Interview tips!

nnkmbh

Forum Ride Along
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0
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Hi,

I have an upcoming interview with PRN ambulance in LA. I already had my phone interview and know that the next steps involve an in person interview, a gurney lift, and a written exam. I was wondering if anyone knows what kind of interview questions they may ask ... would it be personality based or will they ask more knowledge based questions. If anyone has any tips about the manual gurney as well as what kinds of interview questions they might ask it would be greatly appreciated. Btw, this would be my first ever EMT interview so I'm super excited but also really nervous so any and all advice would be really helpful.
 

M3dicalR3dn3ck

Idolizes Johnny and Roy
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If they ask if you're in other hiring processes, lie and tell them no. Tell that specific service that they're God's gift to earth and you'd never wanna work for anyone else
 

FiremanMike

Just a dude
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Hi,

I have an upcoming interview with PRN ambulance in LA. I already had my phone interview and know that the next steps involve an in person interview, a gurney lift, and a written exam. I was wondering if anyone knows what kind of interview questions they may ask ... would it be personality based or will they ask more knowledge based questions. If anyone has any tips about the manual gurney as well as what kinds of interview questions they might ask it would be greatly appreciated. Btw, this would be my first ever EMT interview so I'm super excited but also really nervous so any and all advice would be really helpful.
You’ll be fine, just be enthusiastic and polite. Make good eye contact, act like you genuinely want to be there.
 

Aprz

Non flying critical care flight attendant
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636
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EMS interviews are not that different than any other kind of job interview. They are most likely going to open up with "Tell us about yourself." They are then going to follow up with questions about customer service, conflict resolution, stress, team work, communication, safety, etc.. They questions are almost always the same, but just asked differently. They might give a scenario or ask for specific experience with those subjects. For example, they might give you a scenario like "You have an interfacility transfer that is scheduled to be picked up at 8:00 AM. You show up early at 7:30 AM, but the nurse is angry with you saying that you are late. She says the pick up was suppose to be at 7 AM. What do you do?" Obviously they are trying to see how you'll do with conflict resolution and customer service. They are probably going to expect you to take it (deal with the customer being mad), they want you to try to do something like involve a supervisor, and try to understand what went wrong. Maybe you were told 8 AM, but maybe the nurse is right, the patient was suppose to go at 7 AM. Your supervisor will have to get to the bottom of this on where the miscommunication happened and how to prevent this in the future. Instead of giving a scenario, they might ask you "Tell us a time that you had a disagreement with someone. How did you handle it?" Pretty much the same question, but asked differently. These are difficult because you have to select a story, an experience, and tell it in a good way to them. Before interviews, I usually try to reflect on my experience with customer service, conflict resolution, stress, team work, communication, safety, etc.. Your experience with these things don't have to be EMS related or even work related. Have a handful of these stories ready. Practice sharing them with yourself in the mirror, with friends, or family members.

EMT is an entry level position. The majority of people they interview will likely be fresh from EMT school or not have a ton of experience. It's OK.

There aren't usually too many clinical questions, if any. Usually they are straight forward.
 
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