uptrained partner to assist with the skills.
 

VentMonkey

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You bring up an excellent point. I think my only thing is that they provide this level of service now anyhow, yet still slap "paramedic" on the side of just about every apparatus they can get their hands on.

In my mind, a solid basic can be sufficient and compliment a good paramedic. They would be a true technician.

Again, while I may not fully comprehend what it is that goes into the AEMT curriculum it would appear to me that most, if not all of these departments back home function at this level anyway, so perhaps by distinguishing themselves as such..maybe, just maaaybe the public would be slightly better informed of the different levels of prehospital provider.

Again, you do bring up a solid point up about giving them paramedic level skills, so I ask, what exactly is it that would set the two skill sets apart in your opinion?
 

EpiEMS

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Basic is strictly BLS with few interventions in their scope. Advanced you learn to read cardiac rhythms start IV's and put in supraglottic airways in unresponsive patients. And there is a list of drugs youre now able to administer. It's about 3/4 of medic drugs.

This description includes what may be a particular state or states' AEMT scope of practice, and differs markedly from national scope. National scope *does not* give anything near 3/4 (75%) of drugs that are standard for paramedics -- it has 7, which are nitrous oxide, epinephrine, nitroglycerin, glucagon, D50, and albuterol (plus the EMT-administered ASA and oral glucose in national scope). And it doesn't have cardiac rhythm monitoring in there, either.

The national scope of practice model is this document: National Scope of Practice Model (2007)

You seem like a pretty smart guy. Why would you advocate for paramedic level skills without the education? The only role an AEMT should serve is as a medics partner. That's a perfect fit. An uptrained partner to assist with the skills.

Or perhaps as the baseline for an emergency response provider in the 911 system, like Canada's PCP ;)
 

VentMonkey

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This description includes what may be a particular state or states' AEMT scope of practice, and differs markedly from national scope. National scope *does not* give anything near 3/4 (75%) of drugs that are standard for paramedics -- it has 7, which are nitrous oxide, epinephrine, nitroglycerin, glucagon, D50, and albuterol (plus the EMT-administered ASA and oral glucose in national scope). And it doesn't have cardiac rhythm monitoring in there, either.

The national scope of practice model is this document: National Scope of Practice Model (2007)



Or perhaps as the baseline for an emergency response provider in the 911 system, like Canada's PCP ;)
Thanks for the link, Epi. To further elaborate, in the systems where I began it just seemed more fitting to have them start this so called "intermediate" level of care, followed by a single-role paramedic ambulance to augment the response and ask the fire personnel/ AEMT to ride along and act as an extra set of hands if needed. Sorta like the Las Vegas model, though I do realize their FD's are pretty much all ALS, and doesn't exactly work this way.

Again, it was simply food for thought, will it happen? Pffth, probably not in my lifetime what with all the politics, and bureaucrats, but hey I'm always open to others input and points of view.
 

Jim37F

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This description includes what may be a particular state or states' AEMT scope of practice, and differs markedly from national scope. National scope *does not* give anything near 3/4 (75%) of drugs that are standard for paramedics -- it has 7, which are nitrous oxide, epinephrine, nitroglycerin, glucagon, D50, and albuterol (plus the EMT-administered ASA and oral glucose in national scope). And it doesn't have cardiac rhythm monitoring in there, either.

The national scope of practice model is this document: National Scope of Practice Model (2007)



Or perhaps as the baseline for an emergency response provider in the 911 system, like Canada's PCP ;)
Man, if I could go through a whole AEMT curriculum, and have the only thing allowed above my current BLS scope being Nitrous (or something more than a cold pack if nothing else), and Zofran ODT tablets, everything else being the exact same, I'd jump at that chance
 
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Colt45

Colt45

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Yeah the scope here in Utah is much bigger drug wise for advanced that what you said. We can administer much more than what was described as above. We actually run Ambo's out here with AEMT as the highest level Unless we need paramedic intervention we can call for it.
 

twistedMP

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Yeah the scope here in Utah is much bigger drug wise for advanced that what you said. We can administer much more than what was described as above. We actually run Ambo's out here with AEMT as the highest level Unless we need paramedic intervention we can call for it.
Colt We've got the same thing in Georgia we call them BLS trucks either a basic and advanced or 2 advanced
 

gcosta

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Has anyone used EMTQuiz.com? I am studying for the B-EMT exam in May. Just wondering if it's worth it. The site claims that 98% of people that use this practice site pass the NREMT.
 

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