For real military medics etc.: LOAC, Geneva Conventions, and you.

hjp31bravoMP

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It's the shooting that makes things interesting. We've been lucky so far. *knocks on wood

As for your earlier post, you're absolutely right, neither one of us wants to take a round, but at least the medic has a better shot at saving the MP than the MP does at saving the medic!
 
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mycrofft

mycrofft

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Roj that.

I hate "interesting".
 

HNcorpsman

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hey hjpbravo- PM me and tell me which FOB and province you are at , im assuming army becuase you keep saying medic... anyways i am in one of the marine ETTs up north near the border of pakistan so far we have seen quite a bit of combat, and get small arms fire at our COP nearly every day. good stuff.
 
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mycrofft

mycrofft

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Calling Afflixion...

Oh, right, he's too busy being home to play with us.
Good on him!!B)
 

hjp31bravoMP

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hey hjpbravo- PM me and tell me which FOB and province you are at , im assuming army becuase you keep saying medic... anyways i am in one of the marine ETTs up north near the border of pakistan so far we have seen quite a bit of combat, and get small arms fire at our COP nearly every day. good stuff.

For the sake of OPSEC, I won't give specifics, but my guess is I'm a bit south of you, but along the border none-the-less. Yes, I'm Army, but the medic is Air Force and a former Marine.
 

HNcorpsman

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understandable... i was just wondering if your in the same province as me, but it doesnt really matter. anyways good luck to you...
 

newguy

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I served as a combat medic with an Army light infantry platoon, the only thing different about what I wore or carried was my medic bag. I was armed, humped extra ammo, grenades, c-4 or whatever needed carrying short of crew served weapons, i.e. M-60 or tripod, or mortar tubes, baseplates or shells....Apparently that was against the "non-combatant" status, however there was nothing non combatant about what I did short of the actual patient care. I pulled guard duty, dug holes...lots of holes, placed mines, went on patrols, etc....I figured my best bet was to become an excellent infantryman and take care of medicine when necessary.

thats what line (combat medics) medics do. they are always a medic but they do everything a grunt would and then some. Combat Medics are allowed to carry 5.56/9mm weapons, so M16/M4/M9/M11...no crew served weapons.

regarding the ROE...your personal safety and the safety of those around you are your main objective. when hostiles engage you, answer back the same. every Soldier has the right to "self defense."

That doesn't mean killing innocent people and then plant a gun next to them and call it "self defense."
 

Afflixion

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Oh, right, he's too busy being home to play with us.
Good on him!!B)

Ah I decided to check in on y'all today! LOL. Sorry, I've been busy doing my "capstone project" for my degree, woo last thing to do.

Anywho, to jump into the conversation let me start off by stating that I am not and never was a FOBBIT, I did my fair share of combat operations, I went on MCPs and AASLT missions with my troops in both my deployments, when I was bored I moonlighted at the CSH ED, secondly not to bust balls but IBA stands for Interceptor, Body Armor (besides now its IOTV haha...hate those pieces of garbage.)

All I have to say is that I carried an M4 and M9 with a full combat load for them, I never once "set down my weapon" while treating a casualty I slung it across my back. Little hajji children are like ninjas they come out of nowhere and rob you blind, so hence forth laying down your weapon is not a brilliant idea. As I've stated earlier I've been a gunner when mine got sick or I simply got bored. It is not a violation of the Geneva Conventions as I do not wear a red cross on a white backing, thus taking away my protected personnel status. I've cleared buildings and done all that fun MOUT stuff before too. Also I don't treat in the open, and I sure as hell won't expose myself until fire superiority is gained and proper security is present. Another tip is make your guys call your name not "medic" or "doc" when they need one... Trust me hajji knows what those words mean.
 
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mycrofft

mycrofft

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Welcome back

Oh, your signature...made many jumps lately? ;)
 

SuaSponte

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this is a great thread, I cant speak for ne1 else but heres my realistic approach...

roe to civis: rules of engagement that are for the good of all humanity.
roe to combat operators: another way for an officer to **** enlisted types.

in combat there is alot of trust thrown around, trust that u know ur job, trust that u aint a pos & trust that u'll back up ur buddies.

that trust + training is what keeps people alive, roe is thrown right out the window when the lead starts to land.

when we would roll out the SGM(boss) would say: if u feel threatened shoot em in the face, get ur story straight & we'll back u up. and thats the way it was, is & should be.

all these medical military types and still I can't find the correct phrase in this thread: "The best medicine on the battlefield is fire superiority!" <--that is the jist of it for ne1 who doesn't get it, that phrase is real life.

