"Getting close to" * Teacher

mycrofft

Still crazy but elsewhere
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I'm tired of female students coming to a CPR class, where presumably they know they'll be doing CPR on manikins, with very low cut tops, three inch heels, etc. (So far, no guys drooping too far or male crop tops).

Last time the two who did were rearranging their clothing to present more cleavage before we started floor exercise.

Anyone else having this problem? Or should I just sell tickets? I've asked ARC to tell students on their acceptance e-mails and letter what to wear, but they say they can't.


*"Get close to", as in "Let's get close to Charlie" was slang way back when which I heard being used by Rangers when they were going to pull a trick to get close to then mess with someone, like (Victor) Charlie. Under your skin then do as they say.
 

OnceAnEMT

Forum Asst. Chief
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During my EMT school we all had to take a CPR course through the city agency (even though we all had cards from elsewhere in order to get in the school). It was a casual day, with different instructors. Having seen classmates in only uniform at that point, it was kind of funny to see legs. No cleavage issues.

People will be people. In Athletic Training, it is unfortunate to see a large majority of students having flirty relationships with their athletes, male and female.
 

ThadeusJ

Forum Lieutenant
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Give 'em lab coats or have them do the test in a more realistic setting like outside in the rain and mud with the patient covered in blood.
 

Carlos Danger

Forum Deputy Chief
Premium Member
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I'm tired of female students coming to a CPR class, where presumably they know they'll be doing CPR on manikins, with very low cut tops, three inch heels, etc. (So far, no guys drooping too far or male crop tops).

Last time the two who did were rearranging their clothing to present more cleavage before we started floor exercise.

Anyone else having this problem? Or should I just sell tickets? I've asked ARC to tell students on their acceptance e-mails and letter what to wear, but they say they can't.

I'm sorry, but I don't see why you describe this as a problem.

I say that part jokingly, but part seriously. Is it really an issue?
 

joshrunkle35

EMT-P/RN
583
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If it's part of a school function, cover required clothing ahead of time in a syllabus. If not, list it in the course info. If it's a "show up as you are and learn CPR" type-thing, then realize that people in the world are like that, and learn to accept it as the way it is.

I think leaving lab coats available is a nice gesture for people who are unprepared, but forcing someone to wear one because you personally find their clothing morally objectionable is very rude.
 

Summit

Critical Crazy
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OK... I've never whipped this phrase out ever before in my life:

Get with the times, old man! :rolleyes:
 
OP
mycrofft

mycrofft

Still crazy but elsewhere
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More on my sexist rant

...and get off my lawn!

Ahahaha! I knew you'd get that in there!:rofl:

Ditto Summit.

My "sell tickets" comment was very sexist, but the phenomenon is very sexist as well. The closest I have been to a male getting there was the one who had a large photo purportedly of his naked girlfriend (back half-turned) printed on his tshirt.

I am not allowed to tell them to somehow dress differently. I asked about some clean used formal shirts or something but was told "no". I would take it upon myself if there's a health or safety issue, but there isn't, just potential embarrassment. I just have to bear it (no grinning or the wife and daughter will tease me unmercifully) and keep my eyes UP.

It's their fashion decision, but they're going to do the whole deal like everyone else.

So, how many guys want to sign up as an instructor?
 

Rin

Forum Captain
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Last time the two who did were rearranging their clothing to present more cleavage before we started floor exercise.

As a female who likes to wear tank tops, what looks like boob-plumping may actually be bra-adjusting to prevent nip slips. Also, I've taken CPR classes where the mannequins were arranged on the tables instead of the floor.
 

Anjel

Forum Angel
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I adjust my boobs all the time at work. Just like guys adjust their balls. It's not to make them look better. Just make sure one isn't trying to roam free. Especially after doing chest compressions.

But I do see what you are saying. Can't they just say "dress for physical activity".
 

UnkiEMT

Forum Truck Monkey
Premium Member
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I've had a few women show up for classes wearing what I would consider to be inappropriate clothing, but ultimately it's their potential embarrassment, not mine, so I don't really care. I just mentally class them in the same category as patients, and thus asexual, so I don't get distracted and get on with things.

Also, with the mannequins on the table, unless you're going to have the students climb onto the table, you're not going to be able to get most people to do effective compressions. You need the leverage of height to really get that force applied.
 

