Graduate Degrees: Who Foots the Bill?

MMiz

I put the M in EMTLife
Community Leader
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Last night I spent some time looking at EMS programs around my state. I was shocked at the number of EMS educators with graduate degrees from online institutions.

As someone with a graduate degree in a non-EMS field, I went with a state university to save a boatload of money. Otherwise, it wouldn't have made financial sense in my field.

Are graduate degrees in EMS really worth it? How are people affording the insane tuition of out of state programs?
 

CALEMT

The Other Guy/ Paramaybe?
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While it's not totally related to EMS, if you go to the right state you can find a cheap college. As most people know CA is crazy expensive when it come to college. My sister is currently at the University of Wyoming studying criminal justice for a Bachelor's degree. Tuition is much cheaper than here (CA). My dad went back to school a couple years ago to get his Bachelor's degree in criminal justice (he needed a Bachelor's to promote). He did his schooling online from Ashford university, he also worked full time (LEO). While I don't remember how much it was, I do remember my parents cutting back on a couple things to be able to afford it.

While nobody in my family has any sort of EMS degree, I'm sure you could find a cheap enough online or physical program. I personally think a EMS degree isn't worth it. I would peruse some other type of degree.
 

NysEms2117

ex-Parole officer/EMT
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The tax payers of NYS are footing my bill to go to nursing school(BSN). I am almost in the same exact boat. I graduated with a B.S in criminal justice/criminology, minor in comp sci. Nursing is not an EMS degree. But the state of New York will pay for any college credits at an institution, under 12 per semester, they are changing it to 10 soon :(. Nursing school for me while working full time will be under 2,000 dollars, all I have to pay for is books and gas.
 

EpiEMS

Forum Deputy Chief
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For what it's worth, the 2001 LEADS ("Longitudinal Emergency Medical Technician Demographic Study") conducted by NREMT produced data showing that 37.9% of EMTs (EMT-Basics, as the nomenclature was at the time) and 48.6% of paramedics (EMT-Paramedics) had a tuition assistance benefit, as published in PHEC in 2003.
 

WolfmanHarris

Forum Asst. Chief
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I'm lucky in that not only is my employer covering the full cost of my Advanced Care Paramedic program (typically 15k for tuition since post-grad program tuition isn't regulated) including books, supplies, etc. AND paying my full time pay and benefits while I'm in school without the hassle of having to actually work on the truck. They've contracted a nearby college to run a satellite program at our HQ rather than have us go and join the regular ACP class. Other employers in my province will reimburse some or all tuition for ACP, but we're one of a few that goes this far.

We're very lucky to have a lot of education opportunities. For the IMPACT community Paramedicine study starting next year they're sending 10 of our ACP's back to school for another six months to train them for the expanded scope they'll be using in the study.
 

EpiEMS

Forum Deputy Chief
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I'm lucky in that not only is my employer covering the full cost of my Advanced Care Paramedic program (typically 15k for tuition since post-grad program tuition isn't regulated) including books, supplies, etc. AND paying my full time pay and benefits while I'm in school without the hassle of having to actually work on the truck.
When you say post-graduate, do you mean that your ACP program is at the graduate degree level (i.e. beyond a Bachelors' degree)? If you don't mind my asking, what country are you in
that this is the case? (I think that's only in the UK, though, of course I could be wrong!)
 

VentMonkey

Family Guy
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If you don't mind my asking, what country are you in
that this is the case? (I think that's only in the UK, though, of course I could be wrong!)
My spidey senses are saying Ontario, Canada.
 

EpiEMS

Forum Deputy Chief
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My spidey senses are saying Ontario, Canada.
Ah, I didn't know that! Thanks!

I could have sworn PCP was an associates' degree in the Great White North?
 

WolfmanHarris

Forum Asst. Chief
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Sorry terminology issues:
In University we have the standard bachelors, Masters, PhD

Paramedic education is delivered via the Community/Technical College system (though there are some combined programs where you complete a BSc simultaneously): They have certificates and diplomas. A certificate that requires completion of a previous diploma is called a Post-Grad Certificate.

We're still a number of years away from changing our education system over to 4 year BSc for entry to practice. The new framework is expected from PAC in 2025 and will take a number of years to filter down.
 

EpiEMS

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Paramedic education is delivered via the Community/Technical College system (though there are some combined programs where you complete a BSc simultaneously): They have certificates and diplomas. A certificate that requires completion of a previous diploma is called a Post-Grad Certificate.

Makes sense in this context. I typically wouldn't call it post-grad unless it was beyond the baccalaureate level, but I see what you're saying. Thanks for clarifying!
 

WolfmanHarris

Forum Asst. Chief
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Makes sense in this context. I typically wouldn't call it post-grad unless it was beyond the baccalaureate level, but I see what you're saying. Thanks for clarifying!

I didn't pick the term. I think Professional Certificate might have been a better descriptor but like most things, the powers to be did not seek my counsel before deciding. (When will they ever learn.)

Looking back, I skipped the main point of my post originally, my employer (large regional government) pays for Master in Public Policy programs for senior manager I know and we do have lots of tuition reimbursement programs that would probably apply if I pursued a Masters related to my job.
 

ExpatMedic0

MS, NRP
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I think an undergraduate degree in EMS is fine, but anything above that I would not get it specifically in EMS, but rather a broader major or become a midlevel. I'm in grad school on campus right now. I'm staying in EMS for now. Also good article in JEMS this month (December 2016) on page 54 related to this.
 

ExpatMedic0

MS, NRP
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To answer your question though, GI Bill footed half the bill until it ran out, and I footed the other half
 

EpiEMS

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I think an undergraduate degree in EMS is fine, but anything above that I would not get it specifically in EMS, but rather a broader major or become a midlevel. I'm in grad school on campus right now. I'm staying in EMS for now. Also good article in JEMS this month (December 2016) on page 54 related to this.

Was this the article you had in mind? The author definitely makes some valid points!
 

ExpatMedic0

MS, NRP
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Yes that's the one
 

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