I wish all scenario questions started with "While under fire..." i'd get every1 right! lol
 
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mycrofft

mycrofft

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Ropes/Rapelling

My former coworker who was ex spec forces asked if I didn't see the resemblance between pinatas and people rapelling under fire.
 

SoldierMedic

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<---- Currently serving as a medic in the United States Army Reserve. Forgive me for not reading all the posts on the subject. But I've read enough to mirror alot of the statements on here.

Secure the area first and foremost... Get that soldier out into cover, do not work out in the open because you are asking to get shot too! A dead medic is no good to his sqaud / platoon.

If they raise a weapon and I feel threatened... I won't hesitate to raise my M4 to light them up, and damn right I will never place it down.
 

newguy

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<---- Currently serving as a medic in the United States Army Reserve. Forgive me for not reading all the posts on the subject. But I've read enough to mirror alot of the statements on here.

Secure the area first and foremost... Get that soldier out into cover, do not work out in the open because you are asking to get shot too! A dead medic is no good to his sqaud / platoon.

If they raise a weapon and I feel threatened... I won't hesitate to raise my M4 to light them up, and damn right I will never place it down.

Thats the difference between reserve medics and active duty line medics. reserve..."damn right i will never place it down." if thats your response then how will you treat the PT? active duty, my line medic and i put our primary weapon down because we have our secondary on our chests. we place the primary under our *** while we sit on it...sorta like praying position (on our knees) reason why we were taught that is because the primary (in most cases) are M4s or PSD MP5s, too long to draw up to fire, yeah yeah yeah i understand you were only taught with a M16 or M4 "adapt and overcome" BS...but when you get to a line unit, they understand a medic needs primary M4 and secondary M9. so if a tango/hostile were to apear while we were treating a PT then we can draw our secondary weapon (of course you will have some troops to pull security-just trust them and do what you do best-save lives), we use serpa holsters because they are reliable and has a fast draw. i know reserves do not have any "high speed" units because 99.99% of the Combat Arms are in the National Guard, but if you ever get a chance to serve with SpecOps or Line units their medics are a different breed from nonline units. you'll see what i mean when you serve with them. good luck to you in the reserves.

as for Air Assault in the US Army; that is basically rappelling and load master. no one will ever jump out of the heli in AA school...BUTTTTT when they get to their units like the 82nd and 101st then they will jump out of the helis...its pretty sweet one of my favorites (i've only down a couple out of a blackhawk).

as for Airborne in the Us Army; they learn static jumps. on most occassions the paras go to airborne units but sometimes soldiers can reenlist just for the school we call them "5 jump chump." no HALO jumps, thats for the special people.

as for pathfinder in the us army; experts at land nav and finds landing strips for aircrafts and drop zones...i've never been to that school but my friend told me that it was worth going to.
 

HNcorpsman

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haha... i was issued a M9 for this deployment to Afghanistan... you know where it is when i go on patrols or convoys? by my bed!!! haha i never use the damn thing... i just carry more 5.56 ammo.. in the firefights we get, a M9 is useless. the enemy is always hiding far away in the mountains... this isnt Iraq. medicine is the last thing on my mind when im out there. its more important to know how to call for fire, and CAS.
 

newguy

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DOC-

Dude, you get to call for fire?! Thats sweet! Being in A'stan i guess it'd make sense with all them mountains. i get what you're saying, take the ammo that counts. here in iraq...hahahaha...its really boring. i've never used my M9, just for show or when i need to carry something light to the mess hall (lock up the M4). Be safe man. One of my boys just died a few days ago after he was MEDEVAC'd from A'stan.
 

HNcorpsman

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yeah, if things get bad enough i might be placed in the posistion to call for fire, or CAS... see being in a Embedded training team, or mission is train and mentor tha afghan national army, therefore there are only 3 marines and one corpsman (me) so if it gets bad enough they might call upon me to get on the radio and call for fire... pretty scary sometimes... how long do you have left in Iraq?
 

newguy

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yeah, if things get bad enough i might be placed in the posistion to call for fire, or CAS... see being in a Embedded training team, or mission is train and mentor tha afghan national army, therefore there are only 3 marines and one corpsman (me) so if it gets bad enough they might call upon me to get on the radio and call for fire... pretty scary sometimes... how long do you have left in Iraq?

bro you know i can't say...opsec. but once i get stateside i'll send you a pic of a nice cold beer
 

dmdenike

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When i was in the Marines (got out last month) our corpsman (navy docs) carried M4's just like us and fought just like us. Just thought I'd share.
 
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mycrofft

mycrofft

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Thanks D!

During Cold War and into Bush I's actions (Grenada, Panama, DESERT SHIELD/STORM) we were taught LOAC and lethal force doctrine, but we were told unofficially to be ready to do more than just stand by.
 
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