Rin

Forum Captain
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Also, with the mannequins on the table, unless you're going to have the students climb onto the table, you're not going to be able to get most people to do effective compressions. You need the leverage of height to really get that force applied.

I'll second that. I think the instructor just had us go through the motions and didn't grade us on compression depth. A bit half-assed by my standards, but we still learned.
 
OP
mycrofft

mycrofft

Still crazy but elsewhere
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No tabletop manikins.

We're told manikins on the table is a fail.

Everything else is so subjective I'm not going to make a play by play description of moving outer garments back off the shoulders like a shawl, etc.

Anyway, I'm pretty much done teaching. Like the teaching, but tired of the BS the companies come up with to try to make more money or more tightly control what I do when my students have rescues (two I know of), pass their tests, and award me fives and sixes.

In that same vein, if a student decided to beef me for staring or declaring a costume too disruptive, I'm sure they'd toss me onto the tracks.
 

Rin

Forum Captain
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We're told manikins on the table is a fail.

Figures. Are exceptions generally made for older folks etc. that can't get down on the ground? They may be willing to bear the injury/pain in a real emergency, but there's no point on doing so for a class.

[QUOTE =mycrofft;531521]
Everything else is so subjective I'm not going to make a play by play description of moving outer garments back off the shoulders like a shawl, etc.[/QUOTE]

Loooool, lame. I'm picturing a scene from an 80's movie now.
 

Handsome Robb

Youngin'
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I've done CPR classes on tables before. Wait maybe that was the CPR portion of ACLS...I can't remember. I've done CPR on a COR mannequin on a table in an alphabet supe class.

I don't personally see the issue here. If they want to take the risk of exposing themselves and/or intentionally position their clothing in order to try and use their sexual appeal to further themselves that's on them. Doesn't affect me in any way shape or form.

One thing I will never understand is why women wear low cut shirts and yell when they catch a guy glancing. I don't yell when girls give me elevator eyes. I know a chick who has three diamond peircings between her breasts in a line superior to inferior and she freaks out when people look at them. You put something shiny there what do you expect!?
 

UnkiEMT

Forum Truck Monkey
Premium Member
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One thing I will never understand is why women wear low cut shirts and yell when they catch a guy glancing. I don't yell when girls give me elevator eyes. I know a chick who has three diamond peircings between her breasts in a line superior to inferior and she freaks out when people look at them. You put something shiny there what do you expect!?

The opportunity to be morally outraged?
 

UnkiEMT

Forum Truck Monkey
Premium Member
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Figures. Are exceptions generally made for older folks etc. that can't get down on the ground? They may be willing to bear the injury/pain in a real emergency, but there's no point on doing so for a class.

Personally it hasn't come up for me. If it were a recert I'd probably let it slide, but if it was an initial cert I'd make them get down...perhaps if I had enough advanced notice I'd try to get a step stool or something so they could do it from standing with enough of a height advantage to still compress. It'd still be bad for the back, but would spare the knees.
 

ExpatMedic0

MS, NRP
Premium Member
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I'm tired of female students coming to a CPR class, where presumably they know they'll be doing CPR on manikins, with very low cut tops, three inch heels, etc. (So far, no guys drooping too far or male crop tops).

Last time the two who did were rearranging their clothing to present more cleavage before we started floor exercise.
Let me know if you need some extra CPR instructors in your class!
I don't personally have a problem with it, but you could always ask people dress "business casual" or in comfortable clothing. I have had to attend CME classes with dress codes like these.
 
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Rin

Forum Captain
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One thing I will never understand is why women wear low cut shirts and yell when they catch a guy glancing.

Because you get dressed, look at your short self in the mirror, and say, "Everything's covered, good to go." Then you go out and you have men a foot taller than you with their higher vantage point, and suddenly
every top is low cut. Women's clothes are made that way and it's very difficult to find clothing that's not low cut and/or see through (tops AND bottoms). I've gone to class in men's jeans & a pocket T and caught men leering down my shirt. It's constant and it's very tiresome...
 

rails

Forum Lieutenant
Premium Member
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Let me know if you need some extra CPR instructors in your class!
I don't personally have a problem with it, but you could always ask people dress "business casual" or in comfortable clothing. I have had to attend CME classes with dress codes like these.

I second that. The "business casual" idea sounds like a safe way to communicate that requirement without risking offending anyone. You could also say "business casual" and list specific requirements (e.g. slacks, polo shirt).
 

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