Man Dies Outside of ER Entrance

ffemt8978

Forum Vice-Principal
Community Leader
9,944
764
113

JPINFV

Gadfly
12,681
196
63
Relevant quote from the Hospital...

"We advised the officer immediately to call 911 because EMS have the mobile equipment to respond to a car accident," Leach said in the statement.

Leach said that along with calling 911, hospital staff immediately began mobilizing and sent a paramedic and two first responders to the scene right away.

The other stories I've read on this say that the two first responders were both RNs.

So, why are the police lying about the hospital not sending resources?
 

Aidey

Forum Deputy Chiefette
4,800
11
38
Not the first time or the last time. Most, if not all of the hospitals I've worked with have similar policies.

Frankly, it sounds like the guy was dead and the hospital staff dragging him inside wouldn't have changed a darn thing.

I also like that the hospital admin had the balls to step up and say that he should have called 911. Chances are he still would have died, but if you are that close to death you should not be driving.
 

lex

Forum Crew Member
38
0
0
Sounds eerily familliar to a case that was all over the Canadian air waves about two years ago.

Tried to find some articles to post links but didn't have any luck hunting them down. A man was found outside of City Hopsital in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan a few minutes before the ER opened for the day. Despite staff being inside, and a passer by being able to get inside to alert staff of the patient staff still elected to call 911 and wait for the ambulance. They then refused to admit that ambulance to the ER as they were still not open for a few more minutes. I respect that the hospitals have policies but something about these situations just does not seem right.
 

Lady_EMT

Forum Lieutenant
116
0
0
I once had a guy who fell in the parking lot of the hospital and hurt his hand. I'm talking minor laceration. There was a decent bit of blood, as I believe the man was on Coumadin (this call was about 3 years ago, when I was first in my EMT class). He was with a nurse, who was assisting him to his car when he fell. But they couldn't just turn and walk 100 feet to the ER, they had to call the ambulance to come, pick him up, and drive across the parking lot.

Now, did this accident actually happen in the parking lot, or on the road leading to the parking lot? There's a pretty big difference. From the sounds of it, the pt didn't need extrication, since the PD instantly initiated CPR. There are a lot of "wtf?'s" in this article.

TL;DR:
There's gonna be a looooot of paperwork.
 

Icenine

Forum Crew Member
77
1
0
Why can't the ED staff go outside the doors?

The only thing I can see is the lack of ability to immobilize.
 

Senorsquishie

Forum Ride Along
3
0
0
A similar incident happened at a hospital in my area, the difference is that the woman was admitted and then left the ED on her own accord. She never made it off hospital grounds. I wonder what safe gaurds hospitals have against these types of situations?
 

Flight-LP

Forum Deputy Chief
1,547
16
38
Why can't the ED staff go outside the doors?

The only thing I can see is the lack of ability to immobilize.

Because they have an obligation to their patients inside the ER. The hospital did eventually send some assistance, probably once available staff was located. This gentleman didn't use sound judgement and made a personal choice to drive himself. How can another be held liable for his personal desicion? It is reasonable for one to call 911 with a complaint of chest pain. It also reasonable that a mans wife would be by his side and perhaps drive him to the ER if that decision is made.

Sorry, thumbs down to this guys thought process.
 

TransportJockey

Forum Chief
8,621
1,672
113
The hospital I worked at had the same policy. Makes sense to me.
 

foxfire

Forum Asst. Chief
608
1
0
Something is not adding up here. Family says that the man had said he was feeling ill. And had been coughing a lot.
And then the hospital spokesperson says the pt was complaining of chest pain.
Maybe I am missing something.:unsure:
 

Linuss

Forum Chief
8,264
32
48
Something is not adding up here. Family says that the man had said he was feeling ill. And had been coughing a lot.
And then the hospital spokesperson says the pt was complaining of chest pain.
Maybe I am missing something.:unsure:

Ill feelings and caughing can be indications of an MI.



At the same time, media sucks and often doesn't get things right, so take what ANY journalist says in a story as bullcrap.
 

