My and my mom's first call...

c-spine

Forum Lieutenant
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My mom's a first responder, and I am an EMT-B. I don't have my license yet, however. We're both members of our local First Responder group (though I am unable to respond til my license arrives)

We were the on-site medical staff (as 'free-lance' first responder/emt) at a local horse event. We were watching the show when paged out to a man who fell off a roof, possible neck fracture.

I had driven us to the horse event, so we got into my car and proceeded to the call. My mom was absolutely freaked out by the time we got to the scene.

We were taken by another guy's truck back to the roof and found the patient lying in the doorstep (it was elevated abuot a foot maybe? So his knees were bent over the edge...like he would have been sitting up... make sense?) My mom was freaked and forgot everything.

I suggested she take c-spine but she ignored me to dig in her bag to find "something." So I talked to the patient, got his SAMPLE history, checked out his neck, and proceeded with the initial assessment. My mom was so damn concerned about his snapped ankle. (severely dislocated, angulated...looked cool though). She had me take vitals and then had me elevate his leg. Didn't check CMS either.

Ambulance got on scene about 10 mins later, and the lead guy of our FR group was there as well...I'm not sure what he thought, seeing me there. :unsure: Hopefully he won't be too ticked off...

But anyway; do you guys have any ideas (besides practice) so I can help my mom to chill out on these calls? She gets way too worked up, and in turn, forgets things, and ignores my requests. Or do you think that since she's still new at this, that it'll go away with time?
 

Chimpie

Site Administrator
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Practice, practice, practice. Run her through a million scenarios. Make her the first on scene, getting PT info, and also work scenarios working as a team with her. Make sure she understands MOI. That way she knows that a neck/back injury is more important than an ankle one. And when you can't do actual scenarios, run through verbal drills.
 

Ridryder911

EMS Guru
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The only way to respond and act calmly is by reacting on a call... and that comes through practicing, practicing, and running several hundred calls. One has to rehearse so much it is an instinct to perform, and talk one self through... (I suggest talking quietly...LOL)

It's great your mom has you to help her, and be upbeat on constructive criticism..

r/r 911
 

disassociative

Forum Captain
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My EMT instructor gave me some great advice.

He said, "When you get on the scene; Pretend you don't know how to
do anything other than the basic ABC; Cspine comes second; everything
else is not important until A-B-C-Spine; I don't care if his leg is twisted one
way and his body is going the other.. Forget what you see on ER; A-B-C-Spine.
You can worry abt the rest when the team gets there."
 

Guardian

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I would suggest that you not respond to calls with your mom. I think one should only respond to calls with his/her EMS partner and not family members. Was it a problem in this case, probably not but I still think it's a bad idea. Remember the phrase "Its not my emergency" and make sure your mom understands this concept. What you saw was mild compared to what you're going to see on future calls. If your not familiar with the "It's not my emergency" concept, then let me explain it to you. It starts when you show up on scene and see something really bad. What you do at this point is stop, take a breath, and say to yourself "damn, thats got to suck, i'm glad its not my emergency" At this point you can continue with a clear mind because there is nothing to worry about. It might sound kind of dumb, but after your mother gets the hang of it, she will do a lot better on stressful calls.
 

Jon

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First step when you hit an "oh crap" call is to take a deep breath, and remember it is the PATIENT's emergency, not YOUR emergency.

Practice is good. If I "read between the lines" you guys are part of a small QRS service in a rural area... see if she can do a ride-a-long with a busy ambulance company.
 

c-spine

Forum Lieutenant
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My mom is my partner when I'm there. (we both belong to the F.R. group). She lives out in the boonies and it's not worth driving 9 miles to town (about 15 mins) to meet up with someone else and then go to the scene. So we're partners when I'm there; but I agree. She just needs to calm down and practice more, (just like I need to do with medical pts)

but thanks for the advice all, I'll pass it along!

:)
 

Margaritaville

Forum Lieutenant
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mom

Take her out back and beat her with a Big Damn Stick. (just a thought)

She needs rookie time with a "qualified" preceptor - ASAP!

Unfortunately, your not the person who should be teaching her.

Good luck and feel free to show her this post!
 

c-spine

Forum Lieutenant
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Margaritaville said:
Take her out back and beat her with a Big Damn Stick. (just a thought)

She needs rookie time with a "qualified" preceptor - ASAP!

Unfortunately, your not the person who should be teaching her.

Good luck and feel free to show her this post!

LOL! So kind and caring you are... :p She just needs some practice, as do I... but I'm a little more grounded and less nervous than she is. ^_^ -mumbles something about "big damn stick" and eyes Margaritaville warily-
 

fm_emt

Useless without caffeine
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Yeah, dude.. you can't club MOM with the cluebat! She'll bust out with one of those magical shoes that comes flying around the corner and clobbers you in the back of the head.

Then some other agency will have to respond and find c-spine and her mom both knocked out from the liberal cluebat application to each other. ;-)

I dunno, c-spine.. just remind her to remember the basics. That might help out a bit. Take a deep breath and remember the basics!
 

Stevo

Forum Asst. Chief
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my mom raised 3 boys

if it wasn't an aterial bleed, or exposed bone we were told to bleed outside....

methinks she would have made a better cop though

she could hit any moving target with her shoe


~S~
 

gradygirl

TROUBLE
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Maybe until she calms down she should gather information. That's what we always stick our green or nervous responders with, the clipboard, the runform, and a pen. No touchy until everyone is well settled.

As for the whole not listening to you thing, ask her very kindly, but very sternly to calm down and listen to what you have to say. She's your mom and you need to respect that/her, but she needs to show you the same respect. The whole family dynamic thing kinda goes out the window on scene.
 

Jon

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c-spine said:
LOL! So kind and caring you are... :p She just needs some practice, as do I... but I'm a little more grounded and less nervous than she is. ^_^ -mumbles something about "big damn stick" and eyes Margaritaville warily-
Actually, Margaritiaville has a point. I had this discussion on a standby today with some folks from the other side of the county... they made a comment, in jest, about my title of "Primary EMT" They have no precepting program... you graduate EMT school, and you could easily be riding the "hot seat" on the ambulance or QRS the next day.... It was somewhat suprising.

Precepting time, and/or ride time with a reasonably busy sqaud might be a good idea.
 

c-spine

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I didn't mean any offense by my comment, Margaritaville. :)
 
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