Interview for ED Tech; I think I'm in way over my head

eodginger

Forum Ride Along
8
2
3
I've landed an interview as an Emergency Department Tech, as well as a for a private ambulance company the following week. While ER tech is basically a dream job for college, my confidence has been crushed from a couple of posts on here, and I'm wondering if I should focus on the private ambulance interview.

My background:
Emergency Medical Technician School, military(non-med), and some retail jobs...that's it.

They want: Less than 1 year experience, EMT OR Para cert

And here's the odd part
: Required Education:High School Diploma or GED.
Completion of approved Emergency Medical Care course with a core curriculum of 260 hours plus 25 and 100 rescue hours. Successful completion of the didactic and clinical portion of the fundamentals of intravenous (IV) training.



1.So in order to land this job do I have to be I.V. certified, or they will train me if they pick me up? If I.V. is not within the scope of practice for EMT-B, why wouldn't they restrict the position to Paramedics? I plan on asking the HR rep, but I was looking for some background info before I make myself look like an *** for applying to a job I was clearly unqualified for.

2.There is an I.V. course happening down in Orlando this weekend, and the interview is on Monday. Is it worth taking this I.V. course for around $200 and lodging for just the shot at this job, or are my chances astronomically slim with my background?

3.I'm either blatantly under-qualified for this position and the HR is outsourced to a company that only looks at key-words and questionnaires to filter interviewees, or, they actually decided to interview ME thinking I was a valid candidate. If the latter is true, what possible ways can I make sure I give myself the best fighting chance for this since I will be going up against medics and people with experience? Study up on the hospital? Procedures? Basic knowledge?

Thanks ahead of time!
 

STXmedic

Forum Burnout
Premium Member
5,018
1,354
113
1) Calm down. You're way over thinking this. If they offered you an interview, show up well dressed, on time, and cross your fingers.

2) You're not underqualified. ER Tech is nothing crazy. And don't go spending money. If they want you to start IVs, which it sounds like they do, they'll train you to start IVs (unless they specifically tell you otherwise). It's a simple skill that can be taught in an afternoon. You won't be very proficient to start, but that's normal.

So calm down, be confident, and try to have a good interview.
 

MonkeyArrow

Forum Asst. Chief
788
237
43
First of all, did the hospital listing say LESS than 1 years experience or MORE? If it actually is LESS than, the hospital probably wants the person who is the most minimally qualified and will take the least amount of pay.

From the listing that was italicized in your post, it seems as though you need to have I.V. credentials to apply for the job. They will not provide that on the job training as starting lines is a primary job function of an ER tech.

As to whether basics can do IVs, that depends on your state. For example, reading on here, I know Colorado has an EMT-IV cert. Stating what state you are in would help other to chime in.

If you go forward, do your best to read up on the company and look knowledgeable and professional, your usual run of the mill interview tips.
 
OP
eodginger

eodginger

Forum Ride Along
8
2
3
Thanks for the replies. I'm in Florida, which does not does not qualify EMT-B to start I.V.s.
If I go into the interview with the bad attitude I show above, I clearly wont even stand a chance. With that being said, it is a GROUP interview, so I would hate to show up looking like a burger-flipper who applied to a nuclear-engineering position.
 

OnceAnEMT

Forum Asst. Chief
734
170
43
I agree, don't go blow any money on chance here, unless we are talking shoes and tie for the interview (only because you can where those in another interview in a few years). They offered you an interview. What is your alternative, call them and say "I'm not qualified, sorry."? Go in confident.

Job postings are meant to be official, and come stock from HR. The ED is their own department and can hire whoever they want. Seen folks skirt past requirements plenty of times. When I was interviewing for my job the director made mention of my lack of experience (literally 1 month on an IFT truck in a different city), then changed directions by saying they can teach employees the skills, what they can't teach is the character. Good luck in the interview.

About the IFT job, hell, do both interviews. As an undergrad and an ER Tech I strongly suggest the ER Tech job, as it is probably more flexible. If you hear back from the ED before the IFT interview, cancel that IFT interview. If you don't, do the IFT interview. Your dilemma then would be if IFT offered on the spot while you still waited for the ED. Even then, you can always quit. Yeah it looks back, yeah it isn't the nicest of things. But who's looking? Like I said, 1 month on an IFT truck in a different city, I did the exact same thing (I actually applied to the tech job on Day 1).

An aside - I really hate seeing Paramedics working as ER Techs. At least where I am at, we have Techs (EMTs), Paramedics, and Nurses. Talk about a waste of the paramedic's time. Couldn't imagine doing the 2 years of school then not being able to do any ALS skills.
 
