Jump Bags

rhan101277

Forum Deputy Chief
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I am looking for a good basic jump bag that I can put in my truck. I work during the day driving around to lots of places, it would be nice to have what I would need in case an emergency arises where I could help. Can anyone give me some good links for various bags?
 

Ridryder911

EMS Guru
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Get a fanny pack. Purchase some band-aids and maybe some tweezers and some 4X4's. Get some free gloves, and that will do you. Anymore than that would be a waste and will expire before using, as EMS should be responding soon and take over care.

Just remember, that bandage will probably be removed so the medic document the wound, etc..

R/r 911
 

Sasha

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I am looking for a good basic jump bag that I can put in my truck. I work during the day driving around to lots of places, it would be nice to have what I would need in case an emergency arises where I could help. Can anyone give me some good links for various bags?
A jump bag is reeaaally unnecessary. If I stop at an accident, I have gloves in my car, and things I can wad up and slap to an active bleed to hold pressure if its needed. Other than that, what do you need? Anything you put on will be (Or should be) taken off so the medics can see. You splint it, well, they need to document what the limb looked like and will cut the splint, dress and bandage, same thing.
 

micsaver

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Hi rhan- I was wondering the same thing recently and was glad I had this site to get some good info. You should really read the " The rules changed " thread in the BLS section. Check on the laws in your state for good samaritan, duty to act, and what your legally allowed to do when not on duty working under your Medical Directors licence.
 

medicdan

Forum Deputy Chief
Premium Member
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I don't mean to steal KEVD's job, but DO A SEARCH!!! We have had several LONG, illustrious discussions about keeping a personal kit in your car, the legality, what it could contain, good sam laws, etc.
Some keywords to search include:
POV
jump-kit
liability
 

Sasha

Forum Chief
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I don't mean to steal KEVD's job, but DO A SEARCH!!! We have had several LONG, illustrious discussions about keeping a personal kit in your car, the legality, what it could contain, good sam laws, etc.
Some keywords to search include:
POV
jump-kit
liability
Omg. Emt-student is a total Kev poser.
 

KEVD18

Forum Deputy Chief
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the more the merrier. maybe, just maybe, if enough people express their displeasure at constantly rehashing the same topic, this whole searching before posting thing will catch on.

strength in numbers..........
 

MRE

Forum Captain
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Get a fanny pack. Purchase some band-aids and maybe some tweezers and some 4X4's. Get some free gloves, and that will do you. Anymore than that would be a waste and will expire before using, as EMS should be responding soon and take over care.

Just remember, that bandage will probably be removed so the medic document the wound, etc..

R/r 911

Good stuff, I would add a couple 3x5 cards and a pen to make notes, write down SAMPLE findings, etc. Writing on a glove is ok, but not easy to hand to responding EMTs.

Also, a small bottle of eye wash might be good. I have seen enough people get stuff in their eyes, chemicals too, and need to have them washed out. Wouldn't cost you much space or weight.
 

Hal9000

Forum Captain
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We have a cabin in a very rural area in Montana. I don't have a jump bag, just my old vest, and it has some basic stuff that might come in handy. Sometimes it can take an ambulance (air or ground) almost an hour to reach a spot, although that's the exception.

I've used the items in there a good bit; we have no medics within 70 nm.

I strive not to be a Sparky.

Different location, different situation.
 

firecoins

IFT Puppet
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whats a Sparky?

I have a personal first in bag. I have tried to justify it but I can't. I use it to caddy my EMS belongings that I use on my shifts. Its the stuff most people keep on a belt. I keep it in my bag instead with several over-the-counter meds which i occassionally use for personal use.
 

Hal9000

Forum Captain
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A Sparky is

One of the new people that thinks they can deck their car out into an ambulance now that they have their basic. :rolleyes: I know several. I know a guy that lived in Hartford for 14 years doing EMS there and that's what he called them. Reminded me of my late dog who was also very...eager. I like the term.

I can't justify a "real" bag myself-I'm just one person alone and I'd never use it, plus it would take up a lot of space. Kind of like your "ferrying case," I use my vest when I volunteer*, and if I leave it at the barn people tend to wear it and not replace things. So there's another reason why I keep it with me.

:excl:*Keep in mind that it's volunteer or nothing where I spend my summers. There are a lot of issues that get people's hair up on here, and I don't think any discourse is needed on this.
 

