flight paramedic study material

ffemt101986

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I am attempting to take the plunge into flight medicine and was wanting to know what material is good to study for the test and any other advise people with experience might have as I go through this process.
 

TransportJockey

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I did a number if things. I took a distance learning critical care class through Creighton University. I also used the ACE SAT book and video series from will Wingfield. And I took the FlightBridgeED practice tests.
 

STXmedic

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I've been meaning to ask you, how was that Creighton class? Was it a big help, or could up have just as easily taught yourself the material? Were they just teaching from a book?
 

truetiger

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I'd start with a critical care class and then get the ACE SAT book, as well as the ASTNA book.
 
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ffemt101986

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I looked up the program at Creighton. Is it worth exploring as an option or would you recommend a course to actually attend?
 

TransportJockey

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I've been meaning to ask you, how was that Creighton class? Was it a big help, or could up have just as easily taught yourself the material? Were they just teaching from a book?


I looked up the program at Creighton. Is it worth exploring as an option or would you recommend a course to actually attend?

Honestly it was worth it. Good instructors and I leaned a lot even with the distance learning format. Plus clinicals and hands on skills lab. I'm debating retaking it for college credit.
 

ExpatMedic0

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I did the CCEMT-P at UMBC, and own the ASTNA text also. I have herd good things about the ACE book. EMTLIFE username "Eccg" took the CCEMT-P with me at UMBC and he passed his FP-C in the high 80 percentage range. He used the ACE SAT as a supplement for study.

I have not tested for my FP-C yet but a newer FP-C review book caught my eye written by an Aeromedical Physician Assistant who does air medical transport in special operations and also holds an FP-C. I spoke with him last week and he said the kindle edition will be out sometime this month. It has impressive reviews on amazon. http://www.amazon.com/Flight-Parame...d=1383389794&sr=1-1&keywords=flight+paramedic
 
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TransportJockey

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Do you happen to know how many people they let in and how many usually apply?

I know my class was 25 or so people. I'm not sure how many people apply. The application process is actually a rather long one to.
 

CriticalCareIFT

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I am attempting to take the plunge into flight medicine and was wanting to know what material is good to study for the test and any other advise people with experience might have as I go through this process.

What is your current paramedic experience? 911? Transport? Critical Care?

Are you looking strictly at passing the FP-C exam? Or critical care education?
 
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ExpatMedic0

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What is your current paramedic experience? 911? Transport? Critical Care?

Are you looking strictly at passing the FP-C exam? Or critical care education?

Hmmm... I wonder who this could be. :)
 

CriticalCareIFT

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Honestly it was worth it. Good instructors and I leaned a lot even with the distance learning format. Plus clinicals and hands on skills lab. I'm debating retaking it for college credit.

Is it recorded video lectures for each topic that you watch? Is there any interactive component where you can directly ask questions? Also are the instructors paramedics or it's a mix of providers: MD/DO/RN/RTT?

What were the clinicals like? Were you treated like an unwanted guest?
 

TransportJockey

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Is it recorded video lectures for each topic that you watch? Is there any interactive component where you can directly ask questions? Also are the instructors paramedics or it's a mix of providers: MD/DO/RN/RTT?

What were the clinicals like? Were you treated like an unwanted guest?

Recorded with case studies and a good forum system for interaction. Most providers were paramedics but there were a few RRTs and MDs that taught some blocks. I believe there might have been an RN as well.
Clinicals were good. I did mine in Denver so I don't know what everyone's experience was like. But I was treated pretty well and as long as I showed an interest in learning they were happy to have me. You could set up clinicals in a number of areas.
 

CriticalCareIFT

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Recorded with case studies and a good forum system for interaction. Most providers were paramedics but there were a few RRTs and MDs that taught some blocks. I believe there might have been an RN as well.
Clinicals were good. I did mine in Denver so I don't know what everyone's experience was like. But I was treated pretty well and as long as I showed an interest in learning they were happy to have me. You could set up clinicals in a number of areas.

