Nervous about EMT Practical

Mercenary480

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Hi, I recently passed my EMT course in CT and am set to take my practical on friday.

I'm currently studying my *** out of the skill sheets but I'm just wondering besides the basic anagrams(DCAP-BTLS, SAMPLE, OPQRST, AVPU, and ABC's) are there any ones out there that you guys know to help me remember everything on the sheets for Medical and Trauma...

PS) My teacher was able to find out what stations we will have, Medical, Trauma, CPR/AED, KED, BVM, and Long Bone Splinting(possible traction splint) and I'm pretty sure I got the other 4 down, but any advice on memorization techniques incase I blank under pressure would be great... Thanks in advanced


Edit: Another question is, if I fail what are the rules about retaking the practical before I have to retake the class.
 
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Trayos

Forum Lieutenant
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If its going to be practicals, I would suggest hands-on practice. Are any of your classmates willing to do hands-on scenarios out of the text/online before the practical?
 

Linuss

Forum Chief
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The thing with the medical / trauma assessments is that it's pure brute memorization on the steps through the station.


Heck, mine was 2 months ago and I still have most of it in my head.


I would say "Don't be worried" but that won't help you. Just keep doing what you're doing with the memorization, and you'll be fine, I promise. You'll look back after you get your patch and think about how simple this all was.
 

Dominion

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Too bad you didn't get bleeding control, that skill station is so short now. Takes longer to explain the rules than doing the station.
 

mct601

RN/NRP
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Bleeding/shock was too short.


KED can be an *** depending on how anal your instructors are. Just KNOW your paramaters for failure i.e. not giving oxygen, not checking for PMS after applying straps, etc. The only real way to pass these stations efficiently is to know them through practice.
 

medicRob

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You could just stand there and wave your arms in the air, when the proctor asks what you are doing, say "Landing the bird, they will take it over from here! They said dont touch anything til they get a medic on scene".

Just kidding. I remember my skill was trauma assessment with application of either a Thomas Half Ring or a Sager (I got to choose). They want to see first and foremost that you check for scene safety and take BSI Precautions, perform your assessments including your skill, then facilitate the continuation of care for your patient. Those skills sheets will safe your life. Study them religiously! The little things are what get most people.

For instance, in TN since our entry level for ambulance is EMT-IV (Intravenous Therapy, not EMT-4), we have a little bit more of an expanded skills examination covering things like Combi/PTL airways, and Intravenous access. One of the biggest things on the IV practical was checking bag clarity. I am quite surprised at how many individuals do not check the bag for clarity. Always remember the little things!
 

8jimi8

CFRN
1,792
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look at the bottom of your skill sheets.

those are the golden moments you cannot miss or mess up. Everything else is merely points.

you can do this, practice it over and over until you don't miss a line on the sheet and you finish in under the time allotted.
 

LucidResq

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I wrote down all of the steps, avoiding looking at the actual sheet as much as possible, until I could write them down perfectly without peeking at all.

I played victim for other classes practicals and evaluated them mentally as they went along.

Get in the habit of verbalizing everything and do so in your actual test. Even the stuff you don't have to verbalize. It helps you keep yourself on track.
 

medicRob

Forum Deputy Chief
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I played victim for other classes practicals and evaluated them mentally as they went along.

This right here is probably the best thing you could've done to prepare for the practical. I always encourage people to volunteer to play the patient for the practical exam in order for them to get an idea of how thinks are carried out during this exam.
 

Fox

Forum Crew Member
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Hi, I recently passed my EMT course in CT and am set to take my practical on friday.

I'm currently studying my *** out of the skill sheets but I'm just wondering besides the basic anagrams(DCAP-BTLS, SAMPLE, OPQRST, AVPU, and ABC's) are there any ones out there that you guys know to help me remember everything on the sheets for Medical and Trauma...

PS) My teacher was able to find out what stations we will have, Medical, Trauma, CPR/AED, KED, BVM, and Long Bone Splinting(possible traction splint) and I'm pretty sure I got the other 4 down, but any advice on memorization techniques incase I blank under pressure would be great... Thanks in advanced


Edit: Another question is, if I fail what are the rules about retaking the practical before I have to retake the class.

Tell them everything you're doing.

High flow oxygen ONLY for practicals. Stay calm, breathe. You got through your medical/trauma assessment check offs, you can do this to.

CONSIDER ALS!

Don't forget to do an ongoing assessment at the end of the scenario. Don't be afraid to end the scenario either.

Ask for every info you need. If you don't need an IV, but you might, inform them that you're starting an IV TKO. Etc. Just tell them EVERYTHING you do. If you don't say it, it doesn't count.

Goodluck! You can do it. :D
 
OP
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Mercenary480

Forum Ride Along
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Thanks for the support everyone, Im doing everything I can to memorize the sheets...

I like Lucid's idea of trying to rewrite the sheet without looking at the sheet so I'm goin to spend the next few days doing that...

I know I need to verbalize everything and I practiced doing that in class, that will be easy for me anyway because dead silence kills me lol. So the trick is just memorizing everything
 

Fox

Forum Crew Member
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Do not memorize! They know when you're just spitting out our sheets and they frown on that.

Just go in, make sure the scene is safe, get your NOI, BSI, MOI. Then things will fall in place. While you're doing your ABCs. If they're talking coherently and clearly, there is your LOC and Airway knocked out in one. Etc.

Just do your assessment, treat them, and don't forget simple things like ALS, medical control, contraindications. It's really easy. If you memorize a skill sheet you will miss something or put way too much effort into something.

One of my friends is married to a preceptor and he told me that they can tell when a student knows their stuff or when they are memorizing it.

You've made it this far in class, you've nailed your check off and your assessments, you've got this. It's easy and simple! You can do it, don't stress yourself out!
 
OP
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Mercenary480

Forum Ride Along
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Its one of the best things I got, I know my stuff but I'm just afraid with someone staring over my shoulder I'll forget... So I'm gunna try to memorize everything
 

joeshmoe

Forum Lieutenant
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Do not memorize! They know when you're just spitting out our sheets and they frown on that.

Just go in, make sure the scene is safe, get your NOI, BSI, MOI. Then things will fall in place. While you're doing your ABCs. If they're talking coherently and clearly, there is your LOC and Airway knocked out in one. Etc.

Just do your assessment, treat them, and don't forget simple things like ALS, medical control, contraindications. It's really easy. If you memorize a skill sheet you will miss something or put way too much effort into something.

One of my friends is married to a preceptor and he told me that they can tell when a student knows their stuff or when they are memorizing it.

I would still memorize the skill sheet. All it takes is to not verbalize something like your patient is a high priority for immediate transport or some other thing and you fail the station.
Regardless of what the person testing you thinks, if you hit everything on the sheet your supposed to and dont do anything that is a critical fail, you pass.
It's easier to make sure you havent forgotten something if you have memorized the sheet and systematically go down it in your mind rather than doing an assessment like you would in real life.
 

8jimi8

CFRN
1,792
9
38
I would still memorize the skill sheet. All it takes is to not verbalize something like your patient is a high priority for immediate transport or some other thing and you fail the station.
Regardless of what the person testing you thinks, if you hit everything on the sheet your supposed to and dont do anything that is a critical fail, you pass.
It's easier to make sure you havent forgotten something if you have memorized the sheet and systematically go down it in your mind rather than doing an assessment like you would in real life.

quoted in agreement
 

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