KEVD18

Forum Deputy Chief
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sparky = whacker.

i have a jump bag in my truck thats been there for as long as ive been an emt and only remains because i cant think of any place other to keep it. i can count on one hand how many times ive used something from it(for medical reasons) and still hahve enough fingers left over to pick my nose and dial my phone.

if i took the time to do the inventory, im willing to bet its all expired. i wont doo this of course, because that time would far exceedc the amount of time ive spent and expect to spend using it for medical reasons. this is time i could use to sleep, cook, eat, smoke, or merely sit in my favorite are chair and stair at the crack in my ceiling that gets bogger everytime i look at it and think about the money i spent repairing it last time.
 
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el Murpharino

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The size of your jumpkit should be directly proportional to the size of your lightbar on your POV.
 
OP
rhan101277

rhan101277

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I will just get some gloves and such, I am not finished with class yet. I don't plan on using my POV or volunteering. If I come up on a wreck though I just don't want to drive right on by.
 

mycrofft

Still crazy but elsewhere
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Think out of the box, and turn the telescope around.

If you rolled up on a MVA (most likely encounter from your description), what would you like most for a bystander to do before you got there?

First, stay out of trouble. Don't add yourself as another victim or pesky bystander. Park "upstream" on traffic if SAFELY possible and start there, your marker lights and headlights may be of use and you will not block incoming units. Stay away from fire hydrants.

Second, make a fast survey and call or send for help. How many, where are you, what do you see. Also, see #1 above. Have the non-emergency numbers for local FD and law enforcement as well as emergency numbers, sometimes (especically on cell phones) you will be very delayed phoning in to 911. If no cell phone, have phone change, you may have to leave the scene to call for help if out in the sticks.

Third, scene safety. See item one above. Have a safety vest, at least five warning devices which will not start a fire, weather gear (you should dress to change a tire always, or carry it with you). A good hundred yards upstream, begin your warning device pattern in the gutter/on the shoulder and bring it over to the line no farther than 100 feet out, local conditions allowing. If needed, go back to the last intersection and mark it there to prevent cars stuffing a bottlenecked road and blocking arriving units. Look and smell for fuel. Tell people they need to turn off their ignitions and put the keys in their pockets, grab their purses or other essentials and, if they can, get to the shoulder/curb to await help.

FOURTH: begin second survey and then start helping people without unnecessary movment.

Every scene's a little different, and some are a LOT different, but always refer to step #1. As a samaritan first responder your first duty is scene safety and last is trying to engage in medical activity.
 
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csly27

Forum Lieutenant
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I just keep a reg first aid kit in the car, peroxide bandaids neosprin so far have only had to use it on the kids lol comes in handy at the park, but I laso have my cert bag has a helmate, vest, gloves, rope flashlight, batteries, bee sting kit, things like that

(but remember I am still a student) :)
 

tydek07

Forum Captain
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Go on ebay and search "First Responder Bags" or something like that.... you will get a lot of results. If you don't want to buy one from there, a lot of them list what all included, so you can just make your own if you want.
 

shovellogger

Forum Ride Along
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out in the sticks

Everyone here assumes that everyone lives in the city.
I am a volunteer in a very rural district. recently we had a call that took our ambulance an hour drive into the back country on old logging roads. The helicopter was 60 mins out. The nearest LZ was 30 min from the scene, no cell service. The pt had fallen approx. 15 feet into some rocks, head and spinal injuries, various lacerations, one serious. He was conscious, oriented, and having chest pain. His buddy hiked a quarter mile to their vehicle, then drove thirty min to cell service. Had that been my friend what would i have wanted in my kit?
 

firecoins

IFT Puppet
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its an old thread. Nothing wrong with a samll bag but what is it your going to carry in a rural bag that is going to make a big difference? You can carry some basic supplies but pt still needs a hospital.
 

mycrofft

Still crazy but elsewhere
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A satellite phone and a xenon floodlight.

Not much you can do for massive stuff except airway, bleeding, circ (ABC) and minimze mnovement. Maybe splint fractures, but that can be done by splinting arms to torso, legs to each other, with strips of cloth or cravats and some padding. Oh, and scene safety, including statying warm or cool enough.
Once you start spinal immobilization you are tied to the pt and introduce potential airway and circulatory troubles. If they can breathe and safely remain where they are, work on getting help.
 

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