For once it's great to hear that course is well put and you had good experience. From my experience it has been hit or miss and usually it's miss, when it comes to these courses.


Hmmm... I wonder who this could be. :)
Hey man! Yes, I registered. :)
 
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ffemt101986

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I've been a paramedic for almost 4 years in, what I would consider, a fairly busy EMS system. My end goal is flying however, right now I just want to learn as much as I can.
 

CriticalCareIFT

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I've been a paramedic for almost 4 years in, what I would consider, a fairly busy EMS system. My end goal is flying however, right now I just want to learn as much as I can.

As far as passing the FP-C exam the Aeromedical Certification Examinations Self-Assessment Test by William E Wingfield and newest CAMTS edition would suffice. You could couple that with Will's video course and I honestly think most will pass the exam.

Real critical care education however cannot be obtained from these exam preps, or medic alphabet soup courses (I know because I took most of them). To get a decent foundation you would have to take actual college level courses, classes offered to hospital staff at the hospitals (this will cost alot), read medical literature, and get away from EMS and become either RN or RTT and start working in a hospital setting.

I work ground critical care transport, so I cannot speak about of what will get you a flight job. But I can honestly say EMS "critical care" anything is merit badge nonsense.
 

MSDeltaFlt

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Since the FP-C exam tests the experienced candidate, passing the exam without first gaining said experience translates only into one thing. That you don't know the first thing about critical care areomedical transport.

Take a college level critical care class. Spend time in the ICU's (read pleural) shadowing MD's, RN's, RRT's for about a year on your own time if you can't find a good ground critical care transport position and network your tail off.

Being a flight paramedic does not mean that you get to fly around in a helicopter, wear really cool uniforms, and go around intubating people. You're not in a flying ambulance. You're in a flying ICU. Big difference.

Not only are you supposed to be at the top of your game. But you're supposed to be at the top of EVERBODY's game: the street medic's game, the trauma RN's game, the ICU RN's game, the Neuro ICU RN's game, CVICU RN, PICU RN, OB RN, NICU RN, ER RRT, ICU RRT, RRT NPS.

If you do not fully understand the ICU, and all that critical care entails (like nearly every single flight paramedic I've seen), then you will not be much more than your flight RN's attache' who should be seen and not heard.

All I've mentioned require the one thing that cannot be taught. Experience. Please, go get some before you test. Seriously.
 
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Carlos Danger

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This:

Real critical care education however cannot be obtained from these exam preps, or medic alphabet soup courses (I know because I took most of them).

To get a decent foundation you would have to take actual college level courses, classes offered to hospital staff at the hospitals (this will cost alot), read medical literature, and get away from EMS and become either RN or RTT and start working in a hospital setting.

I work ground critical care transport, so I cannot speak about of what will get you a flight job. But I can honestly say EMS "critical care" anything is merit badge nonsense.


And this:

If you do not fully understand the ICU, and all that critical care entails (like nearly every single flight paramedic I've seen), then you will not be much more than your flight RN's attache' who should be seen and not heard.

All I've mentioned require the one thing that cannot be taught. Experience. Please, go get some before you test. Seriously.

I have found that most paramedics don't want to hear these hard truths, but reality is what it is.
 

ExpatMedic0

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Critical Care Paramedic is a masters degree in Australia and other countries(http://www.ecu.edu.au/future-students/our-courses/overview?id=I58), but in "MERIKA" you can take 12 months of vocational training, then 2 weeks of "critical care" course, then buy a study guide and pass your FP-C with no experience at all. Merika, !:censored::censored::censored: YEAH!
You can probably thank the nurses unions and fire departments for that in the states (bring on the flames!) ;-)
 
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Carlos Danger

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You can probably thank the nurses unions and fire departments for that in the states (bring on the flames!) ;-)

Yeah, because the nursing unions have complete control over the length and content of paramedic programs :rolleyes:

Also, you do realize that a very small minority (< 10%) of RN's in the US belong to unions, right?

But what's easier than blaming your professions problems on another?
 
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