Going up a level

emtb14

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Looking for opinions on if/how long you should wait before moving up levels in EMS. From EMT-B to EMT-P, or EMT-B to EMT-I. I could understand going from EMT-B to EMT-P as being a huge step and maybe one to wait longer on. But moving through the levels, adding on a few skills/knowledge at a time, might not need as much time in between?
 

TransportJockey

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As fast as you feel comfortable. I know some amazing medics who went from basic to medic in one shot
 

Chewy20

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Looking for opinions on if/how long you should wait before moving up levels in EMS. From EMT-B to EMT-P, or EMT-B to EMT-I. I could understand going from EMT-B to EMT-P as being a huge step and maybe one to wait longer on. But moving through the levels, adding on a few skills/knowledge at a time, might not need as much time in between?

I find it is usually said to be a basic for at least a year before going to medic school, and some schools require a certain amount of hours worked before you can apply. In my opinion I say just go when you feel ready, as stated above some people don't work as an EMT at all before going to medic school and turn out fine. My only caution is to work long enough as an EMT just to make sure you are happy with the field of work you are in. I imagine some people go from EMTB-EMTP in one shot and end up hating the EMS life because they never gave it a go as a basic. Mine as well see if you like it before you spend all the money and time for p school. Good luck.
 

joshrunkle35

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Completely depends upon who you are as a learner, whether you absorb book material or experience better, where you plan on working in the future, the quality of the schooling, the quality of the clinicals and ride alongs, how hard you study, if you are good at continuing to learn after schooling, how much patient contact you would have as an EMT (are you volunteering somewhere and you only see two cases a month, or are you at a busy metropolitan department?)...there are countless variables. If you feel comfortable in yourself and your future schooling, then go for it. If you want some time to learn on the job or learn by experience, then take a year to work as a basic. Frankly, I think how you are paying for school is a bigger decision. If your work is paying for a part of your schooling, wait and get that money. If you're paying for it on your own, I'd go straight for finishing medic faster, so you can start earning a slightly higher wage faster.
 
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emtb14

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I'm looking into going into an EMT-I course. By the time I would finish that course, I would be a basic for a year. I would say I've experienced a good amount of calls since becoming a basic. A lot of what I hear is that you should be a solid basic before going forward. Thank you for the replies! It's difficult to decide when you get so many mixed reactions
 

Chewy20

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I'm looking into going into an EMT-I course. By the time I would finish that course, I would be a basic for a year. I would say I've experienced a good amount of calls since becoming a basic. A lot of what I hear is that you should be a solid basic before going forward. Thank you for the replies! It's difficult to decide when you get so many mixed reactions

unless your are hires EMT-I's as EMT-I's (Most dont) and pays more than I would advise just going ahead with paramedic school. No point to EMT-I if they are going to make you work as a basic.
 

46Young

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Looking for opinions on if/how long you should wait before moving up levels in EMS. From EMT-B to EMT-P, or EMT-B to EMT-I. I could understand going from EMT-B to EMT-P as being a huge step and maybe one to wait longer on. But moving through the levels, adding on a few skills/knowledge at a time, might not need as much time in between?

In some parts of the country, the EMT-I is basically a paramedic with a small fraction of the education and training. By going from EMT-B to paramedic, you're getting all of the education that you need to go along with those interventions and diagnostics. When you go from EMT-B to EMT-I, you're doing most of what a medic can do, but you're much less prepared to do do the job.

Which choice makes better sense, get some training and do ALS, or get all of the education before doing ALS? EMT-B to paramedic isn't a bigger jump than doing EMT-I, rather you're ensuring that you're fully prepared before practicing ALS. If anything, doing EMT-I rather than doing the paramedic program is a bigger jump, since you're doing the job with much less knowledge to work off of.

EMT-B for a year tops, then medic school, IMO.

Edit: If your employer will treat en EMT-I as a basic, the EMT-I course is an even bigger waste of time. Just do the paramedic program once, rather than do EMT-I, and then have to repeat everything you've learned in I-school.
 
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abckidsmom

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In some parts of the country, the EMT-I is basically a paramedic with a small fraction of the education and training. By going from EMT-B to paramedic, you're getting all of the education that you need to go along with those interventions and diagnostics. When you go from EMT-B to EMT-I, you're doing most of what a medic can do, but you're much less prepared to do do the job.



Which choice makes better sense, get some training and do ALS, or get all of the education before doing ALS? EMT-B to paramedic isn't a bigger jump than doing EMT-I, rather you're ensuring that you're fully prepared before practicing ALS. If anything, doing EMT-I rather than doing the paramedic program is a bigger jump, since you're doing the job with much less knowledge to work off of.