OP
eodginger

eodginger

Forum Ride Along
8
2
3
Seems to be the answer everyone is telling me. Just go in confident. I just have to find a non-air-headed way of saying that I can acquire the I.V. cert in a couple of days following the interview and get back with them. Now I just need to focus on the interview questions, and how to embellish my military and customer service background over my lack of experience.
 

OnceAnEMT

Forum Asst. Chief
734
170
43
Seems to be the answer everyone is telling me. Just go in confident. I just have to find a non-air-headed way of saying that I can acquire the I.V. cert in a couple of days following the interview and get back with them. Now I just need to focus on the interview questions, and how to embellish my military and customer service background over my lack of experience.

Don't even bring it up. You don't walk into an interview and say "I only went to community college, but...", nor do you discuss your fear of other people's bodily fluids. If THEY mention in, now it's time to discuss. Perhaps think about an answer there. But I highly discourage bringing it up yourself.

Working in an ED IS providing customer service. You are providing services at great expense of the customer, and trust me, they want the best, and so does every person auditing the department (from the SNU to the director to JCAHO). As well, you do all of that as a team, just like you did in the military.
 
OP
eodginger

eodginger

Forum Ride Along
8
2
3
From what I heard/saw on website, the hospital asks a lot of questions regarding "In this situation, what would you do?" and some one actual procedures. I'm guessing I can look up most patient care tech behavioral interview questions to study up on? and regarding the procedures.. should I just brush up on what I've learned through EMT, or should I try to find out the procedures ER techs do and learn about them (although not certified for some of them)
 

STXmedic

Forum Burnout
Premium Member
5,018
1,354
113
The more you know and the more prepared you are, the better.
 

OnceAnEMT

Forum Asst. Chief
734
170
43
The more you know and the more prepared you are, the better.

This.

That said, the "scenario" questions in an oral interview are generally hunting a particular personality or behavior, not necessarily skill set. I would expect the question of, "You witness a co-worker taking a cellphone picture of a patient's chart. What, if anything, do you do?" more than "An approximately 23 y/o female patient approaches triage not appearing sick and complaining of left wrist pain secondary to punching a wall. What is the appropriate triage level?".

There are different types of oral interviews intended on different focuses. It's tough to ask procedure/protocol based questions because the simple answer is that you don't know the company's protocol yet. Sure you could provide a general answer, "reference protocol here" and "there", but now we're just wasting time.
 

Underoath87

Forum Asst. Chief
661
193
43
Being an ER tech at Shands would be a great experience, since they're a level I trauma center and have every capability/specialty imaginable.
Man, I really miss Gainesville sometimes...

And to ease your mind: I don't think they're looking for some elite EMS veteran. They generally just want somebody who isn't lazy and will do as they are asked. So your military experience should be a strong leg up.
 
OP
eodginger

eodginger

Forum Ride Along
8
2
3
Does anyone have experience with group interviews? How is this going to change the interview dynamic?
 

STXmedic

Forum Burnout
Premium Member
5,018
1,354
113
They'll usually just go down a list taking turns asking you questions. I've never felt they were all that different.
 

Ocean711

Forum Crew Member
36
1
8
I can't speak for all hospitals, but I know a few EMT's that got jobs at hospitals and they were trained to do IV's after they were hired. They live in Florida too. I think it's usually a course through the hospital that the hospital paid for. I wouldn't worry about it (like a previous poster said).

My two interviews were panel interviews and I didn't find them any more difficult than any other interview, I got both jobs too. Good luck, it sounds like you'll do great.
 

CODE X FLATLINE

Forum Ride Along
4
1
1
I've been following this thread with keen interest with intent to advise however it is now Tuesday so all I would have to say is probably academic, I will say this in retrospect though, you're ex military so Shands already had your DD214 so that's a very positive feather in your cap, also being ex military your survival skill set is to adapt to fluid situations that most interviews present so adapt, reacquire & react accordingly, voice your pleasure to serve willingly & quest to further your skillset for the team. Above all exude honor, it's inviolate.
 
OP
eodginger

eodginger

Forum Ride Along
8
2
3
I got the job with Shands! It is a PRN position, but I am curious if I should still interview with the private ambulance. If I have a PRN position, and school 2 days a week, would it be worth picking up a second job? Would it be too bold to ask HR the hours of the position?
 

STXmedic

Forum Burnout
Premium Member
5,018
1,354
113
No, just call and ask how many hours to expect.
 

Top