Looking for resources for new EMTs

EMTrook

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Hello All,

I've seen a number of books, resources for people preparing for NREMT. As someone who has been newly certified (passed NREMT) this book was recommended as a good resource but it is expensive and published in 1996 - The 60-Second EMT: Rapid BLS/ALS Assessment, Diagnosis & Triage. Has any one read this book? Is it still relevant to latest research/info. I don't mind paying for it, if it still relevant.

I do have my textbook "Emergency Care 13th Edition" by Daniel Limmer and Michael F. O'Keef. Again a good resource, but looking to build a library of the latest most helpful resources. Should be mostly for the new EMT-B (post certification) but ok if it includes advance concepts that would be good as well.

Maybe you have other reading resources you can recommend? I know there are a ton of resources on the web, but am also looking for the best most current books to have as resources. If you have a favorite website or individual you follow online Id love to see that as well.

Thank you in advance!
 

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EMTrook

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I probably should have named this post "Looking for resources for new EMT's" - sorry for any confusion. Could not figure how to delete or edit the post. Thanks again!
 

ffemt8978

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I probably should have named this post "Looking for resources for new EMT's" - sorry for any confusion. Could not figure how to delete or edit the post. Thanks again!
Changed.
 

berkeman

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My Mentor (a paramedic) gave me his copy of that book when I first got my EMT license (15 years ago). It's got nice concise summaries and lots of useful tips for working on Pts. It also has ALS assessment and Tx information, but it all fits together pretty well, even at the EMT level. Some of the protocols have changed a little bit (like spine immobilization -- check your local EMS protocols for that). Congrats on getting your EMT!
 
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EMTrook

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My Mentor (a paramedic) gave me his copy of that book when I first got my EMT license (15 years ago). It's got nice concise summaries and lots of useful tips for working on Pts. It also has ALS assessment and Tx information, but it all fits together pretty well, even at the EMT level. Some of the protocols have changed a little bit (like spine immobilization -- check your local EMS protocols for that). Congrats on getting your EMT!
Thank You - this is helpful!
 
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EMTrook

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Honestly, must books are outdated by the time they’re printed.
Stick with online resources.
Yes your right things change so fast and there are a lot of great online resources. Something in me has the need to have a few good books around as well :) Thanks!
 

berkeman

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TBH, in addition to the medical resources and study books, I've found a couple other popular books by experienced Medics to be very helpful. In my 15 years of working part-time shifts (some crazy intense, some boring), it has been helpful to read these small paperbacks written by medics on the front lines, and see many of the same issues and feelings that I've encountered. Hope these help:

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Jn1232th

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Number one resource: ask questions.
I work as a medic in a 911 system and have a BRAND new EMT as my partner. I don’t mind at all but told him just ask questions as they come involving calls. Your not going to know everything going on, I still don’t expect things that I come across. Like others said, most books are outdated (which is true)
 

NomadicMedic

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I have bookshelves full of reference material. I never use it. The pack rat in me refuses to let them go, but EVERY TIME I need to find something, I research it on line.

The only thing I ever reference is program material I’ve taken from speciality or proprietary classes like National Fire Academy courses or the course material from the Fitch programs. But even that stuff is sourced from readily accessible content available online.

If you like books, that’s great. I do too, and I find it comforting to have a big set of reference material at my fingers, but when researching a specific topic, it’s MUCH quicker and easier to find validated info by doing a search online. (Google scholar is your friend)
 
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EMTrook

Forum Probie
11
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I have bookshelves full of reference material. I never use it. The pack rat in me refuses to let them go, but EVERY TIME I need to find something, I research it on line.

The only thing I ever reference is program material I’ve taken from speciality or proprietary classes like National Fire Academy courses or the course material from the Fitch programs. But even that stuff is sourced from readily accessible content available online.

If you like books, that’s great. I do too, and I find it comforting to have a big set of reference material at my fingers, but when researching a specific topic, it’s MUCH quicker and easier to find validated info by doing a search online. (Google scholar is your fr
 
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EMTrook

Forum Probie
11
2
3
I have bookshelves full of reference material. I never use it. The pack rat in me refuses to let them go, but EVERY TIME I need to find something, I research it on line.

The only thing I ever reference is program material I’ve taken from speciality or proprietary classes like National Fire Academy courses or the course material from the Fitch programs. But even that stuff is sourced from readily accessible content available online.

If you like books, that’s great. I do too, and I find it comforting to have a big set of reference material at my fingers, but when researching a specific topic, it’s MUCH quicker and easier to find validated info by doing a search online. (Google scholar is your friend)
Makes sense - TY
 
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EMTrook

Forum Probie
11
2
3
Number one resource: ask questions.
I work as a medic in a 911 system and have a BRAND new EMT as my partner. I don’t mind at all but told him just ask questions as they come involving calls. Your not going to know everything going on, I still don’t expect things that I come across. Like others said, most books are outdated (which is true)

TBH, in addition to the medical resources and study books, I've found a couple other popular books by experienced Medics to be very helpful. In my 15 years of working part-time shifts (some crazy intense, some boring), it has been helpful to read these small paperbacks written by medics on the front lines, and see many of the same issues and feelings that I've encountered. Hope these help:

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TY! - These look interesting - Ill take a look maybe add to my Holiday list :) .
 
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EMTrook

Forum Probie
11
2
3
Number one resource: ask questions.
I work as a medic in a 911 system and have a BRAND new EMT as my partner. I don’t mind at all but told him just ask questions as they come involving calls. Your not going to know everything going on, I still don’t expect things that I come across. Like others said, most books are outdated (which is true)
TY. It makes sense that online is the best place for latest info. I've been riding 3rd as a volunteer for a few months now and have been lucky to have had been with some awesome Medics and EMTs that have been encouraging and willing to answer all my questions. It has been an eye opening experience so far and looking forward to learning as much as I can from a great group of professionals.
 
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