LucidResq

Forum Deputy Chief
2,031
3
0
Had a guy call 911, tell them he was in front of the ED doors, was going to shoot himself in the head and wanted to be an organ donor. The line disconnected. Security was immediately notified - and they confirmed what had just happened.

PD was en route of course but no ambulance was ever started. They just took him in.

That's the only similar circumstance I can think of.
 

HotelCo

Forum Deputy Chief
2,198
4
38
One of the smaller hospital has a 150 foot rule. If they're within 150 yards of a door to the hospital, ER staff can go and assist. With the exception being the patient still has to be on hospital property. Otherwise, they're required to call 911.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Veneficus

Forum Chief
7,301
8
0
In every hospital I have been affiliated with both in the states and in europe, we went/go outside all the time. Especially when the homeboy ambulance service was making deliveries.

(That is when a group of people usually engaged in criminal activity pushes a wounded/ill comrade out of the still moving vehicle in front of the ED so they don't have to stop and appear on security camera or answer questions. Especially when the local cops have a permanant posting in the ED.)

In the states some of the local EMS agencies even let us borrow some equipment in order to help.

I am of the mind of giving the hospital the benefit of the doubt on this one because the story seems inconsistent and poorly written to have all the facts.

I would also like to mention in some larger hospital complexes "the parking lot" can be blocks away. You cannot send ED staff on scavenger hunts all over the grounds.
 

HotelCo

Forum Deputy Chief
2,198
4
38
One of the smaller hospital has a 150 foot rule. If they're within 150 yards of a door to the hospital, ER staff can go and assist. With the exception being the patient still has to be on hospital property. Otherwise, they're required to call 911.

Just to clarify I was talking about yards, not feet.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Martyn

Forum Asst. Chief
612
52
28
Something is not adding up here. Family says that the man had said he was feeling ill. And had been coughing a lot.
And then the hospital spokesperson says the pt was complaining of chest pain.
Maybe I am missing something.:unsure:

Yeah, CHF?
 

bigbaldguy

Former medic seven years 911 service in houston
4,043
41
48
Some hospital complexes are so large and sprawling it makes sense that there would have to be some kind of limit on how far the ED staff can go. That said it does seem that if two police officers run into an ED and say theres someone who needs help outside that help should be sent (assuming that it can be spared of course)It will be very interesting to see just what details come out about this situation in the next few weeks.
 

bstone

Forum Deputy Chief
2,066
1
0
So, why are the police lying about the hospital not sending resources?

Because cops lie. Not shocking or groundbreaking at all.
 

DrParasite

The fire extinguisher is not just for show
5,407
1,519
113
Not the first time or the last time. Most, if not all of the hospitals I've worked with have similar policies.
damn, you beat me to it.
Frankly, it sounds like the guy was dead and the hospital staff dragging him inside wouldn't have changed a darn thing.
ehh, a witnessed arrest, right out side the ER? would have been better than CPR while waiting 10 minutes for an ambulance
A man was found outside of City Hopsital in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan a few minutes before the ER opened for the day
damn your ER aren't open 24/7? that sucks.
In every hospital I have been affiliated with both in the states and in europe, we went/go outside all the time. Especially when the homeboy ambulance service was making deliveries.
seriously? your doctors and nurses ran outside and treated people in the parking lots? most hospitals I am familiar with won't let the ER treat anyone outside of the ER. if someone falls in the parking lot, they will call 911, and usually have security meet the person outside (esp if on hospital property, so security can fill out a report). more often than not, security would escort the fall victim to the hospital, maybe in a wheelchair. but never a hospital stretcher with a doctor and nurse ready to treat the unconscious person.
I am of the mind of giving the hospital the benefit of the doubt on this one because the story seems inconsistent and poorly written to have all the facts.
I am not. most hospital I know of won't help you out of fear of liability of the doctor working outside the ER. I am sure the hospital is doing spin control to counter the negative PR that this event is gonna have.
 
OP
ffemt8978

ffemt8978

Forum Vice-Principal
Community Leader
9,944
764
113
I am sure the hospital is doing spin control to counter the negative PR that this event is gonna have.
I think all three sides are doing some spin control.
 

Top