EMT-B for a year tops, then medic school, IMO.



Edit: If your employer will treat en EMT-I as a basic, the EMT-I course is an even bigger waste of time. Just do the paramedic program once, rather than do EMT-I, and then have to repeat everything you've learned in I-school.


He's spot on. EMT-I is not a baby step. And it's a lot of work that may not be accepted by many agencies.
 

Blue13

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Ok, good replies, educated people on deck - I'm an enthusiastic work horse of an emt-b working for a private ambulance company in Dallas, getting burned out doing routine transport bs. PT'S are in very little need of intervention & frankly, getting bored. Renewed my nat'l cert, CE's few n far between, need a more challenging route to keep my interest but 37, almost 38 y/o, so FD isn't really an option. Ideas, thoughts, suggestions welcome. .
 

joshrunkle35

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Ok, good replies, educated people on deck - I'm an enthusiastic work horse of an emt-b working for a private ambulance company in Dallas, getting burned out doing routine transport bs. PT'S are in very little need of intervention & frankly, getting bored. Renewed my nat'l cert, CE's few n far between, need a more challenging route to keep my interest but 37, almost 38 y/o, so FD isn't really an option. Ideas, thoughts, suggestions welcome. .


My main point was that there are so many variables that only someone who has worked with you or a teacher or preceptor who has spent a lot of time with you and knows the future program you choose can really give you this advice.

As far as the Internet goes, you would know way more information than you can express in words.

If you want to do paramedic school, go for it. If you want to wait, wait. I wouldn't waste time on EMT-I unless it was free.
 

Blue13

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My main point was that there are so many variables that only someone who has worked with you or a teacher or preceptor who has spent a lot of time with you and knows the future program you choose can really give you this advice.

As far as the Internet goes, you would know way more information than you can express in words.

If you want to do paramedic school, go for it. If you want to wait, wait. I wouldn't waste time on EMT-I unless it was free.

Understood, sir - & I thought about the EMT-I as a step up, my problem at hand is burn out via boredom. What's your opinion (others welcome) of a job in hospital, if even part time? I thought I might be able to learn a little more from docs & nurses - other than complaining about my schedule & coworkers, of course. . :p
 

joshrunkle35

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Depends what your future goals are. A paramedic in hospital does about the same job of an EMT out of hospital, with the exception of starting IVs...and EMTs provide patient care, whereas Paramedics in hospital are often used to triage, get vital signs and start IVs. You'll spend plenty of time in a hospital during Paramedic clinicals. I would decide after that.

If you can't get a job anywhere else, then hospital experience is better than none.

If you like the hospital environment, then you should consider a field like respiratory therapy, nursing or PA, where you'll work in a hospital. EMS is a different animal because the entire purpose behind it is pre-hospital treatment, not hospital treatment.
 

Blue13

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Depends what your future goals are. A paramedic in hospital does about the same job of an EMT out of hospital, with the exception of starting IVs...and EMTs provide patient care, whereas Paramedics in hospital are often used to triage, get vital signs and start IVs. You'll spend plenty of time in a hospital during Paramedic clinicals. I would decide after that.

If you can't get a job anywhere else, then hospital experience is better than none.

If you like the hospital environment, then you should consider a field like respiratory therapy, nursing or PA, where you'll work in a hospital. EMS is a different animal because the entire purpose behind it is pre-hospital treatment, not hospital treatment.

Agreed, and the field (ie prehospital) is where I like to be - I think my conundrum is re-igniting the flame. 'Preciate the advice. Best things come to those who wait & patience is one of my strong suits..
 
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emtb14

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Sorry, "aemt" rather.
Looking at what both aemt and paramedics are taught,
it seems to me that paramedics have much, much more still.
I'm looking at the ems . gov site for their educational standards of both. There's about double for the paramedic as there is for aemt.

And yes, aemt would be payed for where paramedic would not.
I feel that paramedics still take on a much bigger responsibility, seeing as a lot of companies around here seem to have at least one paramedic on each truck at a time. That is where the "baby step" seems to be. You're learning the skills without being fully relied on by the rest of the crew. Then you get to practice your skills with still being able to look towards the paramedic for help when needed. Being a paramedic, you are more likely to be paired with a basic provider who can't necessarily help you with your advance skills, haha. I think it would be helpful to get adjusted to being a more advanced provider without being thrown out immediately to be in charge of all calls.
 
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