FP-C without a class...

STXmedic

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A friend of mine did it with only self-study. I've heard of others doing it too.

The resources are definitely there. I've got the Back to Basics and AceSat books, as well as borrowing the ResQ Shop's videos. Those seem like good preps for the test specifically. I've also hit up YouTube quite a bit for just general knowledge and concepts. I feel like I'm close to prepared, but haven't signed up to test yet. I just got hired for my first flight job, so I should in end up with it shortly (hopefully).
 

VentMonkey

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can you do it? What resources did you use?


(As an aside, FIRST POST!)
Absolutely, it can, and has been done.

Would I recommend it? If you have a fairly solid critical care foundation, perhaps. If you were/are like myself, and were a street paramedic with little to no CCP experience prior, probably not.

There are tons of study guides, aids, prep courses that are out there, but a lot of it can be overwhelming if you've got limited experience in the critical care environment.

The prep course I recommend, and one we use at my program, is Orchid Lopez' Back To Basics. It's an EXCELLENT 2 day prep course taught by a very knowledgeable lady who is well versed, and respected by her peers.

She had the easiest ways to show things such as IABP timing, and ABG's.

If you have the time, and cashflow, Creighton's CCP course is top notch, IMO. A 5 month "boot camp" of critical care complete with abstracts to read through, discussion boards, excellent lectures, and another very knowledgeable, and respected instructor by the name of Rick Erickson.
 

VentMonkey

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I should also mention, if flight isn't your thing, the CCP-C is essentially the same thing, without the flight portion. Both of the courses I mention help with either test.

I've been told the replace flight questions with more med scenarios, and transport safety.

I do know the layout for each test in terms of questions, should be on the IBSC's website.
 
OP
NomadicMedic

NomadicMedic

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IMG_5363.JPG
This is my current reading.
 

VentMonkey

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That's her...and her book, haha.

She basically shows you how to dissect the exam in a way to give you the highest possibility at first pass success.

I bought her book before going to the class, studied, and admittedly bombed the modules.

When I did sit in on the course ir made much more sense to me, and redid the modules until I average ~80-85%. Again, no tricks up my sleeve just a shyte ton of studying.

Good luck to ya, DE. Let us know how you fair!
 

VentMonkey

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I'm still really torn on flight.

...and too fat.

But, it seems to be one place where I can actually grow as a medic.
Do you have CCP in your neck of the woods?

It seems like getting into ground critical care, and becoming more familiar with vents and how they work (not just "copying and pasting"), drips, meds, pumps, lab values etc. is an invaluable way to see if you (anyone) will like flight.

I think all too often people are drawn to flight medicine for the wrong reasons. After all, it's exactly what you said it is, or at least should be...

...an excellent way to grow as a medic.
 
OP
NomadicMedic

NomadicMedic

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We don't have any real CCT here. I do about the most advanced stuff there currently is on the ground. If the local program can't fly, its common that I'll take STEMI patients from the community hospital to the STEMI facility, a vented S/P cardiac arrest or a crashing trauma patient that needs to go to the level 1.

I'm probably a bit more up to speed on vents than the average medic, having done a zillion* vent transfers in the past. (We carried an LTV1200 on the truck) and we carried a couple of Baxter transport pumps for propofol and other stuff. I am woefully underexposed to IABP and the measurements used.

I've been studying pretty hard and I think I'm going to start swinging at the practice tests in a few weeks.

*actual number is significantly less than a zillion.
 

Scott33

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Here is a thumbnail of the books I used for the FP-C, CCP-C, CTRN, and CFRN. I have never taken a review class, nor have I re-certified by CME. If you read enough of these books, and do enough practice MCQs with detailed rationales, you will do well on the exam.

FullSizeRender.jpg.jpg
 

VentMonkey

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We don't have any real CCT here. I do about the most advanced stuff there currently is on the ground. If the local program can't fly, its common that I'll take STEMI patients from the community hospital to the STEMI facility, a vented S/P cardiac arrest or a crashing trauma patient that needs to go to the level 1.

I'm probably a bit more up to speed on vents than the average medic, having done a zillion* vent transfers in the past. (We carried an LTV1200 on the truck) and we carried a couple of Baxter transport pumps for propofol and other stuff. I am woefully underexposed to IABP and the measurements used.

I've been studying pretty hard and I think I'm going to start swinging at the practice tests in a few weeks.

*actual number is significantly less than a zillion.
I'm curious, what kind of vent does/ did SCEMS carry for patients that are RSI-d (DFA)?
 
OP
NomadicMedic

NomadicMedic

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SCEMS had autovent 4000 transport vents. I know, don't say it.

We also had another, smaller, vent that we used with LUCAS CPR. The autovent would constantly alarm due to over pressure when LUCAS CPR was on going and would stack up breaths, and the other vent, which the mfg escapes me, would just keep delivering ventilation, like an old style demand valve.

I've also been gone a few years. This may have changed. SCEMS was/is not shy about changing gear if they find something better.
 

SeeNoMore

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I thought the difficulty of the test was very exaggerated. I used the ACE Sat book and Wingfield's video series. I know plenty of people who did not take any review course of any kind and passed.
 

VentMonkey

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Fair enough, and I will agree that people made it out to be "super hard". My take is, while yes, anyone can take, and pass it, you still have to put in some study time. For me, perhaps more than others since I lacked the knowledge base, but honestly I took it on a whim ironically enough because one of the CCT medics had said how difficult it was, so naturally I wanted to see for myself what the hoopla was all about.

Now, what gets me is the people who take it lightly, and wonder why they failed. I would have to say that it reminded me of NR in that I had to set my appointment and go through the CBT similar to NR, I had to study my butt off, similar to NR, but the curriculum was different. Turns out, I kinda like critical care.
 

SeeNoMore

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I agree you need to put in some study time, but I guess I was a little underwhelmed. I guess it's just the standard at this point.
 

AnthonyTheEmt

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View attachment 3001 This is my current reading.


Dude, I work for the company that wrote "Flight Paramedic Certification: A comprehensive study guide" by Kyle Faudree.

I've also taken the class, and recently passed the test for FP-C. It is a hard class, and a pretty difficult test. But I passed on the first try. The class is definitely the way to go for those of us who don't have experience with some of the things covered on the tests, such as vents, schwann-ganz, IABP's.

I dont want to be that guy that goes around throwing advertisements as people, so I will just leave the link here for you guys to check out on your own. Feel free to message me with any questions about it.

http://www.iamed.us/
 

VentMonkey

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Dude, I work for the company that wrote "Flight Paramedic Certification: A comprehensive study guide" by Kyle Faudree.

I've also taken the class, and recently passed the test for FP-C. It is a hard class, and a pretty difficult test. But I passed on the first try. The class is definitely the way to go for those of us who don't have experience with some of the things covered on the tests, such as vents, schwann-ganz, IABP's.

I dont want to be that guy that goes around throwing advertisements as people, so I will just leave the link here for you guys to check out on your own. Feel free to message me with any questions about it.

http://www.iamed.us/
Dude! Right on, brah! I dig your enthusiasm, Anthony, but perhaps starting off by calling random strangers on the interwebs "dude" isn't the coolest way to go about it.

Cool website, BTW. What are your end goals with the FP-C if I might ask?

Also, it's "swan-ganz". Not harping on ya or trying to stir the pot, but understand, as a profession we need to try and conduct ourselves professionally, especially on a forum with a section dedicated to upping our professional game, so to speak. Anyhow, good luck with your endeavors what ever they may be:)
 

AnthonyTheEmt

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Dude! Right on, brah! I dig your enthusiasm, Anthony, but perhaps starting off by calling random strangers on the interwebs "dude" isn't the coolest way to go about it.

Cool website, BTW. What are your end goals with the FP-C if I might ask?

Also, it's "swan-ganz". Not harping on ya or trying to stir the pot, but understand, as a profession we need to try and conduct ourselves professionally, especially on a forum with a section dedicated to upping our professional game, so to speak. Anyhow, good luck with your endeavors what ever they may be:)

Sorry bout that, just a force of habit. I just call everyone dude ever since watching Ninja Turtles as a kid.

In regards to your question, FP-C is something I had been interested in for a while, but honestly didn't know much about it. However, I dont know if its in my future as a long term projection. I spent 8 years on a box and dont plan on going back to it anytime soon, or maybe ever. I dig teaching, so hopefully that is in the future. I worked as a medic preceptor for a little while and got a taste of teaching. It is actually a lot harder than it looks. But with that in mind, I have a better idea of what it entails.
 

FoleyArtist

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where's the closest place from socal to take attend a cctp or fpc class? is it all distance education?
 

DesertMedic66

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where's the closest place from socal to take attend a cctp or fpc class? is it all distance education?
UMBC has a CCEMT-P class in San Diego in January.

IA Med is hosting a FP-C class in July of 2017 in Riverside (sounds like just a review of topics for the FP-C test).
 

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